Water News

Alberta Water News is a free, subscription based service that provides the latest information on water news across Alberta and upcoming events.

The news is distributed twice weekly (Tuesday and Thursday) via a collated email and Monday to Friday via WaterPortal social media (Twitter, Facebook, Google+). Subscribe here for the free service, or follow the WaterPortal on your preferred social media platform.

Global News

The topic of water management was highlighted on Thursday, as the Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs held a live forum on featuring researcher Dr. Dena McMartin. Topics discussed Thursday included historical water management, interprovincial water sharing, importance to First Nations communities, and work being done to retain water supply. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

Nanoplastic pollution has been detected in polar regions for the first time, indicating that the tiny particles are now pervasive around the world. The nanoparticles are smaller and more toxic than microplastics, which have already been found across the globe, but the impact of both on people’s health is unknown. Analysis of a core from Greenland’s ice cap showed that nanoplastic contamination has been polluting the remote region for at least 50 years. Click here to continue reading

Canada's National Observer 

A study that links low summertime water flows in a British Columbia river with lower productivity across 22 generations of a struggling salmon population could help guide how rivers are managed to support fish, the authors say. The study published Friday in the journal Ecological Solutions and Evidence used data from 1992 to 2013 to examine changes in the productivity of early summer chinook in the Nicola River, a tributary of the Thompson River in B.C.'s southern Interior. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian 

The heavy rains that soaked California late last year were welcomed by farmers, urban planners – and endangered coho salmon. California received more precipitation from October to December than in the previous 12 months, according to the National Weather Service. The abundance of rain and snow arrived in time for the November-to-January spawning season in the resource-rich Tomales Bay watershed north of San Francisco, enabling some fish to reach tributaries to the Lagunitas Creek, at least 13 miles inland in Marin County. Click here to continue reading

Canada's National Observer

The City of Iqaluit shut down its water treatment plant Wednesday after the water was contaminated last week with fuel for the second time. The city said a breach in the system is suspected to have caused residents to smell fuel in their water, with breaches detected last week and Wednesday. The city said it is using a bypass system to pump water to residents instead and the entire territorial capital is now under a precautionary boil water advisory. Click here to continue reading

Global News

The deadline has been extended for livestock producers wanting to apply to the Farm and Ranch Water Infrastructure Program. In a release, the provincial government acknowledged that producers have experienced difficulties in sourcing materials and contractors to build water development projects following 2021’s drought conditions. The program is now adjusted to allow producers who plan to claim more than $50,000 in rebates to submit a preliminary application by Mar. 31, 2022 in order to complete their projects. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

Armadas of alien-like sea creatures have been washing up on Australian beaches thanks to the warm weather but experts warn people should look but not touch. Bluebottles excrete a microscopic mucus on their tentacles that is invisible and cannot be felt when touched but which contains thousands of stinging cells that are “armed and dangerous” as they inject venom into the skin on contact. Click here to continue reading

Government of Canada 

Protecting the health of our marine environment also ensures that Canada’s oceans economy can continue to grow in a sustainable, environmentally responsible way. Through Innovative Solutions Canada challenges from Transport Canada, the Government is funding three research projects to develop new technologies to reduce underwater vessel noise. Click here to continue reading

Global News

It’s a picturesque little community nestled between the hoodoos and the Red Deer River. For nearly a decade, Penny Head has lived on a riverside property in the community of Lehigh. But it’s in a floodway, and Drumheller town officials say she and 18 other property owners have to vacate. The Town of Drumheller received $55 million from the federal and provincial governments to address flood mitigation. Some money has been allotted for berms and dykes in parts of the town and buyouts for homes in other neighbourhoods. Click here to continue reading

Aspen Journalism

A plan by the lower-basin states to leave more water in Lake Mead embodies a principle explored in a recently published article: Dropping reservoir levels have opened a window of opportunity for water-management policies that move the river system toward sustainability. In December, water managers from California, Nevada and Arizona signed a memorandum of understanding to spend up to $200 million to add 500,000 acre-feet of water to Lake Mead, which has dropped precipitously low due to climate change and drought. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

The all-female freshwater crustacean has become a focus of fascination for scientists in recent years, due to its unique ability among decapods – the family that includes shrimps, crabs and lobsters – to clone itself and quickly adapt to new environments, as well as the fact that it has spread exponentially. The marbled crayfish was first recognised in 1995, when a biology student bought a bag of crayfish – sold to him as “Texas crayfish” – from American traders at a pet fair in Frankfurt. Click here to continue reading

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