Water News

Alberta Water News is a free, subscription based service that provides the latest information on water news across Alberta and upcoming events.

The news is distributed twice weekly (Tuesday and Thursday) via a collated email and Monday to Friday via WaterPortal social media (Twitter, Facebook, Google+). Subscribe here for the free service, or follow the WaterPortal on your preferred social media platform.

The Western Producer

In Manitoba, 24 mosquitoes with West Nile virus, known as the Culex tarsalis mosquito, were collected from various parts of the province between Aug. 8-14. It brings the total to 86 found this year. Mosquitoes with WNV were found in Saskatchewan the same week, located in moist mixed-grass and prairie aspen parkland, known as zone three of the province. With the recent rain, the region is considered a moderate risk. Click here to continue reading

CTV News

A flood that covered Fort McMurray and northeastern Alberta roughly 12,000 years ago could offer researchers insights into what drives rapid climate change. The epic flooding is one of the largest of its kind in the planet's history. Sophie Norris, who led the team as a U of A Faculty of Science PhD student, says the flood from melting glaciers could have altered the circulation of the world's oceans, causing temperatures to drop and ushering in an ice age. Click here to continue reading

Edmonton Journal

A summer of heat waves and little rainfall has Alberta farmers struggling to make it through the season. Crops aren’t making enough feed for some cattle farms and Shelby Blosky, owner of Double S Ranch Cattle Co., said farmers like herself are having to buy extra hay bales at steeper prices due to limited supply. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

In the stormy waters of the North Sea, 15 miles off the coast of Aberdeenshire, in Scotland, five floating offshore wind turbines stretch 574 feet (175 metres) above the water. The world’s first floating windfarm, a 30 megawatt facility run by the Norwegian company Equinor, has only been in operation since 2017 but has already broken UK records for energy output. Click here to continue reading

CTV News

Residents in a small community in southern Alberta are being advised to take precautions with their drinking water until further notice. Alberta Health Services (AHS) issued a boil water advisory for the village of Foremost as a precautionary measure. Click here to continue reading

The Western Producer

Two Canadian senators learned the importance of southern Alberta’s irrigation system Aug. 12 when they toured a portion of it in the company of various municipal officials. Doug Black from Alberta and Rob Black from Ontario flew in that day over fields greened by irrigation and fields browned by ongoing drought conditions where irrigation is not available. Click here to continue reading

The Western Producer

Early in the growing season, the durum crops looked very good with even germination and good growth. Moisture was adequate to give it a strong start. Then came the searing heat of the July long weekend. With moisture marginal by that juncture, the crop burned up. It would never recover. Click here to continue reading

The Western Producer

There hasn’t been a prairie-wide, deep drought like this for years. There hasn’t been a massive disaster like this for years. Safety net programs have changed. That means we don’t really know how well today’s suite of safety net programs will work for farmers in the current crisis. Click here to continue reading

The Western Producer

Many Alberta beekeepers slammed by drought, heat and wildfire smoke this summer are expecting significant declines in production, affecting the largest segment of Canada’s honey industry. Due to what are now three consecutive seasons of lower-than-average production in Alberta and much of Western Canada, there is no honey in reserve and supplies are tight. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

While Paris’s Seine has inspired some of the greatest works of art and literature, the Senne running through Brussels has been buried under concrete for the last 150 years, condemned by locals as little more than a sewer. As a constant flood risk and source of cholera, it was vaulted in over a century ago, but Belgium’s capital is staging an inauguration that officials hope will force a rethink among Bruxellois about their prejudices against the waterway. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

Kelp can clean New York’s polluted waters, tackle climate change and is sustainable. In addition to bolstering the state’s floundering maritime industries, the brown, fibrous sea vegetable is effective at absorbing carbon, in addition to fighting ocean acidification. But there’s just one catch: it is illegal to farm seaweed in New York state, despite activists’ best efforts. Click here to continue reading