Water News 2021

The Guardian

An analysis of coastal rubbish collected over a decade reveals almost half of it is local litter, but in some areas plastic is washing up from overseas. Plastic makes up 84% of the rubbish found on Australian beaches, according to analysis of a decade of clean-up efforts by more than 150,000 citizen scientists. Click here to continue reading

The Chestermere Anchor

Qualico Communities Calgary is excited to announce the Stormwater Kidney® in Dawson’s Landing, Chestermere is now open. The Stormwater Kidney® system cleans stormwater by circulating the water through spaces with a diverse ecosystem of plants and aquatic creatures so that nutrients contained in the stormwater nourish the living organisms. Click here to continue reading

CTV News

Calgarians have voted to add fluoride back to the city's water supply. Calgary stopped adding fluoride to its drinking water in 2011 as directed by city council. Plebiscites on the fluoridation of Calgary's drinking water have been held six times: in 1999, 1989, 1971, 1966, 1961 and 1957. Click here to continue reading

CTV News

The City of Iqaluit says testing shows a high concentration of fuel in a tank that supplies water to the Nunavut capital, but long-term health effects are not a concern. Officials at a news conference Friday said the fuel could be diesel or kerosene. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

Tropical wetlands provide storm protection that saves thousands of lives and more than $600bn each year, an Australian-linked world-first study has found. Dr. Diane Jarvis from james Cook University says it’s vitally important, because around the world the area covered by wetlands is reducing. As we keep destroying our wetlands, we put more people at risk. Click here to continue reading

Canada's National Observer

Japan's new prime minister on Sunday, October 17, 2021, said the planned mass disposal of wastewater stored at the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant cannot be delayed, despite concerns from local residents. Click here to continue reading

Red Deer Advocate

When staff at Iqaluit’s Qajuqturvik Community Food Centre heard the news last week that water from the city’s distribution pipes wasn’t safe to drink because of fuel contamination, they knew some people weren’t going to be able to get the precious liquid themselves. The city set up two distribution sites where people could fill up jugs with potable water. Click here to continue reading

The Western Producer

The 2021 growing season has ended amid drought that plagued much of the Prairies and experts warn the effects aren’t over yet. The Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission recently released a document detailing post-drought agronomic considerations. They include soil fertility, herbicide carryover and insects. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

Residents of Benton Harbor, Michigan, a predominantly Black city that has dealt with elevated lead levels in its water for at least three years, have welcomed an announcement by the governor, that all lead lines in the city would now be replaced over the next 18 months. Click here to continue reading

Canada's National Observer

The Nunavut government has declared a 14-day state of emergency in Iqaluit after water in the capital was deemed undrinkable and potentially tainted with petroleum. The first shipment of potable water for residents also arrived by plane, with more expected to be delivered in the coming days. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

A water company boss has told MPs he would swim in the rivers and sea in the area where he lives, as he and others were challenged over “routine” dumping of raw sewage. The heads of the five largest privatised companies – Southern Water, South West Water, Northumbrian, Severn Trent and Thames Water – were questioned on Wednesday over discharges of raw effluent into rivers. Click here to continue reading