Water News 2019

Global News

Water levels in Lethbridge are below average, even after a rainy May long weekend. Despite more precipitation being forecasted for this week, residents don’t need to worry about flooding, said Doug Kaupp, Lethbridge’s manager of water and wastewater and chair of the Oldman Watershed Council, on Tuesday. Click here to continue reading

Global News

While rebuilding efforts are underway in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, new flood zone maps proposed by the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal (CMM) are making people nervous. Before the dike broke, only two homes were considered to be in a flood zone, but now the maps are putting hundreds of residents in a flood plain. Click here to continue reading

CBC News

Wildfire season is getting longer in Alberta every year with climate change, scorching land and polluting the air with thick smoke. But, the City of Calgary is studying another, perhaps less obvious, impact of wildfires — drinking water contamination. Click here to continue reading

Chestermere Anchor City News

Sailors are traveling from across the province to Chestermere Lake for the second CYC Spring Training Weekend. From May 25 until May 26, roughly 50 sailors from seven-year-olds to 70-year-olds are expected to get back into the boats and spend a weekend on the water. Click here to continue reading

Global News

“We have less water available per person in the Okanagan than anywhere in Canada,” Corinne Jackson of the Okanagan Basin Water Board said. It’s a startling statistic from the launch of the annual ‘Make Water Work’ campaign at Glenmore Elementary school on Thursday morning. The initiative, now its ninth year, provides tips and tools to become water wise. Click here to continue reading

Western Producer 

Most farmers are familiar with the 4Rs of nutrient stewardship — the right source, at the right rate, applied at the right time in the right place. When it comes to phosphorus, farmers and researchers agree the right place is buried in the soil, not running off down a ditch, because if phosphorus is running down a ditch, it will end up in streams, rivers and lakes. Click here to continue reading

CBC News

The governor of Washington has declared a drought emergency for nearly half of the state. A hot spring has led to a snowpack of less than 50 per cent of normal for this time of year, Gov. Jay Inslee said in a statement. With less snowpack, the statement continued, water availability is expected to be less reliable. Click here to continue reading