Water News 2024

Navigating Icy Roads and Road Salt for Drinking Water Health

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2024      Last Edited: 23 February 2024

Uppert Thames River Conservation Authority

Salt is commonly used to melt ice and reduce the risk created by icy conditions, but it also poses a significant threat to water quality. It’s important to ensure our use of salt doesn’t jeopardize the health of our groundwater and, with it, our drinking water. Click here to continue reading

Why this Ontario town created a bylaw for using bubblers in lakes

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2024      Last Edited: 23 February 2024

Cottage Life

While de-icers may protect structures, they can also endanger snowmobilers, wildlife, and other cottage-goers. In September 2023, the Township of Armour, enacted a bylaw regulating the use of de-icers. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: White House is distributing $5.8 billion from the infrastructure law for water projects

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2024      Last Edited: 23 February 2024

Daily Commercial News

The Biden administration announced Tuesday that it is distributing another $5.8 billion for water infrastructure projects around the country. The new allocations will go to projects in all 50 states, bringing the total awarded to states for water infrastructure projects to $22 billion. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Administration announces $5.8 billion in funding to clean up nation’s drinking water, upgrade infrastructure

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2024      Last Edited: 23 February 2024

CNN

Projects underway in Pittsburgh – such as an effort to get rid of lead pipes – are among several across the country that are being funded through bipartisan 2021 legislation that designated $50 billion toward improving water infrastructure. Click here to continue reading

Most Alberta river flows within normal range

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2024      Last Edited: 23 February 2024

The Western Producer

 

Water levels on the Bow River from Calgary to the mouth of the South Saskatchewan River are running within normal seasonal ranges as of mid-February and the Red Deer River is also flowing at average levels. Click here to continue reading

Water expert warns of changes in runoff, demand

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2024      Last Edited: 23 February 2024

The Western Producer

University of Saskatchewan professor John Pomeroy says traditional weather patterns are shifting in Alberta due to climate change, which will make it necessary to build infrastructure better able to capture earlier spring runoff. Click here to continue reading

‘Every litre counts’: City pleads for Winnipeggers to limit water use as massive sewage spill continues

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2024      Last Edited: 22 February 2024

CBC

The City of Winnipeg wants some 90,000 residences and businesses in the southwest area of the city to know that every little bit of water they can keep from flowing into the sewer system helps, after a pipe crossing under the Red River near Fort Garry Bridge broke two weeks ago. Click here to continue reading

Deadline for clean drinking water class action lawsuit draws near

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2024      Last Edited: 22 February 2024

Ha-Shilth-Sa

Time is running out to apply for a share of the First Nations Drinking Water class action settlement fund. Application forms can be found online and must be submitted before March 7, 2024. Click here to continue reading

Why a dry winter may not mean trouble for Alberta farmers

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2024      Last Edited: 22 February 2024

CTV News

As drought conditions in Alberta worsen, one local farmer is holding out hope. Scott Jesperson, an Edmonton area producer and vice chair of Alberta Grains, said the dry winter won’t hurt grain growers as long as spring brings rain. Click here to continue reading

Quebec institutions join to develop sustainable water management solution

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2024      Last Edited: 22 February 2024

Water Canada

The Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and the Fédération québécoise des municipalités (FQM) have joined forces to develop sustainable water management solutions as part of the fight against climate change. Click here to continue reading

Opinion: Natural infrastructure is a solution in the face of drought

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2024      Last Edited: 22 February 2024

Calgary Herald

Another piece of the drought-busting puzzle needs more attention natural infrastructure. Natural infrastructure allows us to work with nature to help meet infrastructure needs. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Even very low levels of pesticide exposure can affect fish for generations

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2024      Last Edited: 22 February 2024

Science Daily

Fish exposed to some pesticides at extremely low concentrations for a brief period of time can demonstrate lasting behavioral changes, with the impact extending to offspring that were never exposed firsthand, a recent study found. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Surging bills, fewer showers: India’s Bengaluru reels under water shortage

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2024      Last Edited: 22 February 2024

Reuters

Bengaluru is facing an acute water shortage this year, months before peak summer, forcing many residents in “India’s Silicon Valley” to ration their water use and pay almost double the usual price to meet their daily needs. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Smelly Serbian wastewater adds to environmental woes

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2024      Last Edited: 22 February 2024

Reuters

The problem, caused by a lack of treatment plants, further complicates Serbia’s bid to the join the European Union, which demands far stricter standards than those enforced in Belgrade and across the Balkans, experts say. Click here to continue reading

Kirkland Lake’s water usage per day more than double the national average

PUBLISHED: 21 February 2024      Last Edited: 21 February 2024

Kirkland Lake Northern News

In the report, Eric Neilson, Regional Manager for Northeastern Ontario, OCWA stated Canada averages 300 litres to 500 litres of water per person per day. Using a population of 7750 people, in 2023 Kirkland Lakers used Produced 8,948 cubic meters per day on average, which works out to be 1154 litres per day, per person. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Southwest Winnipeg residents asked to limit water use as sewage continues to spill into Red River

PUBLISHED: 21 February 2024      Last Edited: 21 February 2024

CBC

The City of Winnipeg is asking residents in southwest Winnipeg to reduce their water flow, as sewage continues to spill into the Red River near Fort Garry Bridge after a pipe broke earlier this month. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Researchers shed light on river resiliency to flooding

PUBLISHED: 21 February 2024      Last Edited: 21 February 2024

Science Daily

Increased understanding of rivers’ resiliency is important to maintaining healthy rivers, as human actions can affect flood regimes and change the conditions in rivers for other aquatic life that may rely on algae and plants as a food source. Click here to continue reading

Impact of new flood maps the focus of Calgary town hall meeting

PUBLISHED: 21 February 2024      Last Edited: 21 February 2024

CTV News

Severe flooding in 2013(opens in a new tab), the worst in the province’s history, sparked the Alberta Government to update its flood hazard mapping. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: At least 60% of US population may face ‘forever chemicals’ in tap water, tests suggest

PUBLISHED: 20 February 2024      Last Edited: 20 February 2024

The Guardian

About 70 million people are exposed to toxic PFAS “forever chemicals” in US drinking water, new testing from the Environmental Protection Agency has found. But the testing completed to date has only checked about one-third of the nation’s public water systems, meaning the agency is on pace to find over 200 million people are exposed, or at least 60% of the US population. Click here to continue reading

Sask. offers help to water-short town

PUBLISHED: 20 February 2024      Last Edited: 20 February 2024

The Western Producer

The MLA for a community that declared a state of local emergency due to low water levels in December says the province will help it find solutions. “It’s a moving target but definitely, we aren’t going to leave our communities stranded from extreme conditions. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Rain Comes to the Arctic, With a Cascade of Troubling Changes

PUBLISHED: 20 February 2024      Last Edited: 20 February 2024

Yale Environment 360

Rain used to be rare in the Arctic, but as the region warms, so-called “rain-on-snow events” are becoming more common. The rains accelerate ice loss, trigger flooding, landslides, and avalanches, and create problems for wildlife and the Indigenous people who depend on them. Click here to continue reading

Alberta’s Brutal Water Reckoning

PUBLISHED: 20 February 2024      Last Edited: 20 February 2024

The Tyee

Alberta’s water reckoning has begun in earnest. Snowpack accumulations in the Oldman River basin, the Bow River basin and the North Saskatchewan River basin range from 33 to 62 per cent below normal. Click here to continue reading

Low water levels affect southern Alta. power generation

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2024      Last Edited: 16 February 2024

The Western Producer

Recent low levels on southern Alberta rivers have affected the amount of electricity generated by Irrican Power, owned by the St. Mary River and Raymond irrigation districts, and by TransAlta. Click here to continue reading/

Beavers can mitigate drought threat: analyst

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2024      Last Edited: 16 February 2024

The Western Producer

Alberta conservation group is promoting beaver habitat as a way to keep water on the land amid rising drought concerns in the province. “Beavers can provide benefits and always have provided benefits from an environmental perspective but also from an ecosystem goods and services perspective with drought and flood mitigation”. Click here to continue reading

Sask. watches water levels closely

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2024      Last Edited: 16 February 2024

The Western Producer

The head of Saskatchewan’s Water Security Agency says the province is watching Alberta’s preparation for potential water shortages with concern but also with the security of Lake Diefenbaker behind it. Click here to continue reading

Important Notice: 2024 Irrigation Season Water Supply Update FEBRUARY 2024

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2024      Last Edited: 16 February 2024

St. Mary River Irrigation District

The winter water storage level in the St. Mary River Irrigation District reservoirs remain stable. The Waterton, St. Mary and Milk River Ridge reservoirs experience minor gains, and are still below the lower quartiles for February. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: ‘I feel abandoned’: These Spanish towns haven’t had clean tap water for 10 months

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2024      Last Edited: 15 February 2024

EuroNews Green

Andalucía residents are afraid to wash their children with the tap water, and say even dogs refuse to drink it. Click here to continue reading

Over 50 water shortage advisories issued for Province

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2024      Last Edited: 15 February 2024

centralalbertaonline

Alberta Environment and Parks has issued 51 water shortage advisories for the Province of Alberta. With low amounts of snowfall this season so far many areas are reporting a lack of water and snow pack to melt into the rivers. Click here to continue reading

Priority? Licence transfers? Here’s how Alberta’s water system works

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2024      Last Edited: 15 February 2024

CBC

Alberta’s water usage is front and centre this year. Here’s how the system operates. The Water Act of 2000 states that all water in the province, as well as the right to its diversion and use, is vested in the Crown. This means that water can only be used with the permission of the provincial government. For municipalities and businesses, including most agriculture, this permission is tied to a license. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: What will Spain look like when it runs out of water? Barcelona is giving us a glimpse

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2024      Last Edited: 15 February 2024

The Guardian

The European Drought Observatory’s map of current droughts in Europe shows the entire Spanish Mediterranean coast in bad shape, with red areas indicating an alert similar to those in north Africa and Sicily. Europe is warming at twice the rate of other continents. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: LA County captured enough rainfall this week to provide water to 65,600 residents for a year

PUBLISHED: 14 February 2024      Last Edited: 14 February 2024

CNN

While this week’s atmospheric river drenched Southern California with record-breaking rainfall, some water managers were busy capturing some of that runoff to save for dry days ahead. Others were busy fending off an environmental disaster. Click here to continue reading

First Nations say Ring of Fire development could have negative effects on water systems

PUBLISHED: 14 February 2024      Last Edited: 14 February 2024

CTV News

At a three-day annual lands and resources forum in North Bay, members of the Anishinabek Nation expressed fears that further development could harm the environment, water and fish that swim in area lakes, rivers and streams. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Sewage Across Borders: The Tijuana River Is Spewing Wastewater Into San Diego Amid Historic Storms, Which Could Threaten Public Health

PUBLISHED: 14 February 2024      Last Edited: 14 February 2024

Inside Climate News

Winding around 120 miles northward from Mexico to California before reaching the ocean on the U.S. side of the border, the Tijuana River carries millions—at times, billions—of gallons of sewage across the border each day. Click here to continue reading

Minister ‘confident’ B.C. is adequately preparing for drought, energy needs

PUBLISHED: 14 February 2024      Last Edited: 14 February 2024

Global News

British Columbia’s energy minister is “confident” the province is “taking all the steps that need to be taken” to prepare for what could be another drought-stricken summer followed by more dry summers for years to come. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: The City of Tomorrow Will Run on Your Toilet Water

PUBLISHED: 13 February 2024      Last Edited: 13 February 2024

WIRED

Researchers are finding better ways to extract drinking water, compost, and even energy from wastewater. It’s not gross. It’s science. Click here to continue reading

Water levels, capacity among top priorities at Lethbridge treatment plant

PUBLISHED: 13 February 2024      Last Edited: 13 February 2024

CTV News

The City of Lethbridge is actively monitoring low water levels in the Oldman River but production at its water treatment plant hasn’t slowed down. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: New study sheds new light on forests’ role in climate and water cycle

PUBLISHED: 13 February 2024      Last Edited: 13 February 2024

Science Daily

Forests, which cover a third of Earth’s land surface, are pivotal in carbon storage and the water cycle, though the full scope of their impact remains to be fully understood. In a new study, researchers provide new insights into the complex role forests play in the climate system and water cycle. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Warmer water may help rivers keep antimicrobial resistance at bay

PUBLISHED: 13 February 2024      Last Edited: 13 February 2024

Science Daily

Antimicrobial resistant genes (ARGs) from wastewater can end up in natural biofilms in rivers, but they may not stick around very long. This week in mSphere, researchers report that after ARGs are introduced to a river they invade and initially join natural biofilms. Click here to continue reading

Water levels, capacity among top priorities at Lethbridge treatment plant

PUBLISHED: 13 February 2024      Last Edited: 13 February 2024

CTV News

The City of Lethbridge is actively monitoring low water levels in the Oldman River but production at its water treatment plant hasn’t slowed down. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: New study sheds new light on forests’ role in climate and water cycle

PUBLISHED: 13 February 2024      Last Edited: 13 February 2024

Science Daily

Forests, which cover a third of Earth’s land surface, are pivotal in carbon storage and the water cycle, though the full scope of their impact remains to be fully understood. In a new study, researchers provide new insights into the complex role forests play in the climate system and water cycle. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Warmer water may help rivers keep antimicrobial resistance at bay

PUBLISHED: 13 February 2024      Last Edited: 13 February 2024

Science Daily

Antimicrobial resistant genes (ARGs) from wastewater can end up in natural biofilms in rivers, but they may not stick around very long. This week in mSphere, researchers report that after ARGs are introduced to a river they invade and initially join natural biofilms. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: We Wai Kai Guardians are ‘testing the water’ to prepare for climate change

PUBLISHED: 12 February 2024      Last Edited: 12 February 2024

ChekNews

We Wai Kai Land Gaurdian Shane Pollard is concerned about climate change and the impact it will have on his community. To be proactive as the planet warms, the We Wai Kai First Nation’s land guardians are partnering with other local groups to map and monitor wetlands, watersheds, and streams on Quadra Island as the summer gets drier. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Rio Tinto wrangles investors over water contamination claims

PUBLISHED: 12 February 2024      Last Edited: 12 February 2024

Reuters

Global mining giant Rio Tinto (RIO.AX), opens new tab, which sparked outrage after destroying an ancient Indigenous site in Australia in 2020, faces new pressure from socially conscious investors and lenders, this time on water practices at two of its mines. Click here to continue reading

N.B. conservation group urges faster action to protect water and shorelines

PUBLISHED: 12 February 2024      Last Edited: 12 February 2024

CBC

The goals of the plan are to protect drinking water and ecosystems, improve understanding about water and work co-operatively on management. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Water bosses in England and Wales face bonus bans for illegal sewage discharges

PUBLISHED: 12 February 2024      Last Edited: 12 February 2024

The Guardian

The environment secretary, Steve Barclay, is proposing to block payouts to executives of firms that commit criminal acts of water pollution, starting with bonuses in the 2024-25 financial year from April. Click here to continue reading

‘Is it equitable?’ Okotoks mayor questions Calgary’s water conservation

PUBLISHED: 12 February 2024      Last Edited: 12 February 2024

Calgary Herald

Okotoks Mayor Tanya Thorn said it’s time for Calgary and other communities to get as serious about reducing water use as her community. Click here to continue reading

Our federation helped make Alberta rich in water. Now, that dam is breaking

PUBLISHED: 12 February 2024      Last Edited: 12 February 2024

The Globe and Mail

The movement of Alberta separatism seeks, in part, to erode Ottawa’s jurisdiction over natural-resource management in the province. But what that movement forgets is that Alberta was only able to achieve its prosperity – which really began with water – because of its position as a province within a nation. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: How One of the Nation’s Fastest Growing Counties Plans to Find Water in the Desert

PUBLISHED: 12 February 2024      Last Edited: 12 February 2024

Inside Climate News

The booming population in the southwest corner of Utah has tapped out the Virgin River and its dreams of piping water from Lake Powell are running dry with the reservoir, leaving wastewater recycling and conservation as the best options to keep watering the growth. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: EPA Reports ‘Widespread Noncompliance’ With the Nation’s First Regulations on Toxic Coal Ash

PUBLISHED: 12 February 2024      Last Edited: 12 February 2024

Inside Climate News

“Groundwater contamination at coal ash disposal facilities is a significant concern,” an EPA enforcement alert states. “Approximately 150 facilities have detected groundwater contamination from metals and other inorganic compounds released through coal ash disposal and EPA believes that number will continue to increase.”. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Protecting New York’s freshwater wetlands is now more important than ever

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2024      Last Edited: 09 February 2024

Riverkeeper

Though wetlands provide critical habitat, reduce flood risk, improve water quality, and purify drinking water, they continuously fall victim to unchecked development, pollution, degradation, and climate change impacts. Wetlands are also at risk due to shifting federal protections. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Utah’s Great Salt Lake To Receive Influx of Water

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2024      Last Edited: 09 February 2024

Newsweek

Utah Lake is a freshwater lake in the Utah Valley. The Jordan River is the lake’s only outlet, and a tributary of the Great Salt Lake.Utah Lake has now reached near-maximum capacity, standing at 99.5 percent, data from the Utah Division of Water Resources reported. Click here to continue reading

A shallow, salty lake in B.C. could point to origins of life on Earth

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2024      Last Edited: 09 February 2024

CBC

Researchers found Last Chance Lake has right ingredients for formation of early life. Scientists have mused for centuries over questions about the origins of life on Earth. As it turns out, the answer may lie in a small, unassuming lake in British Columbia’s Interior. Click here to continue reading

B.C. hosting 30 workshops to help farmers prepare for summer droughts

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2024      Last Edited: 09 February 2024

Global News

Drought conditions have significant impacts on communities around the province, specifically for farmers who are extremely dependent on water and water management. To help B.C. farmers, the province is hosting more than 30 in-person workshops. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Nevada jury awards $130M to 5 people who had liver damage after drinking bottled water

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2024      Last Edited: 09 February 2024

Financial Post

A Nevada jury has awarded about $130 million in damages in a lawsuit filed by five people who suffered liver damage after drinking bottled water marketed by a Las Vegas-based company. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: The largest body of water west of the Mississippi disappeared 130 years ago. Now it’s back

PUBLISHED: 08 February 2024      Last Edited: 08 February 2024

Phys.org

The San Joaquin Valley of California, despite supplying a significant percentage of the country’s food, is nevertheless a dry, arid place. Until the late 19th century, the San Joaquin Valley held a lake more than 100 miles long and over 30 miles wide. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: ‘An exceptional solution’: Catalonia is bringing in water by boat to top up dwindling supplies

PUBLISHED: 08 February 2024      Last Edited: 08 February 2024

EuroNews Green

Environmental groups have said this unusual solution doesn’t solve long-term water management problems. To make up for extreme shortages, the Spanish government is planning to ship desalinated water to Catalonia. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: How our drinking water could come from thin air

PUBLISHED: 08 February 2024      Last Edited: 08 February 2024

BBC News


In the dry, desert air of Las Vegas, it seems strange to be talking about a plentiful source of water all around us. Southern Nevada is in the grip of one of the worst droughts it has experienced in recorded history, leading to water shortages and restrictions on use. So, in water-stressed areas such as this, the prospect of wringing water from thin air is an appealing prospect. Click here to continue reading

B.C.’s lack of snow foretells summer drought woes

PUBLISHED: 08 February 2024      Last Edited: 08 February 2024

National Observer

The persistent lack of snow across much of B.C. is setting the stage for a possible repeat of the record-breaking provincewide drought experienced last summer, watershed experts worry. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: First Nations Drinking Water Settlement Claims Closing in March

PUBLISHED: 08 February 2024      Last Edited: 08 February 2024

Water Canada

Eligible First Nations communities and individuals have until March 7, 2024, to submit a claim under the First Nations Drinking Water Settlement. “We encourage those eligible to submit their claim right away so they can be compensated for their harms from living under a long-term drinking water advisory. For those who need help filling out their Claim Form, there are free resources available, including a Claims Assessment Tool and interactive guides, which can be found on the First Nations Drinking Water website. Click here to continue reading

Why We Can’t Take Clean, Safe Water for Granted

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2024      Last Edited: 07 February 2024

The Tyee

We still like to think of B.C. as a “rainforest,” with more water than we know what to do with. But we’ve seen recurring droughts, and last summer’s affected the whole province. Click here to continue reading

Why does Winterlude use drinking water to build the Snowflake Kingdom?

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2024      Last Edited: 07 February 2024

CBC

Some environmentalists are asking why millions of litres of municipal drinking water are used to build the Snowflake Kingdom in Gatineau’s Jacques-Cartier Park during the annual Winterlude festival, instead of drawing it from the nearby Ottawa River. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Ghana: Kumasi city’s unplanned boom is destroying two rivers – sewage, heavy metals and chemical pollution detected

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2024      Last Edited: 07 February 2024

The Conversation – Africa

Ghana’s urban population has more than tripled in the past three decades, from 4 million to nearly 14 million people. Competition for land in cities has increased among various land uses. These trends have led to encroachment in ecologically sensitive areas such as wetlands. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Nevada Court Rules Groundwater and Surface Water are the Same

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2024      Last Edited: 07 February 2024
Water Canada
The Nevada Supreme Court ruled today that the state has a right to manage groundwater for the preservation of senior water rights and the public interest, including wildlife. Today’s decision in the Lower White River Flow System case will help determine the future of water management in the driest state in the union. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Yes, the Los Angeles River is dramatically full. But it’s just ‘doing its job’

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2024      Last Edited: 07 February 2024

The Guardian

Media images of rising waters may seem alarming – but that’s pretty much what the channel is supposed to look like in heavy rain. “As long as the river doesn’t go over its banks and flood the surrounding neighborhoods, this is the modern LA River doing its job,” Christensen said. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: The good news, bad news on California’s water supplies, drought after record rainfall

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2024      Last Edited: 07 February 2024

Daily Bulletin

The latest storm is likely to reduce water demand for weeks and state records show that both rainfall and snowpack levels are now much improved. But in not-so-great news, water experts say conditions in this “Pineapple Express” storm haven’t been ideal for bolstering the state’s water supply. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: What is an atmospheric river? With flooding and mudslides in California, a hydrologist explains the good and bad of these storms and how they’re changing

PUBLISHED: 06 February 2024      Last Edited: 06 February 2024

The Conversation – United States

An atmospheric river is a narrow corridor or filament of concentrated water vapor transported in the atmosphere. It’s like a river in the sky that can be 1,000 miles long. On average, atmospheric rivers have about twice the regular flow of the Amazon River. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: How demand for lithium batteries could drain America’s water resources

PUBLISHED: 06 February 2024      Last Edited: 06 February 2024

PBS News Hour

The push towards a green, battery-powered future comes with a major tradeoff. Student reporters from the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at Arizona State University discovered that increased mining for lithium inside the United States will stress freshwater aquifers. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: California Flooding Video Shows ‘Damaging Mudflow’ Strike Los Angeles

PUBLISHED: 06 February 2024      Last Edited: 06 February 2024

Newsweek

As heavy rain lashed California during a fierce winter storm, forecasters’ worst fears began to materialize with mudflows and landslides hitting Los Angeles. Shocked bystanders and storm-chasers documented the damage as mud, rocks and vegetation were swept down hillsides and mountains to deluge the land below. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: How socially and culturally diverse Minnesotans value water

PUBLISHED: 06 February 2024      Last Edited: 06 February 2024

Phys.org

Understanding how different communities value water and prioritize its protection is critical to effective policy and governance. While some values are universal—safe drinking water, for example—other values and priorities vary by sociocultural identities. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: As Use of AI Soars, So Does the Energy and Water It Requires

PUBLISHED: 06 February 2024      Last Edited: 06 February 2024

Yale Environment 360

Generative artificial intelligence uses massive amounts of energy for computation and data storage and billions of gallons of water to cool the equipment at data centers. Now, legislators and regulators — in the U.S. and the EU — are starting to demand accountability. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: ‘A new climate reality’: Spain’s drought-stricken villages have been in crisis mode for months

PUBLISHED: 06 February 2024      Last Edited: 06 February 2024

EuroNews Green

Thousands living in small communities that depend on wells which are now running dry are experiencing difficulties getting water fit for consumption. “I don’t think we are aware of what is in store for all of us. … People don’t want to hear about there being a lack of water.”. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: DRC’s worst floods in decades leave tens of thousands in temporary shelter

PUBLISHED: 05 February 2024      Last Edited: 05 February 2024

The Guardian

Tens of thousands of people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are living in temporary accommodation and waiting for government help after the country experienced its worst flooding in six decades. Click here to continue reading

B.C. oil and gas producers warned of potential water shortages in drought-stricken areas

PUBLISHED: 05 February 2024      Last Edited: 05 February 2024

CBC

The agency overseeing oil and gas producers in British Columbia is warning of potential water shortages in 2024. The B.C. Energy Regulator (BCER), formerly the B.C. Oil and Gas Commission, says persistent drought last summer and fall in the northern part of the province continue to negatively affect streamflows and groundwater, with snowpack levels at last reading only 72 per cent of the historical average. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: ‘Life-threatening’ storm system batters California, with flooding and high winds

PUBLISHED: 05 February 2024      Last Edited: 05 February 2024

The Guardian

First-ever hurricane-force wind warning along coast, with millions of people under flood watches and power out for close to a million. An enormous atmospheric river-fueled storm unleashed rain and furious winds across California on Sunday, leaving destruction and hazards in its wake. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Sask. irrigators keep their eyes on water supply

PUBLISHED: 05 February 2024      Last Edited: 05 February 2024

The Western Producer

River flow, low mountain snowpack and reservoirs struggling to fill in southern Alberta haven’t escaped the attention of irrigators in Saskatchewan as the traditional wet spring becomes critical. Mountain snowpack levels across Alberta’s Eastern Slopes as well as those in Montana that feed into the St. Mary and Milk rivers are well below normal. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Our water is under threat. A new global initiative wants to find solutions

PUBLISHED: 05 February 2024      Last Edited: 05 February 2024

National Observer

As climate change threatens global water systems, a new research initiative aims to leverage Indigenous expertise to manage cross-border water resources. Climate change puts people’s access to water in jeopardy. Extreme weather events like floods and droughts are becoming more frequent and extreme, damaging infrastructure and affecting water quality. Often, rivers, lakes and bodies of water affected by these crises cross international borders. Click here to continue reading

Watersheds Canada Recognizes World Wetlands Day

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2024      Last Edited: 02 February 2024

Water Canada

As wetlands cross people’s mind on World Wetlands Day (February 2, 2024), perhaps it is because, at some point in life, they have personally experienced one of the greatest ecological wonders of the world. Canada is home to twenty-five percent of the world’s wetlands. Unfortunately, however, wetlands continue to be degraded or simply lost forever. Click here to continue reading

Okanagan Falls Wetland is Leading the Way in Environmental Sustainability

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2024      Last Edited: 02 February 2024

Water Canada

An Okanagan Falls wetland is leading the way in environmental sustainability and community well-being. Located next to the Okanagan Falls Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), the wetland showcases how thoughtful planning and environmentally friendly initiatives can lead to significant positive impacts. Click here to continue reading

Billions of litres of water are used yearly by Quebec’s mining and metal industry, data reveals

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2024      Last Edited: 02 February 2024

CBC

Quebec has lifted the veil of secrecy around the province’s biggest water users, revealing that billions of litres of water are withdrawn yearly by the mining and metal industry, along with pulp and paper manufacturing. The data dump, which includes records going back a decade, also lists golf clubs, ski hills, water bottling plants and food processors among the companies that are withdrawing tens of millions — sometimes hundreds of millions — of litres in a year. Click here to continue reading

Don Lands Sees First Flow of Water

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2024      Last Edited: 02 February 2024

Water Canada

One of North America’s largest water infrastructure projects reached a major milestone on Wednesday, January 31, when pumps were activated for the first time to begin pushing water into the new Don River valley. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: EU Policy. Pharma and cosmetics industries to pay for wastewater treatment

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2024      Last Edited: 01 February 2024

EuroNews Green

The pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries will have to bear at least 80% of the costs linked to cleaning harmful substances they discharge into urban wastewater, following an inter-institutional agreement reached in Brussels on January 29. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Barcelona declares drought emergency, with big fines for breaking water rules

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2024      Last Edited: 01 February 2024

EuroNews Green

After months of warnings, authorities in Catalonia have declared a drought emergency. The region is in the midst of the worst drought since records began. From Friday, February 2, 89% of the Catalan population, including Barcelona, will be under strict water restrictions. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Opinion: Canada’s wetlands need to be conserved and restored

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2024      Last Edited: 01 February 2024

Calgary Herald

Friday is World Wetlands Day. While many of these beautiful places are frozen over this time of year, this occasion gives us a chance to reflect on their importance and the never-ending services they offer of a hopeful future for our communities. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Groundwater decline is global but not universal

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2024      Last Edited: 01 February 2024

Nature

Measurements of groundwater levels in 170,000 wells reveal the global extent of groundwater decline. But the data also show that such depletion is not inevitable in a changing climate, providing hope for a resilient water future. Click here to continue reading

Drought conditions spark government action, raise questions over wildfire response

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2024      Last Edited: 01 February 2024

CTV News

With parts of Alberta gripped by severe drought, fire chiefs across the province are asking the government to share its strategy for fighting wildfires this year. Click here to continue reading

Water-sharing negotiations start on Feb. 1

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2024      Last Edited: 01 February 2024

Government of Alberta

Alberta’s Drought Command Team has been authorized to start negotiations with water licence holders to strike water-sharing agreements to mitigate the risk of drought. Alberta relies on melting snow and rain for all of its water. This winter, snowpack is below average, rivers are at record low levels and multiple reservoirs remain well below capacity. Click here to continue reading

18 C in Abbotsford as atmospheric river smashes B.C. heat records, brings heavy rain

PUBLISHED: 31 January 2024      Last Edited: 31 January 2024

The Canadian Press

Unseasonable warmth brought by an atmospheric river has shattered records — some almost a century old — at more than 30 B.C. locations, with the mercury passing 18 C in the Lower Mainland. Environment Canada says the daily high temperature at Vancouver’s airport hit 14.3 C on Monday, breaking the previous record of 13.3 C set in 1940. Click here to continue reading

Contamination from old Alberta Rockies coal mines raises cleanup questions

PUBLISHED: 31 January 2024      Last Edited: 31 January 2024

The Canadian Press

A former coal mine in the Alberta Rockies is releasing selenium at rates more than dozens of times higher than federal and provincial guidelines, while another periodically disgorges water so iron-heavy it stains local creeks orange, research says. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Senegal’s pink lake is on the verge of disappearing – how to protect it

PUBLISHED: 31 January 2024      Last Edited: 31 January 2024

The Conversation – Africa

Lake Retba, better known as Lac Rose (the Pink Lake), is located around 35km from the city of Dakar, Senegal. It sits in a depression with a shoreline 6.5 metres below sea level.
The lake is isolated from the sea by about 1km of sand dunes. Its fresh water comes from the seasonal water table in the dunes, which are higher than the lake. Thus the sea provides most of the lake’s water and all of its salt. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Spain drought: Ebro Delta workers are searching for ‘equilibrium’ as water runs out

PUBLISHED: 31 January 2024      Last Edited: 31 January 2024

EuroNews Green

 

In the wetlands of Catalonia, farmers and environmentalists are working together to adapt to the region’s longest drought. One of Western Europe’s largest wetlands: the Ebro River Delta. It’s not only a habitat for many thousands of species but also serves as a source of hydroelectricity, eco-tourism and – most economically important – rice cultivation. Click here to continue reading

Epcor issues mandatory ban on non-essential water use

PUBLISHED: 30 January 2024      Last Edited: 30 January 2024

CTV News

Epcor issued a mandatory ban on non-essential water use as a result of an issue at a treatment plant. The ban impacts Edmonton, Sherwood Park, St. Albert, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Leduc, Beaumont and Fort Saskatchewan. Businesses that use a large volume of water, such as laundromats and car washes, are being asked to halt water use entirely. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Toxic landslide threatens Danish village as argument over clean up costs escalates

PUBLISHED: 30 January 2024      Last Edited: 30 January 2024

EuroNews Green

Authorities in Denmark are working against the clock to stop a slow-moving landslide of contaminated soil from reaching a nearby water source. Public officials and the company that operated the site are arguing over who should pay for the massive cleanup. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Dodging Day Zero: Drought, Adaptation And Inequality In Cape Town

PUBLISHED: 30 January 2024      Last Edited: 30 January 2024

University of California Television (UCTV)

Filmed presentation: In the coming decades, individuals around the world must adapt to changing environmental conditions, often driven by climate change. Adaptation requires significant resources, prompting the question of whether existing economic and social inequities may be exacerbated when adaptation become accessible to some, but not others. Click here to continue reading

Flood, avalanche risk still high across southwestern B.C. after heavy rain

PUBLISHED: 30 January 2024      Last Edited: 30 January 2024

CBC

Flood and avalanche risks remain elevated across British Columbia’s South Coast, where atmospheric rivers continue to bring heavy rains along with unseasonably warm temperatures. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: 83% of English rivers have evidence of high pollution from sewage and agriculture

PUBLISHED: 30 January 2024      Last Edited: 30 January 2024

The Guardian

Eighty-three per cent of English rivers contain evidence of high pollution caused by sewage and agricultural waste, according to the largest citizen science water testing project ever to take place in the UK. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Global Groundwater Declining Rapidly

PUBLISHED: 29 January 2024      Last Edited: 29 January 2024

Water Canada

Groundwater is rapidly declining across the globe, often at accelerating rates. Writing in the journal Nature, UC Santa Barbara researchers present the largest assessment of groundwater levels around the world, spanning nearly 1,700 aquifers. In addition to raising the alarm over declining water resources, the work offers instructive examples of where things are going well, and how groundwater depletion can be solved. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Water, water everywhere and now we may have drops to drink

PUBLISHED: 29 January 2024      Last Edited: 29 January 2024

Science Daily

Researchers have achieved a major breakthrough in Redox Flow Desalination (RFD), an emerging electrochemical technique that can turn seawater into potable drinking water and also store affordable renewable energy. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: ‘We can’t engineer our way out of this’: how to protect flood-hit Severn Valley

PUBLISHED: 29 January 2024      Last Edited: 29 January 2024

The Guardian

Tens of millions have been spent on human-made defences over the years, but the impact of the climate crisis means flooding is inevitable. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: 2020 US rule dramatically deregulated wetlands, streams and drinking water

PUBLISHED: 29 January 2024      Last Edited: 29 January 2024

Science Daily

New research used machine learning to more accurately predict which waterways are protected by the Clean Water Act. The analysis found that a 2020 Trump administration rule removed Clean Water Act protection for one-fourth of US wetlands and one-fifth of US streams, and also deregulated 30% of watersheds that supply drinking water to household taps. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Menindee fish kills: inconsistent pesticide levels sparks calls for review of water testing methods

PUBLISHED: 29 January 2024      Last Edited: 29 January 2024

The Guardian

Experts are calling for more sensitive water-quality testing in the Darling-Baaka River amid concerns that pesticides could be contributing to poor conditions, blue-green algae blooms and fish deaths. It follows two of the state’s top scientific bodies publishing test results from water samples taken near Menindee in far western New South Wales which contained inconsistent results. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Researchers advocate for sustainable logging to safeguard against global flood risks

PUBLISHED: 29 January 2024      Last Edited: 29 January 2024

Science Daily

Dr. Alila says the probabilistic framework is designed to understand and predict, for instance, how much of the 2021 Fraser Valley floods could be attributed to climate change, land use change or logging. But the risk of flooding is influenced by many things, such as how much snow is on the ground, whether it’s melting or not, how much rain is falling, and the characteristics of the landscape itself. The approach also can be extended to investigate the causes of flood risk in other cities and regions. Click here to continue reading

Atmospheric rivers swamp B.C. coast, melting snow and triggering flood advisories

PUBLISHED: 29 January 2024      Last Edited: 29 January 2024

The Canadian Press

Rainfall and flood advisories remain in effect for parts of Metro Vancouver and the Sea to Sky region as balmy weather melts any sign of heavy snowfall earlier this month. Environment Canada forecasts temperatures five to 10 degrees above normal. Click here to continue reading

Drought in Western Canada impacting hydropower production as reservoirs run low

PUBLISHED: 29 January 2024      Last Edited: 29 January 2024

The Canadian Press

Two hydro-rich provinces are being forced to import power from other jurisdictions due to severe drought in Western Canada. Both B.C. and Manitoba, where the vast majority of power is hydroelectric, are experiencing low reservoir levels that have negatively affected electricity production this fall and winter. Click here to continue reading

Nunavut needs more housing, but in the capital, that can’t happen without more water

PUBLISHED: 26 January 2024      Last Edited: 26 January 2024

The Canadian Press

The mayor of Nunavut’s capital says the city’s housing crisis cannot be solved unless another crisis is dealt with first. Iqaluit doesn’t have access to the water it needs to support a growing population, says the mayor. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Humans are depleting groundwater worldwide, but there are ways to replenish it

PUBLISHED: 26 January 2024      Last Edited: 26 January 2024

The Conversation – United States

In a newly published study, our team of data scientists, water specialists and policy experts compiled the first global-scale dataset of well water levels. We analyzed millions of groundwater level measurements in 170,000 wells located in over 40 countries and mapped how groundwater levels have changed over time. Click here to continue reading

Attawapiskat member files UN human rights complaint over decades-long struggle for clean drinking water

PUBLISHED: 26 January 2024      Last Edited: 26 January 2024

IndigiNews

An Attawapiskat member has submitted a 500-page human rights complaint to the United Nations over his First Nation’s lack of access to clean drinking water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: BHP and Vale ordered to pay $15bn in damages for 2015 Brazil dam collapse

PUBLISHED: 26 January 2024      Last Edited: 26 January 2024

The Guardian

The dam collapse in the south-eastern city of Mariana caused a giant mudslide that killed 19 people and severely polluted the Rio Doce River, compromising the waterway to its outlet in the Atlantic Ocean. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Paper provides a clearer picture of severe hydro hazards

PUBLISHED: 26 January 2024      Last Edited: 26 January 2024

Science Daily

A new study now provides a global examination of drought-pluvial volatility — or the tendency to shift from one weather extreme to another. Click here to continue reading

City of Lethbridge opens water conservation survey

PUBLISHED: 26 January 2024      Last Edited: 26 January 2024

CTV News

Lethbridge residents can now fill out a water conservation survey conducted by the City of Lethbridge. The city is hoping to hear how residents conserve water and ideas for how it can reduce water usage. Click here to continue reading

Prairie water users watch mountain snowpack

PUBLISHED: 26 January 2024      Last Edited: 26 January 2024

The Western Producer

Officials say southern Alberta will be in good shape even if precipitation and runoff capture on the Oldman and St. Mary rivers are at median levels, but low levels could lead to a worst-case scenario. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Project to help water users improve watershed planning

PUBLISHED: 26 January 2024      Last Edited: 26 January 2024

The Western Producer

The organization that represents Alberta’s irrigation districts is spearheading a project that will better allow stakeholders in the South Saskatchewan River Basin to improve watershed planning. The project will use the South Saskatchewan River Operational Model (SSROM) to determine how to best develop infrastructure to benefit Albertans, said Margo Jarvis Redelback, executive director of the Alberta Irrigation Districts Association. Click here to continue reading

Dry January: why a dash of snow and rain can’t solve B.C.’s water woes

PUBLISHED: 25 January 2024      Last Edited: 25 January 2024

The Narwhal

B.C. has released its “Snow survey and water supply bulletin,” which shows the province entering 2024 with barely half its usual snowpack. That’s a provincial average; in many places the situation was far worse, with 15 snow stations recording all-time lows as of January 1, most of them in the interior. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Global warming – not El Niño – was primary cause of unprecedented Amazon drought, study finds

PUBLISHED: 25 January 2024      Last Edited: 25 January 2024

EuroNews Green

Human-induced global warming, and not El Niño, was the primary driver of last year’s severe drought in the Amazon, researchers said on Wednesday. Both climate change and El Niño contributed about equally to a reduction in rainfall. But higher global temperatures were the biggest reason for the drought, according to World Weather Attribution. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: ‘We cannot be cowards’: the Brazilian village fighting for the right to have water

PUBLISHED: 25 January 2024      Last Edited: 25 January 2024

The Guardian

Latin America’s water wars: In a struggle that has already cost one life, a community founded by those who fled slavery is fighting to save its access to water and way of life against encroaching farmers. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Solving the Mysteries of the Water Cycle with Cutting-edge Technology in Northern Finland

PUBLISHED: 25 January 2024      Last Edited: 25 January 2024

Water Canada

In the remote research area in Oulanka, Finland, tubes and sensors crisscross out of a telephone booth-like measuring room. Every minute, they collect samples and measurement data from inside the snow cover, which are immediately analysed using state-of-the-art technology in the booth. The measurements aim to provide information on snow depth, temperature, density and evaporation using new technology. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Minister vows to end water firms’ pollution self-monitoring in England

PUBLISHED: 25 January 2024      Last Edited: 25 January 2024

The Guardian

The environment secretary has told water companies in England that they will no longer be able to monitor and report on pollution from their own treatment works.
Steve Barclay told the privatised industry he would put an end to operator self-monitoring in a toughening of the regulatory approach. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Devastating drought in Amazon result of climate crisis, study shows

PUBLISHED: 25 January 2024      Last Edited: 25 January 2024

The Guardian

The climate crisis turned the drought that struck the Amazon rainforest in 2023 into a devastating event, a study has found.
The drought was the worst recorded in many places and hit the maximum “exceptional” level on the scientific scale. Without planet-warming emissions from the burning of oil, gas and coal, the drought would have been far less extreme, the analysis found. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Britain is at bursting point and its flood barriers need to be updated

PUBLISHED: 24 January 2024      Last Edited: 24 January 2024

The Conversation – United Kingdom

Flooding is the top environmental hazard identified in the UK’s National Risk Register, after a pandemic. Around one in six homes are currently at risk of flooding – a value likely to increase. In the record-breaking stormy winter of 2013/2014 the Thames Barrier closed 50 times, equal to the maintenance limit. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Injectable water filtration system could improve access to clean drinking water around the world

PUBLISHED: 24 January 2024      Last Edited: 24 January 2024

Science Daily

More than 2 billion people, approximately a quarter of the world’s population, lack access to clean drinking water. A new, portable and affordable water filtration solution created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin aims to change that. A new portable filtration system collects dirty water with a syringe and injects it into a hydrogel filter that weeds out nearly all tiny particles. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Largest Dam Removal in U.S. History Begins

PUBLISHED: 24 January 2024      Last Edited: 24 January 2024

Water Canada

The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) initiated the U.S.’s largest drawdown process in its history by opening the low-level outlet tunnel in the Iron Gate Dam earlier this week. Drawdown refers to the slow draining of the water in the reservoirs, which will be lowered in a controlled manner through tunnels located at the base of the dams. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Reservoir water levels low despite widespread flooding

PUBLISHED: 24 January 2024      Last Edited: 24 January 2024

BBC News

Residents are questioning why a reservoir’s water levels appear low despite the region experiencing heavy rain and severe flooding. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: An ancient system that could bring water to dry areas

PUBLISHED: 24 January 2024      Last Edited: 24 January 2024

The Conversation – Africa

Some of Africa’s dry areas face serious water shortages due to minimal rainfall. An ancient system of drawing water from aquifers, the “qanat system”, could help. Gaathier Mahed, an environmental scientist and expert on the management of groundwater, has studied the feasibility of these systems. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Congo’s blackwater Ruki River is a major transporter of forest carbon – new study

PUBLISHED: 24 January 2024      Last Edited: 24 January 2024

The Conversation – Africa

The results of this study show that the Ruki is a major contributor of dissolved carbon to the Congo River, and that the majority of this carbon is sourced from the leaching of forest vegetation and soils. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Heavy rains tarnish San Diego’s reputation for ideal weather

PUBLISHED: 24 January 2024      Last Edited: 24 January 2024

Reuters

San Diego, renowned for its mild, sunny weather, was mopping up on Tuesday after the heaviest rainfall ever recorded in the city in the month of January, a deluge that washed away parked cars, flooded homes and closed a stretch of highway. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Slovenia was devastated by flooding in 2023 – how is it preparing for extreme rain in the future?

PUBLISHED: 23 January 2024      Last Edited: 23 January 2024

EuroNews Green

Slovenia is raising levees and levies in a nationwide effort to become resilient to heavy rainfall and flash flooding. Climate Now reports from the riverside on the works underway and offers insight on the latest Copernicus climate data. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Iconic fishing shacks in Portland, Maine, destroyed as coast sees historic water levels

PUBLISHED: 23 January 2024      Last Edited: 23 January 2024

abcNEWS

Iconic fishing shacks in Portland, Maine, were washed away on Saturday when the coast saw record water levels, as storms sweep across the country. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Risks and opportunities of solar-powered groundwater irrigation

PUBLISHED: 23 January 2024      Last Edited: 23 January 2024

EurekAlert!

The declining cost of solar technologies and growing government commitments to clean energy are driving a boom in the use of solar-powered groundwater irrigation in low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs). This has led to more than 500,000 solar pumps across South Asia and an estimated similar number installed across Sub-Saharan Africa over the last decade. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: How California Reservoir Water Levels Changed After Atmospheric Rivers

PUBLISHED: 23 January 2024      Last Edited: 23 January 2024

Newsweek

One reservoir in northern California rose by 5 feet after two atmospheric rivers supplemented the water levels. An atmospheric river is a “long, narrow region in the atmosphere—like rivers in the sky—that transport most of the water vapor outside of the tropics,” according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Satellite Images Show China’s Dam Threatening Neighbors’ Fresh Water Supply

PUBLISHED: 23 January 2024      Last Edited: 23 January 2024

Newsweek

China appears to have completed the construction of a new dam in the country’s southwestern border regions, a project that could have far-reaching strategic implications for its southern neighbors India and Nepal, according to new satellite imagery. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Mozambique’s cyclone flooding was devastating to animals – we studied how body size affected survival

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

The Conversation – Africa

When it comes to natural hazards, scientists think that traits such as body size, dispersal ability and habitat preference may be important in determining how vulnerable animals are. But it’s seldom possible to test these ideas. The research that was taking place in Gorongosa National Park at the time of Cyclone Idai provided the perfect opportunity to investigate this. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Why are floods in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal so devastating? Urban planning expert explains

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

The Conversation – Africa

The devastation caused by the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa demonstrates again that the country is not moving fast enough to adopt appropriate urban planning. It should be integrating risk assessment and management in the design and development of cities. This is becoming more urgent as the frequency of floods increases. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Colorado Town Appoints Legal Guardians to Implement the Rights of a Creek and a Watershed

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

Inside Climate News

Systemic roadblocks in the U.S. legal system have thwarted efforts to advance the rights of nature movement. The Colorado advocates are testing a new approach. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Another Hot, Dry Summer May Push Parts of Texas to the Brink

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

Inside Climate News

Two consecutive summers of brutal heat and drought have left some parts of Texas with notably low water supplies going into 2024. A wet year or a well-placed hurricane could quickly pull these regions back from the brink. But winter rains have disappointed so far. Click here to continue reading

Athabasca Chief Allan Adam consulting with Ottawa on First Nations Clean Water Act

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

Edmonton Journal

Water — and last year’s tailings fluid leaks from Imperial Oil’s Kearl oilsands mine — were top of mind when Indigenous leaders and technicians from around Alberta met with the federal minister of Indigenous services this week in Edmonton. Click here to continue reading

Farmers in Alberta face growing risk of soil erosion events as drought persists

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

Global News

Nearly a century after the mass agricultural disaster known as the Dirty ’30s, drought conditions on the Prairies are once again raising the risk that farmers’ valuable topsoil will go blowing in the wind. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Aridity Could Dry Up Southwestern Mine Proposals

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

Inside Climate News

Critical minerals for the clean energy transition are abundant in the Southwest, but the dozens of mines proposed to access them will require vast sums of water, something in short supply in the desert. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Alberta Invests in Natural Drought and Flood Protection

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

Water Canada

Watersheds are areas of land that drain rainfall and melted snow into streams, rivers, and lakes. Healthy and resilient watersheds play an important role in preventing drought, reducing the risk of floods and supporting healthy communities and ecosystems. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: No recharge: Long-term Prairie drought raises concerns over groundwater levels

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

Calgary Herald

“The lowest water levels are all in the last seven years and the levels are much lower now than they were in the ’70s and ’80s,” Pomeroy said. “It’ll be a climate signal that we’re seeing.”. Click here to continue reading

Athabasca Chief Allan Adam consulting with Ottawa on First Nations Clean Water Act

PUBLISHED: 22 January 2024      Last Edited: 22 January 2024

Edmonton Journal

Water — and last year’s tailings fluid leaks from Imperial Oil’s Kearl oilsands mine — were top of mind when Indigenous leaders and technicians from around Alberta met with the federal minister of Indigenous services this week in Edmonton. Click here to continue reading

St. Mary’s River Irrigation District’s January Water Supply Update

PUBLISHED: 19 January 2024      Last Edited: 19 January 2024

As of January 16, 2024, St. Mary’s River Irrigation District’s reservoirs are at 43% of the Full Supply Limit, headworks reservoirs at 27% and total St. Mary Project reservoirs at 34%, targeting lower winter storage levels of the Full Supply Limit

Read the 2024 Irrigation Season Water Supply Update here

Water grants now available

PUBLISHED: 19 January 2024      Last Edited: 19 January 2024

The Western Producer

The Land Stewardship Centre has opened applications for its 2024 Watershed Stewardship Grant. The grant is available to organizations in Alberta that are planning a water project, including stewardship and synergy groups, naturalist organizations, First Nations and Métis communities, recreational and community associations and other non-profits. Click here to continue reading

150 Calgary households still get drinking water through lead pipes. Half have refused replacement

PUBLISHED: 19 January 2024      Last Edited: 19 January 2024

CBC

More than three years after the City of Calgary launched its $14 million accelerated lead pipe removal program, roughly 150 households in Calgary still get their drinking water through lead pipes. Half of those households have declined replacement, often due to costs. Click here to continue reading

Feasibility study will determine the status of protecting Manitoba’s Seal River Watershed

PUBLISHED: 19 January 2024      Last Edited: 19 January 2024

Global News

A new agreement between First Nations leaders, the province of Manitoba, and the federal government will look at studying the feasibility of designated the Seal River Watershed as an Indigenous protected area. Click here to continue reading

New Sask. university program to offer irrigation training

PUBLISHED: 19 January 2024      Last Edited: 19 January 2024

The Western Producer

As plans for irrigation expansion continue in Saskatchewan and Alberta, the University of Saskatchewan is offering a new program to help agricultural professionals enhance their training in the burgeoning field. It can also be done remotely. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Efficiently moving urea out of polluted water is coming to reality

PUBLISHED: 19 January 2024      Last Edited: 19 January 2024

Science Daily

Researchers have developed a material to remove urea from water and potentially convert it into hydrogen gas. Click here to continue reading

Sask. wetland plan to have local focus

PUBLISHED: 19 January 2024      Last Edited: 19 January 2024

The Western Producer

Saskatchewan continues to wrestle with how best to allow agricultural water drainage while retaining wetlands. It would use a floor concept within the network, or a conservation and development area, to determine the wetlands that exist and how much would have to be kept to meet a certain retention goal. Click here to continue reading

Steps taken to prep for severe drought

PUBLISHED: 18 January 2024      Last Edited: 18 January 2024

East Central Alberta Review

Clive Councillors read a letter at their Jan. 8 meeting regarding a severe drought warning from Minister of Environment and Protected Areas Rebecca Schulz, that severe drought is expected in Alberta in the spring and summer of 2024 and asking municipalities to prepare. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: The drop in Panama Canal traffic due to a severe drought could cost up to $700 million

PUBLISHED: 18 January 2024      Last Edited: 18 January 2024

Western Investor

A severe drought that began last year has forced authorities to slash ship crossings by 36% in the Panama Canal, one of the world’s most important trade routes. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Econse helps Round Table Brewery launch with on-site, sustainable, wastewater treatment

PUBLISHED: 18 January 2024      Last Edited: 18 January 2024

Water Canada

“Operating sustainably certainly isn’t the simplest choice, but in our mind it was the only choice,” says Ricardo Petroni, of Round Table Brewery. “We’re part of this community, so protecting its resources is a responsibility we take seriously. When it came to our wastewater, Econse was the perfect choice. Their system fits in the brewery, is simple to operate, and allows us to produce great beer without negatively impacting water in the region.”. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: A new, rigorous assessment of OpenET accuracy for supporting satellite-based water management

PUBLISHED: 18 January 2024      Last Edited: 18 January 2024

Science Daily

Sustainable water management is an increasing concern in arid regions around the world, and scientists and regulators are turning to remote sensing tools like OpenET to help track and manage water resources. his tool has the potential to revolutionize water management, allowing for field-scale operational monitoring of water use, and a new study provides a thorough analysis of the accuracy of OpenET data for various crops and natural land cover types. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: UH trains future agri-scientists to outsmart climate change threats to food crops

PUBLISHED: 17 January 2024      Last Edited: 17 January 2024

EurekAlert!

Researchers at the University of Houston are training future agricultural scientists in new methods of protecting the world’s food crops – which too often are left vulnerable to extreme weather events in these days of climate change. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Hybrid Water Systems Offer Sustainable Solution for Future Cities

PUBLISHED: 17 January 2024      Last Edited: 17 January 2024

AZoCleantech

Houston’s water and wastewater system could be more resilient with the development of hybrid urban water supply systems that combine conventional, centralized water sources with reclaimed wastewater, according to a study by Rice University engineers published in Nature Water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: HCL Group and UpLink Announce Winners of Zero Water Waste Challenge, Part of the Aquapreneur Innovation Initiative

PUBLISHED: 17 January 2024      Last Edited: 17 January 2024

Financial Post

The Aquapreneur Innovation Initiative is a five-year $15 million investment to drive freshwater sector innovation from HCL, a leading global conglomerate. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Water in Public Spaces: 15 Urban Projects That Incorporate Water Resources in Their Designs

PUBLISHED: 17 January 2024      Last Edited: 17 January 2024

ArchDaily

Water holds cultural significance in many societies, being associated with rituals and ceremonies and carrying diverse symbolic meanings. When present in urban public spaces, water-related elements also offer various benefits. Click here to continue reading

Explainer: Western Canada’s dry winter heralds worsening drought for 2024

PUBLISHED: 17 January 2024      Last Edited: 17 January 2024

Reuters

Canada’s abnormally dry winter is worsening drought conditions across the western provinces, where most of the country’s oil, gas, forest products and grain are produced. The dry winter follows Canada’s hottest summer on record, partly due to the El Niño weather phenomenon, and is raising concerns that 2024 could be another record-breaking wildfire year. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Brumadinho dam collapse: The danger emerged after the decommissioning, study reveals

PUBLISHED: 17 January 2024      Last Edited: 17 January 2024

Phys.org

A study has now shed light on the Brumadinho disaster. The scientists used numerical and analytical models to investigate the causes of the dam failure, and they have identified a physical mechanism that explains the mining accident. Click here to continue reading

Alberta’s drought could hinder Canadian beef industry’s ability to further reduce emissions

PUBLISHED: 16 January 2024      Last Edited: 16 January 2024

Calgary Herald

Canada’s beef industry has made headway on its 2030 emissions-reduction target, lowering its total emissions by 15 per cent from 2014 levels. Click here to continue reading

Alberta seeks public input on updated flood maps, even during a drought

PUBLISHED: 16 January 2024      Last Edited: 16 January 2024

Calgary Herald

Officials continue to work on updating flood mapping studies covering 1,600 kilometres of riverways in the province. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Study quantifies how aquifer depletion threatens crop yields

PUBLISHED: 16 January 2024      Last Edited: 16 January 2024

Science Daily

the depletion of groundwater — the same that many farmers rely on for irrigation — can threaten food production amid drought and drier climes. The study found that, due in part to the challenges of extracting groundwater, an aquifer’s depletion can curb crop yields even when it appears saturated enough to continue meeting the demands of irrigation. Click here to continue reading

Province plans ahead to mitigate severe drought this year — using a familiar modelling tool

PUBLISHED: 16 January 2024      Last Edited: 16 January 2024

CBC

WaterSMART Solutions, a water management consulting company will conduct drought modelling and determine how to optimize Alberta’s water supply. Using a tool called the South Saskatchewan River Operation Model (SSROM) which was utilized in the province’s 2013 flood response. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: This pristine lake has endured for 2m years. Why are its fish in crisis?

PUBLISHED: 16 January 2024      Last Edited: 16 January 2024

The Guardian

In one of the world’s oldest lakes, Hovsgol grayling, a species found only in these azure waters in Mongolia, are struggling to survive. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: The Cost of Freeing Drinking Water from ‘Forever Chemicals’

PUBLISHED: 15 January 2024      Last Edited: 15 January 2024

Undark Magazine

The EPA is set to limit PFAS in drinking water to barely detectable levels. Can water utilities meet the standard?. Click here to continue reading

Dry Ponds: A simple, yet innovative approach to flood mitigation

PUBLISHED: 15 January 2024      Last Edited: 15 January 2024

Water Canada

Whether it comes up out of the ground or falls out of the sky, it will still want to go where it’s been going for millennia. Which can be a problem when your neighbourhood used to be a lake and you have an old basement. So, what can be done?. Click here to continue reading

Metro Vancouver celebrates 100 years of providing drinking water to the region

PUBLISHED: 15 January 2024      Last Edited: 15 January 2024

Water Canada

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Greater Vancouver Water District, which has, through the collaboration of its members, consistently provided high-quality drinking water to the region’s residents. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: South West Water ‘not honest’ about drought preparations, watchdog claims

PUBLISHED: 15 January 2024      Last Edited: 15 January 2024

The Guardian

The Environment Agency (EA) told the water industry regulator Ofwat that SWW was “not honest” with regulators about the risk a drought posed to the company’s water supplies and was inadequately prepared for the heatwave. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Winters warmer than -8C are making snow disappear – and threatening Europe’s water supplies

PUBLISHED: 15 January 2024      Last Edited: 15 January 2024

EuroNews Green

“Many of the world’s most populous basins are hovering on the precipice of rapid snow declines,” concluded the study of snow amounts since 1981, published on Wednesday in the journal Nature. The study found a key threshold for the future of snowpacks in the Northern Hemisphere: -8 degrees Celsius. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Record heat in 2023 worsened global droughts, floods and wildfires

PUBLISHED: 12 January 2024      Last Edited: 12 January 2024

Science Daily

Record heat across the world profoundly impacted the global water cycle in 2023, contributing to severe storms, floods, megadroughts and bushfires, new research shows. Click here to continue reading

Agricultural drought assistance: Minister Sigurdson

PUBLISHED: 12 January 2024      Last Edited: 12 January 2024

Government of Alberta

Minister of Agriculture and Irrigation RJ Sigurdson issued the following statement on how the government is preparing to assist agricultural producers:. Click here to continue reading

Section of Banff Avenue closed due to water main break

PUBLISHED: 11 January 2024      Last Edited: 11 January 2024

CTV News

Emergency crews were called to a major water main break in the town of Banff Thursday morning. Banff is one of the many Alberta communities currently under an extreme cold warning on Thursday. Click here to continue reading

BC Hydro must pay for overcharging remote First Nations

PUBLISHED: 11 January 2024      Last Edited: 11 January 2024

National Observer

BC Hydro has been ordered to refund a small coastal First Nation more than $700,000 after unfairly charging it an extra annual fee for electricity for nearly a decade. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Thames Water bypassing local opposition in attempt to launch water recycling project

PUBLISHED: 11 January 2024      Last Edited: 11 January 2024

The Guardian

Thames Water is bypassing local democracy to attempt to push through a controversial water recycling project that campaigners say threatens to increase pollution on the river. Click here to continue reading

City of Lethbridge addressing water shortage concerns

PUBLISHED: 11 January 2024      Last Edited: 11 January 2024

CTV News

“Because we are already in such a moisture deficit in the soils, this little bit of precipitation is really not enough. We need feet and feet and feet of snow and/or lots of rain to resupply our soil water stores”. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Drought reveals sunken 11th century church as Spain battles prolonged water shortages

PUBLISHED: 11 January 2024      Last Edited: 11 January 2024

EuroNews Green

Flooded 60 years ago to form the Sau reservoir, which provides essential water supplies to the city of Barcelona, just the top of the church’s three-storey tower usually pokes up above the surface. Now, the 11th-century building stands firmly on dry land and has started to attract ‘drought tourists’. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Laid to Waste

PUBLISHED: 10 January 2024      Last Edited: 10 January 2024

Science

Ukrainian scientists are tallying the grave environmental consequences of the Kakhovka Dam disaster. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Conservation Takes Flight With Wetland Upgrades and Water Management

PUBLISHED: 10 January 2024      Last Edited: 10 January 2024

3BL CSRwire

Wetlands aren’t just for bullfrogs and cattails—they’re important for wildlife and humans alike. Two key projects emerged this year to improve the landscape for waterfowl, wildlife and surrounding communities, each with critical benefits to its respective ecosystem. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Conservative ‘failures’ have led to more sewage pollution, say water experts

PUBLISHED: 10 January 2024      Last Edited: 10 January 2024

The Guardian

Increased flooding blamed on years of government delays over ‘sponge cities’ rules. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Scientists find about a quarter million invisible nanoplastic particles in a liter of bottled water

PUBLISHED: 09 January 2024      Last Edited: 09 January 2024

The Canadian Press
The average liter of bottled water has nearly a quarter million invisible pieces of ever so tiny nanoplastics, detected and categorized for the first time by a microscope using dual lasers. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: EU Policy. Belgium urged to advance extension of water pollutant watch list

PUBLISHED: 09 January 2024      Last Edited: 09 January 2024

EuroNews Green

Belgium plans to move forward a proposal to increase the number of water pollutants subject to strict concentration limits, to include PFAS ‘forever chemicals’ and dozens of others, the EU Council presidency holder has said amid calls from civil society and industry. Click here to continue reading

Miawpukek First Nation improving water system to provide clean water to entire community

PUBLISHED: 09 January 2024      Last Edited: 09 January 2024

Water Canada

Miawpukek First Nation is embarking on a significant water system upgrade to ensure sustained access to safe and clean drinking water in the community. The installation of booster pumps and upgrades to the water treatment plant will ensure ample water pressure across the entire community. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Bottled water can contain hundreds of thousands of previously uncounted tiny plastic bits

PUBLISHED: 09 January 2024      Last Edited: 09 January 2024

Science Daily

A new microscopic technique zeroes in on the poorly explored world of nanoplastics, which can pass into blood, cells and your brain. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: How ‘wildcat’ subdivisions are making Arizona’s drought worse

PUBLISHED: 08 January 2024      Last Edited: 08 January 2024

Fast Company

When a small Arizona community called Rio Verde Foothills lost its water supply one year ago, forcing locals to skip showers and eat off paper plates, it became a poster child for unwise desert development. Click here to continue reading

 

Alberta government seeking feedback on new Edmonton-area flood maps

PUBLISHED: 08 January 2024      Last Edited: 08 January 2024

CBC

Alberta government seeking feedback on new Edmonton-area flood maps. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Heavy rain swamps much of Europe in floodwaters

PUBLISHED: 08 January 2024      Last Edited: 08 January 2024

CBC

Major rivers in England and Wales overflowed after being hit by a series of rainstorms, causing widespread flooding in the region. Britain is the latest victim of flooding, with places in France, Germany and Belgium still recovering from earlier deluges. Click here to continue reading

Gravel company fined for water discharge into McLeod River

PUBLISHED: 08 January 2024      Last Edited: 08 January 2024

Edmonton Journal

An Alberta natural resources company has been fined for pumping water from a gravel pit into a creek feeding the McLeod River 2 1/2 years ago. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Thailand tries nature-based water management to adapt to climate change

PUBLISHED: 08 January 2024      Last Edited: 08 January 2024

Mongabay 

A new report assesses the efficacy of two nature-based approaches to water management in Thailand, which represent a step away from the country’s typically top-down, hard-engineering approach and present several benefits to the environment and communities. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: English towns and villages flooded after heavy rainfall – in pictures

PUBLISHED: 08 January 2024      Last Edited: 08 January 2024

The Guardian

Hundreds of flood warnings remain in place and commuters face travel disruption on Friday after heavy rain fell across parts of the UK. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: English towns and villages flooded after heavy rainfall – in pictures

PUBLISHED: 05 January 2024      Last Edited: 05 January 2024

The Guardian

Hundreds of flood warnings remain in place and commuters face travel disruption on Friday after heavy rain fell across parts of the UK. Click here to continue reading

Alberta is already preparing for a possible drought this spring

PUBLISHED: 05 January 2024      Last Edited: 05 January 2024

CTV News

Calgary set a record for temperatures in December. Your snow shovel and booster cables may be collecting dust, but while many people are glad to avoid the hassles of winter, the warm and dry conditions are also potentially concerning. Click here to continue reading

Alberta government warning municipalities about water use this year due to drought

PUBLISHED: 05 January 2024      Last Edited: 05 January 2024

CBC

Alberta’s environment minister is reaching out to municipalities asking them to find ways to use less water this year in light of the province’s drought. Click here to continue reading

Calgary sees warmest December on record, with water shortages possible this summer

PUBLISHED: 05 January 2024      Last Edited: 05 January 2024

Calgary Herald

Calgary and other parts of Alberta are in the midst of one of the warmest and driest winters on record, prompting concerns about water supply and fire risk heading into spring and summer this year. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Cold-Water Fish Are Being Threatened in Temperate US Lakes

PUBLISHED: 04 January 2024      Last Edited: 04 January 2024

Newsweek

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that fish species are experiencing two climate-related changes at a time in their habitat: an increase in water temperature, and a lack of water clarity. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: First-Ever December Flood Warning Issued for Red River of the North

PUBLISHED: 04 January 2024      Last Edited: 04 January 2024

Newsweek

The US National Weather Service has issued the rare flood warning following high amounts of ice and rain in North Dakota throughout the month of December. This is the first time a flood warning has ever been issued for the river at this time of year, according to one of the agency’s meteorologists. Click here to continue reading

Is 2024 the year Okanagan Lake floating bridge becomes a suspension bridge?

PUBLISHED: 04 January 2024      Last Edited: 04 January 2024

iNFOnews

This is shaping up to be the driest year on record in terms and if this continues, by the end of winter, could set a modern-day low water level record for Okanagan Lake. That very unlikely event would force a lot of considerations, not least of which is to the only floating bridge in Canada. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: The race to destroy the toxic ‘forever chemicals’ polluting our world

PUBLISHED: 04 January 2024      Last Edited: 04 January 2024

The Guardian

“Forever chemicals” are in our drinking water sources, sea foam and spray, rain and groundwater, sea ice, and even human blood – so now efforts are increasing to detect, remove and destroy them. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: California snowpack lowest in decade despite hope with December storms

PUBLISHED: 04 January 2024      Last Edited: 04 January 2024

The Guardian

In the first snow survey of the season, California came up short – just 25% of the historical average – despite a spate of strong storms that caused flooding and landslides along the coast in late December. Click here to continue reading

Edmonton crews see big jump in water and ice rescues this holiday season

PUBLISHED: 03 January 2024      Last Edited: 03 January 2024

Global News
Over the holidays, Edmonton Fire Rescue Services were called to more than a dozen water or ice rescues. Between Dec. 24 and Jan. 1, there were 13 calls related to water rescues or people on the ice. Click here to continue reading

Water conservation top priority for 2024, says Lethbridge Mayor

PUBLISHED: 03 January 2024      Last Edited: 03 January 2024

CBC

Mandatory water restrictions are on the table, according to Mayor Blaine Hyggen. The mayor sat down with the CBC’s Lethbridge Bureau reporter Ose Irete for a year-end interview to discuss some of council’s priorities this new year. Click here to continue reading

More than 70% of Canada is ‘abnormally dry.’ Here’s why

PUBLISHED: 03 January 2024      Last Edited: 03 January 2024

CTV News

Rising temperatures and intense drought conditions impacted Canadians in 2023, from water rationing to the country’s worst wildfire season on record. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s latest assessment of drought conditions across the country continues to paint a dire picture(opens in a new tab): Canada is “abnormally dry.”. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Fleeing drought, vulnerable populations face flood risk in most African countries

PUBLISHED: 03 January 2024      Last Edited: 03 January 2024

EurekAlert!

In 80% of African countries, people moved toward rivers and into cities during or following drought, increasing the number of people living in flood-risk areas in recent decades. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Scientists discover new way to identify liquid water on exoplanets

PUBLISHED: 03 January 2024      Last Edited: 03 January 2024

EurekAlert!

Scientists have devised a new way to identify habitable planets and potentially inhabited planets, by comparing the amount of carbon dioxide in their atmosphere, to neighbouring planets. Click here to continue reading

Let the lawns go brown: Water conservation key for future Metro Vancouver droughts

PUBLISHED: 02 January 2024      Last Edited: 02 January 2024

Vancouver Sun

A significant amount of the water in Metro Vancouver’s complex reservoir system is consumed not by people, but by lawns, says Linda Parkinson, water services director for Metro Vancouver. Click here to continue reading

‘Life-changing’: Oneida laying groundwork for new water supply pipe

PUBLISHED: 02 January 2024      Last Edited: 02 January 2024

CBC

An Indigenous community near London, Ont., is close to approving the design of a pipeline that will bring fresh drinking water to residents who’ve been on a boil-water advisory for the past four years. Click here to continue reading

Nanton looks to larger neighbour to secure future water supply

PUBLISHED: 02 January 2024      Last Edited: 02 January 2024

CBC

The Town of Nanton is working with the Town High River on a plan to build a treated water pipeline between the two southern Alberta communities. Nanton, about 65 kilometres south of Calgary, needs to secure its future potable water supply. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Growing proportion of England’s flood defences in disrepair, analysis finds

PUBLISHED: 02 January 2024      Last Edited: 02 January 2024

The Guardian

Ministers have been told they will be “punished” by voters after analysis revealed the decline of vital flood defences across England. The proportion of critical assets in disrepair has almost trebled in the West Midlands and the east of England since 2018, leaving thousands of homes and businesses more vulnerable to storms. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Why Are Alaska’s Rivers Turning Orange?

PUBLISHED: 02 January 2024      Last Edited: 02 January 2024

Scientific American

Streams in Alaska are turning orange with iron and sulfuric acid. Scientists are trying to figure out why. Click here to continue reading

Compare and contrast: Thousands of trees planted in Devon to improve water quality

PUBLISHED: 02 January 2024      Last Edited: 02 January 2024

BBC News

More than 40,000 saplings are being planted on land near eight river catchments in Devon. It is part of a long-running project, called Upstream Thinking, to improve water quality. Click here to continue reading