Water News 2022

Planning for east-central irrigation expansion

PUBLISHED: 06 December 2022

Government of Alberta

Alberta’s government and its partners are investing in an irrigation expansion project that will position Alberta’s agriculture sector to lead economic growth. Click here to continue reading

Researchers propose new structures to harvest untapped source of freshwater

PUBLISHED: 06 December 2022

Science Daily

An almost limitless supply of fresh water exists in the form of water vapor above Earth’s oceans, yet remains untapped, researchers said. A new study suggests an investment in new infrastructure capable of harvesting oceanic water vapor as a solution to limited supplies of fresh water in various locations around the world. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: U.S. winter wheat crop in trouble

PUBLISHED: 05 December 2022

The Western Producer

The U.S. winter wheat crop is in terrible shape as 2022 draws to a close, but that is not necessarily a precursor of what’s to come in 2023, says an analyst. An estimated 34 percent of the crop was rated good-to-excellent as of Nov. 29, down from 44 percent the same time one year ago. Click here to continue reading

Avalanche Canada introduces new forecasting model, says it’s easier to use

PUBLISHED: 05 December 2022

Global News

Heading into the backcountry? Avalanche Canada says it has a new forecasting system that outdoor enthusiasts will find easier to use. The new model will group areas that have similar avalanche conditions, along with giving users relevant information. Click here to continue reading

Jabal: the new wheat scientists say can withstand extreme heat and drought

PUBLISHED: 05 December 2022

The Guardian

A new drought-tolerant variety of durum wheat has been created as part of an international breeding programme to boost climate resilience in the food system by increasing crop diversity. Click here to continue reading

‘Harmful or beneficial?’ Researchers weigh the aquatic impact of melting glaciers

PUBLISHED: 05 December 2022

CTV News

New research has found that climate change could cause more than 100,000 tonnes of micro-organisms to be released into natural ecosystems every year, a result of melting glaciers in the Northern Hemisphere. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: 2,500 Caspian seals found dead along Russian coastline

PUBLISHED: 05 December 2022

The Guardian

About 2,500 seals have been found dead on the Caspian Sea coast in southern Russia, officials said on Sunday. Regional officials initially reported on Saturday that 700 dead seals had been found on the coast, but the Russian Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment later raised the figure to about 2,500. Click here to continue reading

Water Canada Webinar: A closer look at PFAS

PUBLISHED: 05 December 2022

Water Canada

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, are a huge group of manmade chemicals that have been used in industry and in consumer products since the 1940s. Thanks to their incredibly strong carbon-fluorine bond, PFAS degrade quite slowly and resist heat, grease, and water making them seemingly perfect for cookware and popcorn bags, firefighting foam and textiles, and everything in between. Sounds too good to be true? Click here to continue reading

New disaster mitigation infrastructure for Saint John

PUBLISHED: 05 December 2022

Water Canada

Wayne Long, Member of Parliament for Saint John—Rothesay, and John MacKenzie, Deputy Mayor of the City of Saint John, has announced more than $30 million in joint funding for climate-resilient infrastructure projects in Saint John. This investment will increase the flood resiliency of critical wastewater infrastructure across the city. Click here to continue reading

Pilot project adds layer of protection from aquatic invasive species in Manitoba

PUBLISHED: 05 December 2022

Water Canada

Aquatic invasive species pose a serious threat to our environment, to species at risk across Canada, and to industries that rely on aquatic resources such as fisheries and aquaculture. Click here to continue reading

The Water Security Agency Releases Winter Conditions Forecast

PUBLISHED: 02 December 2022

Government of Saskatchewan

The Water Security Agency’s (WSA) 2022 Conditions at Freeze-up Report indicates that most areas of the province are on the dry side going into the winter. While some areas of the province experienced higher than normal spring and early summer precipitation, the last half of the summer and early fall were dry resulting in drier than normal soil moisture conditions at freeze-up. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Drought-hit California cities to get little water from state

PUBLISHED: 02 December 2022

CTV News

California water agencies that serve 27 million people will get just 5% of what they requested from the state to kick off 2023, water officials announced Thursday. Click here to continue reading

Hamilton sewage spill estimated to be 337 million litres over 26 years

PUBLISHED: 02 December 2022

Water Canada

Following the discovery and immediate repair of a hole in a combined sewer pipe spilling into a storm sewer pipe that flowed into the Hamilton Harbour, the City estimates that as much as 337 million litres of sanitary sewage discharged into the Hamilton Harbour over a duration of 26 years. Click here to continue reading

5 Billion People Will Face Water Shortages by 2050, U.N. Says

PUBLISHED: 02 December 2022

Scientific American

Five billion people, or around two-thirds of the world’s population, will face at least one month of water shortages by 2050, according to the first in a series of United Nations reports on how climate change is affecting the world’s water resources. Click here to continue reading

Designing better water filters with AI

PUBLISHED: 01 December 2022

Science Daily

Even the best water filters let some things through, but designing improved materials and then testing them is time consuming and difficult. Now, researchers report that artificial intelligence (AI) could speed up the development of promising materials. Click here to continue reading

Budgets, bridges and tires — why Metro Vancouver seems to struggle with 15 cm of snow

PUBLISHED: 01 December 2022

CBC News

But why does southwest B.C. seemingly struggle with what much of the country manages with more ease? Here are a few of the primary factors. Click here to continue reading

Thousands of N.S. homes, businesses without power after widespread rain, wind

PUBLISHED: 01 December 2022

CBC News

Thousands of homes and businesses were without power in Nova Scotia on Thursday after widespread rain and wind overnight. As of 2 p.m. AT, about 24,000 Nova Scotia Power customers were without electricity, according to the utility’s outage map. Click here to continue reading

Finding genes to help fruiting plants adapt to droughts

PUBLISHED: 01 December 2022

Science Daily

As climate change is expected to lead to more frequent periods of drought, researchers are increasingly working to make discoveries that can help plants adapt to prolonged water stress. Click here to continue reading

Ontario not effectively managing urban flood risks, Auditor-General says

PUBLISHED: 01 December 2022

The Globe and Mail

Ontario has never clarified the responsibilities of various provincial departments involved, the report said. And it doesn’t provide homeowners and municipalities with adequate guidance. Click here to continue reading

Strongest Arctic cyclone on record led to surprising loss of sea ice

PUBLISHED: 30 November 2022

Science Daily

The strongest Arctic cyclone ever observed struck in January 2022. A new analysis shows that while forecasts accurately predicted the massive storm, models seriously underestimated its effect on sea ice. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: US to spend $250m on cleanup at California’s toxic Salton Sea

PUBLISHED: 30 November 2022

The Guardian

The US government said on Monday it will spend up to $250m over four years to help mitigate an environmental health disaster that has been brewing in California’s Salton Sea for nearly two decades. Click here to continue reading

Thousands without power on B.C.’s South Coast as snow batters the region

PUBLISHED: 30 November 2022

CBC News

More than 30,000 people on B.C.’s South Coast were without power while a bridge connecting parts of Metro Vancouver was closed Tuesday night as snow continued to hit the region. Click here to continue reading

Rolling on the river: With lake closure looming, triathlon officials look to the North Saskatchewan

PUBLISHED: 30 November 2022

CBC News

Thousands of professional and amateur swimmers could race down the North Saskatchewan River this summer if a non-profit organization’s plan for major triathlon events goes ahead. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: US justice department sues city of Jackson over water crisis

PUBLISHED: 30 November 2022

The Guardian

The US justice department has taken drastic action regarding the crisis in Jackson, Mississippi, that has affected drinking water for its 150,000 residents for several months. Click here to continue reading

Ducks Unlimited Canada contributes to innovative climate research

PUBLISHED: 30 November 2022

Water Canada

Ducks Unlimited Canada is contributing to innovative climate research focused on bringing Canada closer to achieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The Government of Canada has announced funding for three novel projects as part of the Climate Action and Awareness Fund. Click here to continue reading

How much water do you need to drink in a day? ‘Eight glasses a day’ rule a myth: study

PUBLISHED: 30 November 2022

CTV News

You may have heard the oft-repeated advice to drink eight glasses of water a day – but according to a new study, there’s no easy way to pinpoint how much water you need to drink regularly. Click here to continue reading

Foothills County says it didn’t get fair share of water pipeline money

PUBLISHED: 29 November 2022

Okotoks Today

An announcement this summer which was touted as the solution to Okotoks and Foothills County’s water woes is now being presented in a different light. In July, then Minister of Transportation Prasad Panda paid a visit to Okotoks to announce the awarding of a $15.9-million Water for Life Grant to the two municipalities for completion of a regional water pipeline. Click here to continue reading

City of Lethbridge trying to be proactive with watermain breaks

PUBLISHED: 29 November 2022

Lethbridge News Now

Winter is unofficially underway in Southern Alberta, and with that, comes a greater risk of watermain breaks. City of Lethbridge Water and Wastewater Operations Manager Jeff Koshuta says there is little that residents can do to prevent watermain breaks themselves, which is why it is important for the city to be proactive. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Water boil order issued for more than 2 million in Houston

PUBLISHED: 28 November 2022

Toronto Star

More than 2 million people in the Houston area were under a boil order notice Monday after a power outage at a purification plant caused water pressure to drop, and the mayor of the nation’s fourth-largest city ordered a full review of the system. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Great Barrier Reef should be placed on world heritage ‘in danger’ list, UN-backed report says

PUBLISHED: 28 November 2022

The Guardian

A UN-backed mission to the Great Barrier Reef has concluded the world’s biggest coral reef system should be placed on a list of world heritage sites in danger. The long-awaited report on the 10-day mission that took place in March said climate change was presenting a “serious challenge” to the values that saw the reef inscribed as a global wonder in 1981. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba Government Launches New Water Management Strategy

PUBLISHED: 25 November 2022

Government of Manitoba

As Manitoba’s first whole-of-government water strategy since 2003, the new water management strategy provides a comprehensive framework to conserve and protect the environment, enhance resiliency, improve water quality and availability and foster economic development opportunities, the premier noted. The water management strategy will help support innovative solutions, best practices and new technologies to help address the shared water needs of Manitobans. Click here to continue reading

Federal government to spend $1.6B on communities adapting to forest fires, floods and storms

PUBLISHED: 25 November 2022

CTV News

A national climate adaptation strategy released Thursday includes $1.6 billion in new spending to help communities faced with risks ranging from deadly heat waves and wildfires to floods and storms. Click here to continue reading

Aging reservoir under Red Deer’s water tower is getting $3.5 million in repairs

PUBLISHED: 25 November 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Repairs of a vast, underground reservoir that lies at the roots of Red Deer’s ‘Green Onion’ water tower are now underway and are expected to take until spring. Click here to continue reading

Flooded Red Deer homeowners still waiting for provincial relief

PUBLISHED: 25 November 2022

Red Deer Advocate

More than 220 Red Deer homeowners are still waiting to hear whether the provincial government will help pay for uninsured property damage caused by flooding in June. As the year winds down, the City of Red Deer is also still waiting for the government’s response. Click here to continue reading

Water sector employees: Do you know your local safety legislation?

PUBLISHED: 25 November 2022

Water Canada

Covering nearly 10 million square kilometres, Canada is vast, providing a wide range of environments, terrains, and hazards with which water sector employees must contend with. Due to the dynamic safety landscape, Canada has both federal and provincial legislation to ensure workers are protected. Click here to continue reading

‘It’s a real challenge’: What gaps in Arctic surveillance could mean for Canada

PUBLISHED: 25 November 2022

CTV News

In a report released on Nov. 15, auditor general Karen Hogan highlighted the gaps in Canada’s surveillance of its Arctic waters, many of which could expose Canada to security threats, illegal fishing, and unauthorized entry of ships and vessels. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Thames Water lifts hosepipe ban after above-average rainfall

PUBLISHED: 23 November 2022

The Guardian

A hosepipe ban imposed on 15 million people in England is being lifted after three months, it has been announced. Thames Water said the scrapping of the measure was possible due to recent above-average rainfall and the public’s compliance. Click here to continue reading

Lead in drinking water at some Quebec schools still exceeds Health Canada guideline

PUBLISHED: 23 November 2022

CTV News

About a year after the Quebec government released a report on the levels of lead in the drinking water in schools, some school boards have yet to make all the necessary repairs. Among the reasons cited for the delays are government financing issues, labour shortages at plumbing and water testing companies, difficulty procuring parts and the pandemic. Click here to continue reading

Toronto researcher wins Mitacs Award for groundbreaking work to protect land, groundwater from toxic substances

PUBLISHED: 22 November 2022

Water Canada

For the past several years, University of Toronto researcher Courtney Toth has been keeping a close eye on fermenters. But instead of brewing beverages like beer or wine, she’s growing a cocktail of microbes that ‘eat’ some of the world’s most widespread contaminants. Click here to continue reading

Why water is the new carbon

PUBLISHED: 22 November 2022

Water Canada

There’s a steady stream of news about severe water shortages and “megadrought” around the globe. As the Colorado River dries up in the United States, it’s clear that everyone – from families, to small businesses, to multinational corporations – should be asking the same question: What are we going to do about it TODAY? Tomorrow will be too late for all of us to become water stewards. Even water-rich Canada must deal with climate-change impacts on water security and quality, especially for its indigenous communities. Click here to continue reading

Canada’s 1929 killer tsunami: 93 years ago today in Newfoundland

PUBLISHED: 22 November 2022

Calgary Herald

On this date, Nov. 18, in history in 1929, an earthquake in Cape Breton sent a 15-metre tidal wave onto Newfoundland’s Burin Peninsula. The tsunami of water killed at least 27 people and did $2 million in damage. Giant waves hit the coast at a speed of 40 km/hr and entire houses were washed out to sea. Hundreds lost their homes. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Low Mississippi River water levels threatens grain exports

PUBLISHED: 22 November 2022

The Western Producer

Low water levels on the Mississippi River in the United States could have an impact on corn and other grain prices, but are unlikely to affect fertilizer deliveries into Canada, say officials. The Mississippi River is considered low if the stage falls below five feet in Memphis, Tennessee. On Oct. 20 it hit a record low of -10.74 feet. The stage bounced back to -0.79 feet on Nov. 18, due to rains in Kentucky and Tennessee that made their way into the river basin. Click here to continue reading

Turning wastewater into fertilizer is feasible and could help to make agriculture more sustainable

PUBLISHED: 22 November 2022

Science Daily

The wastewater draining from massive pools of sewage sludge has the potential to play a role in more sustainable agriculture, according to environmental engineering researchers. Click here to continue reading

More than 110 experts raise alarm over WHO’s ‘weak’ PFAS limits for drinking water

PUBLISHED: 22 November 2022

The Guardian

More than 110 scientists and regulators worldwide are raising a public alarm over what they label “weak” PFAS drinking water limits proposed by the World Health Organization, which they charge used shoddy science and “arbitrarily” dismissed hundreds of studies linking the “forever chemicals” to serious health problems. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Buffalo, N.Y., braces for another wallop of lake-effect snow as storms continue

PUBLISHED: 22 November 2022

CBC News

A massive storm has dumped several feet of snow in the areas ringing Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, causing at least three deaths, forcing an NFL game to be moved and creating gridlock as tractor-trailers detoured onto smaller roads to avoid a closure of part of Interstate 90 in western New York. The lake-effect storm had produced more than 1.8 metres (six feet) of snow in some areas by Saturday morning. The Buffalo metro area was hit particularly hard, with some areas south of the city bearing the brunt. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘We couldn’t fail them’: how Pakistan’s floods spurred fight at Cop for loss and damage fund

PUBLISHED: 22 November 2022

The Guardian

In early September, after unprecedented rainfall had left a third of Pakistan under water, its climate change minister set out the country’s stall for Cop27. “We are on the frontline and intend to keep loss and damage and adapting to climate catastrophes at the core of our arguments and negotiations. There will be no moving away from that,” Sherry Rehman said. Click here to continue reading

How a common fungus eliminates toxic mercury from soil and water

PUBLISHED: 18 November 2022

Science Daily

Researchers found that the fungus Metarhizium robertsii removes mercury from the soil around plant roots, and from fresh and saltwater. The researchers also genetically engineered the fungus to amplify its mercury detoxifying effects. This new work suggests Metarhizium could provide an inexpensive and efficient way to protect crops grown in polluted areas and remediate mercury-laden waterways. Click here to continue reading

‘Widespread’ amounts of cocaine, painkillers found in fish habitat on Sumas Prairie after 2021 floods: study

PUBLISHED: 18 November 2022

CBC News

Fish habitat in the lower Fraser Valley was found to have an “astounding” amount of contaminants after extreme flooding last fall, according to a new study. The Raincoast Conservation Foundation said excessive nutrients, metals, fecal bacteria, hydrocarbons and pesticides — as well as cocaine and painkillers — were detected in 29 surface water samples from the Sumas Prairie in Abbotsford, B.C., over a seven-week period after the flood. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: US approves largest dam removal in history to save endangered salmon

PUBLISHED: 18 November 2022

The Guardian

A US agency seeking to restore habitat for endangered fish gave final approval on Thursday to decommission four dams straddling the California-Oregon border, the largest dam removal undertaking in US history. Dam removal is expected to improve the health of the Klamath River, the route that Chinook salmon and endangered coho salmon take from the Pacific Ocean to their upstream spawning grounds, and from where the young fish return to the sea. Click here to continue reading

‘Roofs can collapse:’ Understanding the lake-effect snow headed for Ontario this weekend

PUBLISHED: 18 November 2022

CTV News

Communities around southern Ontario are bracing for intense winter weather as a lake-effect squall pattern threatens to deliver large amounts of snow Thursday night and into the weekend. According to the Weather Network and Environment Canada, some areas of the Great Lakes region – such as those on the eastern shores of Lake Ontario, Georgian Bay and Lake Erie – could be buried under 40 to 60 centimetres of snow by Sunday. Click here to continue reading

Fluoride still not flowing in Calgary’s water

PUBLISHED: 17 November 2022

Global News

Last year, council voted in favour of adding fluoride after a plebiscite question in the municipal election. However, if you think you’ve been drinking it over the last 12 months, you’re mistaken. At the time of the vote, city officials told councillors it would take between 18 and 24 months to complete the work to add the mineral back into Calgarians water. But that timeline may now be extended. Click here to continue reading

Canada’s Arctic is on thin ice, making transportation treacherous

PUBLISHED: 17 November 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Across the North, already underdeveloped transportation networks needed for access to resources, medical care and travel face increasing threats due to climate warming happening nearly three times faster than the global average. Many northern communities and mining operations rely on winter roads for annual supplies of fuel, construction materials and other goods too expensive to transport by air. Climate change is reducing the amount of time these roads can remain open. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: US regulators to vote on removing huge dam to save salmon

PUBLISHED: 17 November 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The largest dam demolition and river restoration plan in the world could be close to reality Thursday as U.S. regulators vote on a plan to remove four aging hydro-electric structures, reopening hundreds of miles of California river habitat to imperiled salmon. The vote by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the lower Klamath River dams is the last major regulatory hurdle and the biggest milestone facing a $500 million demolition proposal championed by Native American tribes and environmentalists for years. Click here to continue reading

Lethbridge has the ‘best tasting water’ out of 9 Western Canadian communities

PUBLISHED: 16 November 2022

CTV News

Lethbridge has taken the top prize for water quality, beating Calgary, Edmonton and Jasper for the honour. The award, which was given out at the American Water Works Association’s Western Canadian conference in September, recognizes municipalities for their water treatment and testing protocols. Lethbridge’s water was graded higher than Jasper and St. Paul, Alta., as well as EPCOR’s Edmonton water treatment plant and the City of Calgary. Click here to continue reading

Global heating to drive stronger La Niña and El Niño events by 2030, researchers say

PUBLISHED: 16 November 2022

The Guardian

Stronger La Niña and El Niño events due to global heating will be detectable in the eastern Pacific Ocean by 2030, decades earlier than previously expected, new modelling suggests. Researchers have analysed 70 years of reliable sea surface temperature records in the Pacific Ocean to model changes in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (Enso) under current projections of global heating. Click here to continue reading

Solar plant at wastewater treatment facility part of Jasper council budget deliberations

PUBLISHED: 16 November 2022

CTV News

The dried-out lagoons are just sitting there with the sun shining down on them. It’s a scenario that is rich for one opportunity, and one only. Jasper’s municipal energy manager presented a viability report on establishing a solar plant to town council last week. Council took it into consideration during this week’s presentations for its upcoming budget. The report is the first step toward examining the feasibility of generating solar power at the Wastewater Treatment Plant on Cottonwood Creek Road. Click here to continue reading

New polling shows British Columbians want more action on flood risk

PUBLISHED: 16 November 2022

Water Canada

One year ago, a series of atmospheric rivers brought unprecedented rain to southwest British Columbia (BC). The storms resulted in the tragic loss of life, as well as devastating mudslides, and flooded homes, farms and businesses. A year after these events, Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) commissioned exclusive polling by Pollara Strategic Insights that found 88% of British Columbians surveyed believe further action is needed to protect communities against the risk of flooding. Click here to continue reading

Waterloo wastewater treatment plant innovation wins award

PUBLISHED: 16 November 2022

Water Canada

During the treatment process, wastewater solids coming from your toilet or sinks, for example, enter a tank where microorganisms digest the organic matter. This process produces gases made mostly of methane and carbon dioxide — two harmful greenhouse gases. These three wastewater treatment plants produce a combined total of 13,000 to 22,200 cubic metres of gas daily — roughly the carbon footprint of 2,700 people. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Short on fresh water, North Africa turns to desalination for water security

PUBLISHED: 15 November 2022

CBC News

Low water levels reveal dry, crusty banks of the Nile River. As one of the longest rivers in the world is threatened by both overuse and climate change, so is the water security of the millions of people who rely on it for daily use in Sudan and Egypt. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Fish passes give endangered twaite shad chance to swim up Severn River and spawn

PUBLISHED: 15 November 2022

The Guardian

For nearly two centuries, one of Britain’s rarest fish has been shut out of its spawning grounds by large weirs. But the endangered twaite shad has now returned to its historic spawning habitat on the River Severn, thanks to four new fish passes that enable the migratory fish to negotiate weirs and swim up river to lay eggs. Click here to continue reading

1 year later, British Columbians who lost everything reflect on devastating floods

PUBLISHED: 15 November 2022

CBC News

The relentless rain came via an atmospheric river — an airborne stream of water vapour across the Pacific that originated in the subtropics. It triggered fatal mudslides, damaged critical highway infrastructure and called into question responsibility for flood mitigation in a province repeatedly pummeled by the impacts of climate change. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Thirsty wheat needed new water management strategy in ancient China

PUBLISHED: 14 November 2022

Science Daily

Research shows that a practice of purposeful water management, or irrigation, was adopted in northern China about 4,000 years ago as part of an effort to grow new grains that had been introduced from southwest Asia. But the story gets more complex from there. Wheat and barley arrived on the scene at about the same time, but early farmers only used water management techniques for wheat. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Facing a dire future, Florida’s coral reef gets many helping hands

PUBLISHED: 14 November 2022

Calgary Herald 

From ongoing risks to reefs and the inevitable loss of some smaller islands due to rising sea levels, the Florida Keys are facing some monumental environmental challenges. And while famous for its laidback vibe, the region is anything but laissez-faire when it comes to protecting its wildlife, its landscape and its future. Click here to continue reading

COP 14 honours 25 newly accredited Wetland Cities

PUBLISHED: 14 November 2022

Water Canada

Parties at the Convention on Wetlands’ 14th Conference of the Parties or COP14 celebrated this year’s 25 accredited Wetland Cities at a dedicated ceremony. The 25 new wetland cities were commended for exceptional efforts to safeguard urban wetlands for people and nature. The Wetland City Accreditation Scheme was established by the Convention on Wetlands in 2015, recognizing urban wetlands’ important services for livelihoods, health, climate regulation, flood and storm protection and biodiversity. Click here to continue reading

Water scarcity on agenda as Cop27 climate talks enter second week

PUBLISHED: 14 November 2022

The Guardian

Water and the effects of the climate crisis on water scarcity will come under scrutiny on Monday at the Cop27 UN climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh as it enters its second week. The talks are scheduled to end on Friday, though it is likely they will continue at least into Saturday, with new measures and pledges hoped for on issues from greenhouse gas emissions cuts to financial assistance for the poorest nations. Click here to continue reading

Future-proofing groundwater sustainability

PUBLISHED: 14 November 2022

Water Canada

Groundwater is the world’s largest freshwater resource. But because it’s deep underground, signs of overuse aren’t always obvious. And with population growth and increased demands for water on the rise, groundwater resources are becoming vulnerable. Click here to continue reading

Town approves $600k for new hydrovac

PUBLISHED: 14 November 2022

East Central Alberta Review

Stettler town council approved just over $600,000 to buy a new hydrovac that uses high-pressure water to break up earth which is then vacuumed up for removal. The decision was made at the Nov. 1 regular meeting of council. Click here to continue reading

The International Red River Watershed Board to monitor key nutrients to help reduce the impact of harmful blooms in the Red River basin

PUBLISHED: 14 November 2022

Water Canada

To continue improving water quality in the Red River basin, including downstream in Lake Winnipeg, the governments of Canada and the United States approved four additional water quality objectives to be monitored by the International Red River Watershed Board (IRRWB) following a recommendation by the International Joint Commission (IJC). These additional, non-regulatory water quality objectives are for the key nutrients phosphorus and nitrogen. Click here to continue reading

Much of northwestern Ontario braces for a storm amid several snowfall and freezing rain warnings

PUBLISHED: 11 November 2022

CBC News

The balmy fall weather that’s lasted into November for most of northwestern Ontario is set to end with the first snowstorm of the year expected to roll through today and into tomorrow. Much of the region is under snowfall and freezing rain warning as of Thursday morning, with other sections of the northwest under special weather statements as severe weather is expected to hit Friday. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Waterlogged Aussie wheat crop takes quality hit

PUBLISHED: 11 November 2022

The Western Producer

Flooding and excessive rain across key parts of Australia’s wheat growing areas have resulted in extensive damage to what was expected to be a record bin-busting high-quality crop just a few weeks ago, exacerbating concerns over world food supplies. A lower quality crop in Australia, the world’s No.2 supplier of the grain, comes as dryness in North America and the Russia-Ukraine war curb global supplies, fuelling red-hot food prices. Click here to continue reading

‘It was giving me a hug’: video captures rare giant octopus encounter

PUBLISHED: 09 November 2022

The Guardian

For outsiders, scuba diving in the frigid waters of the northern Pacific can seem daunting: limbs quickly go numb without the right equipment, and unlike the sparkling blue of the tropics, the water has a gloomy, greenish tint. But a recent viral encounter between a diver and an octopus has highlighted the particular magic of the sunken kelp forests off the coast of British Columbia. Click here to continue reading

Équipe Laurence campus using wastewater energy technology for heating and cooling

PUBLISHED: 09 November 2022

Water Canada

It is because of a unique and exclusive environmental partnership that the civil engineering firm Équipe Laurence has just realized a premiere in Quebec, in collaboration with the city of Ste-Adèle. This premiere is largely inspired by a concept derived from geothermal energy: hydrothermal energy. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba Government launches new water management strategy

PUBLISHED: 09 November 2022

Water Canada

The Manitoba government is unveiling a new water management strategy – the first of its kind in nearly 20 years – to guide future actions, decisions and investments to protect the province’s water resources and ecosystems while sustainably growing the economy and communities, Premier Heather Stefanson and Environment, Climate and Parks Minister Jeff Wharton announced. Click here to continue reading

Atlantic First Nations Water Authority makes history as first Indigenous Water Utility

PUBLISHED: 09 November 2022

Water Canada

It’s now official after an agreement was formally signed in Halifax on November 7: the Atlantic First Nations Water Authority (AFNWA) becomes the first Indigenous Water Utility in the country. This is a significant milestone as it puts control of water and wastewater management firmly in the hands of First Nations. The transfer agreement enables First Nations to now officially join the water authority after receiving approval from their community members. Click here to continue reading

Rethinking mountain water security

PUBLISHED: 09 November 2022

Science Daily

Water security in mountain regions relies on a broader understanding of the complex interlinks of water supply and demand that goes far beyond the study of glacier melt. Current information on how the communities which depend on water from mountain snow and ice will be affected by climate change is limited, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Drought tests resilience of Spain’s olive groves and farmers

PUBLISHED: 09 November 2022

Canada’s National Observer

An extremely hot, dry summer that shrank reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of Spain’s staple crops: the olives that make the European country the world’s leading producer and exporter of the tiny green fruits that are pressed into golden oil. Industry experts and authorities predict Spain’s fall olive harvest will be nearly half the size of last year’s, another casualty of global weather shifts caused by climate change. Click here to continue reading

Applications open for IWA-Grundfos ‘Youth Action for SDG 6’ Fellowship

PUBLISHED: 09 November 2022

Water Canada

The International Water Association (IWA) and Grundfos Youth Action for SDG6 Fellowship will mobilise twelve Young Water Professionals (YWPs) from around the globe to actively participate in the UN 2023 Water Conference, in New York, USA. After the conference, the selected YWPs will work together with Grundfos staff and IWA to co-develop a publication that provides insights into the critical role that young people have in the implementation of the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goal Agenda. Click here to continue reading

Climate conference hears loss of Arctic summer sea ice now inevitable by 2050

PUBLISHED: 09 November 2022

CBC News

A new report from dozens of international scientists says it’s inevitable the Arctic will lose its entire summer sea cover at least once over the next generation and probably a lot more often than that. The loss, expected to happen at least once by 2050, spells the end of an entire ecosystem that has evolved for year-round ice cover. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Kenya’s worst drought in decades has killed hundreds of elephants, zebras and other wildlife

PUBLISHED: 08 November 2022

CBC News

Hundreds of animals, including elephants and endangered Grevy’s zebras, have died in Kenyan wildlife preserves during East Africa’s worst drought in decades, according to a report released Friday. The Kenya Wildlife Service and other organizations counted the deaths of 205 elephants, 512 wildebeests, 381 common zebras, 51 buffalos, 49 Grevy’s zebras and 12 giraffes in the past nine months, the report states. Click here to continue reading

Volunteers expect brown trout numbers to keep steady at annual Elbow River count

PUBLISHED: 08 November 2022

CBC News

Wading into cold waters, a group of volunteers took to Calgary’s Elbow River Friday morning to count brown trout spawning grounds. The annual count has taken place for 25 years and is often used as an indicator for the health of the river. A local organization, Calgary River Valleys, organizes the count every year, keeps track of the data and shares it with Alberta Fish and Wildlife. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: NSW floods: three towns cut off by water relying on airdrops for food and medical supplies

PUBLISHED: 08 November 2022

The Guardian

Three New South Wales towns isolated by flood waters have formed a “flood island” triangle requiring airdrops of food and medicine, as more than 100 flood warnings remain in place across a state reeling from a weeks-long emergency. There were 16 emergency warnings in place across NSW on Monday morning, with some towns predicted to see flooding like “they’ve never seen before”, the State Emergency Service said, while a massive clean up has begun in Wagga Wagga and Forbes, where water levels peaked over the weekend. Click here to continue reading

Northern Waters: Water treatment challenges across Canada’s territories

PUBLISHED: 08 November 2022

Water Canada

When spring arrived this past year in the town of Hay River, Northwest Territories, residents weren’t ready for what followed. River water levels reaching historic highs from heavy precipitation, winter snow levels, and spring breakup caused tens of millions of dollars in flood damage. One of the worst hit areas was the town’s water treatment plant, which was severely damaged, with reports estimating $10 million in repairs and an additional $20 million for mitigation. Click here to continue reading

Prince Albert Raw Water Pump House project complete

PUBLISHED: 08 November 2022

Water Canada

An essential water utility infrastructure project is now complete, thanks to federal and municipal investments. The City of Prince Albert officially announced the completion of construction of its new Raw Water Pump House along River Street West. This five-story building extends 15.9 metres below ground and 2.3 metres below river level. Click here to continue reading

Atlantic First Nations Water Authority and Government of Canada to sign historic water and wastewater transfer agreement

PUBLISHED: 08 November 2022

Water Canada

Please be advised that CEO Carl Yates and Board Chair Chief Wilbert Marshall of the Atlantic First Nations Water Authority, alongside the federal Minister of Indigenous Services, Patty Hajdu, will provide remarks and participate in the signing of a service delivery transfer agreement related to water and wastewater services for participating First Nations in the region. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Smells like sewage’: blackwater from Victorian floods causes mass fish deaths

PUBLISHED: 08 November 2022

The Guardian

Peter Phillips has spent a lot of time in blackwater. He paddled 2,000km over 50 days along the Murray River during the 2016 floods. Most of that was in blackwater, an event often caused by flooding when high levels of organic material are washed into the river systems, and which “basically sucks all the oxygen out of the water” as it decays. Click here to continue reading

World faces ‘terminal’ loss of Arctic sea ice during summers, report warns

PUBLISHED: 08 November 2022

The Guardian

The climate crisis has pushed the planet’s stores of ice to a widespread collapse that was “unthinkable just a decade ago”, with Arctic sea ice certain to vanish in summers and ruinous sea level rise from melting glaciers now already in motion, a major new report has warned. Even if planet-heating emissions are radically cut, the world’s vast ice sheets at the poles will continue to melt away for hundreds of years, causing up to three metres of sea level rise that will imperil coastal cities, the report states. Click here to continue reading

Snowfall warning issued for Calgary, most of southeastern Alberta

PUBLISHED: 07 November 2022

Calgary Herald

Another snowfall warning has been issued for the city of Calgary by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) as a winter storm continues to pelt the region, which could see up to 25 cm of snow by Thursday evening. Road conditions have been deteriorating since the snowfall started Wednesday, with ECCC predicting the Highway 1 corridor and south of the city most likely to get the highest snowfall before the snow is forecasted to ease in the evening. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: A nervous wait’: parts of regional NSW brace for worst flooding in 70 years

PUBLISHED: 04 November 2022

The Guardian

Central west NSW is facing its worst flooding in 70 years, with 22 emergency warnings issued across the state on Friday, including for Wagga Wagga, Gunnedah and Moama. More than 1000 residents in Forbes have been told to leave for higher ground, with the overflowing Lachlan River expected to exceed 10.8 metres by Friday night – a mark not reached since 1952. Click here to continue reading

A deeper dive into the marine protected network plan on Canada’s West Coast

PUBLISHED: 04 November 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Following more than a decade of work, 17 coastal First Nations and the Canadian and B.C. governments have created a network draft plan to protect and link biodiversity hot spots and areas of cultural importance inside the 100,000-square-kilometre stretch of ocean. The network is expected to cover 30 per cent of the Northern Shelf region and will build on already existing protected areas that comprise half of the proposed network area. Click here to continue reading

How can landfill operators prepare to deal with PFAS in their leachates?

PUBLISHED: 04 November 2022

Water Canada

Few emerging issues are as contentious for the waste industry as contamination by per-/poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). These substances, now better known as forever chemicals, are found in everything from single-use items, food packaging, carpets, rain-retardant and oil-resistant clothing, stain-resistant upholstery, personal care products including dental floss, copy paper, kitchenware, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) biosolids–all of which end up in landfills and contribute to the presence of PFAS in landfill leachate. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Indigenous people in Peruvian Amazon detain tourists in oil spill protest

PUBLISHED: 04 November 2022

The Guardian

Indigenous people in the Amazon in Peru have detained a group of Peruvian and foreign tourists, including UK and US citizens, in protest at a lack of government aid following an oil spill in the area. French, Spanish and Swiss citizens are also among the detained tourists, who were held while travelling on a river boat. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Weather tracker: hurricane activity in Atlantic dips below predicted level

PUBLISHED: 04 November 2022

The Guardian

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted 14 to 21 named storms for the 2022 season, with six to 10 becoming hurricanes, three to six of which would be major category events. But as the 2022 season enters its final month, it has so far fallen short of these expectations. Click here to continue reading

York U researchers’ revamped AI tool makes water dramatically safer in refugee camps

PUBLISHED: 04 November 2022

Water Canada

A team of researchers from York University’s Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research and Lassonde School of Engineering have revamped their Safe Water Optimization Tool (SWOT) with multiple innovations that will help aid workers unlock potentially life-saving information from water-quality data regularly collected in humanitarian settings. Click here to continue reading

The Canada Infrastructure Bank invests in shíshálh Nation Government District-owned wastewater treatment plant

PUBLISHED: 03 November 2022

Water Canada

Canada Infrastructure Bank (CIB) and the shíshálh Nation Government District (sNGD) announced financial close on an agreement, which will see the CIB lend more than $6 million to support a new Port Stalashen Wastewater Treatment Plant through its Indigenous Community Infrastructure Initiative. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Climate crisis brings growing numbers of unusual jellyfish to UK seas

PUBLISHED: 03 November 2022

The Guardian

Britain’s seas are becoming populated with large groups of unusual jellyfish owing to climate breakdown, a survey by the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) has found. Between 1 October 2021 and 30 September 2022, there were a total of 1,315 jellyfish sightings reported to the MCS. Eight jellyfish species are normally seen around the UK and Ireland but this year 11 were spotted, with more uncommon visitors now visiting these waters. Click here to continue reading

 

Compare and Contrast: EA head signals desire to change rule that exposes extent of river pollution

PUBLISHED: 03 November 2022

The Guardian 

The head of the Environment Agency has signalled he wants to change a key regulation on water quality which repeatedly exposes how English rivers are being choked in a cocktail of sewage and agricultural pollution. James Bevan, the chief executive of the Environment Agency, said he wanted to change the water framework directive, the law that provides a tough testing regime for English rivers. It provides a legal requirement that 75% of English rivers be in good health under its testing regime by 2027. Click here to continue reading

 

Pristine Alberta lake contaminated by dust from mountaintop coal mines: study

PUBLISHED: 03 November 2022

Global News

New Alberta government research has found windblown dust from mountaintop removal coal mines has polluted a pristine alpine lake to the point where its waters are as contaminated as lakes downwind from the oilsands. The paper, published last week in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, concludes that it’s crucial to consider more than just downstream effects from such mines. Click here to continue reading

 

Governments invest in infrastructure Projects in Berens River First Nation

PUBLISHED: 02 November 2022

Water Canada

The Honourable Dan Vandal, federal Minister of Northern Affairs, Minister for PrairiesCan, Minister for CanNor, on behalf of the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, federal Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Infrastructure and Communities, and Manitoba Labour, Consumer Protection and Government Services Minister Reg Helwer, announced more than $31.6 million in funding for four infrastructure projects in the Berens River area. Click here to continue reading

Whales ingest millions of microplastic particles a day, study finds

PUBLISHED: 02 November 2022

The Guardian

Filter-feeding whales are consuming millions of particles of microplastic pollution a day, according to a study, making them the largest consumers of plastic waste on the planet. The central estimate for blue whales was 10m pieces a day, meaning more than 1bn pieces could be ingested over a three- to four-month feeding season. The weight of plastic consumed over the season was estimated at between 230kg and 4 tonnes. Click here to continue reading

Final piece of Waterfront Toronto’s Stormwater Management System underway

PUBLISHED: 01 November 2022

Water Canada

Waterfront Toronto has begun work on the final piece of a large Stormwater Management System that services East Bayfront, the West Don Lands and future communities north of the Keating Channel. The final piece includes construction of in-water pipes along the section of the Water’s Edge Promenade (WEP) spanning the foot of Sherbourne Common from approximately Dockside Drive to the southern point of 15 Merchants’ Wharf, also known as the Aqualina at Bayside condos. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: 3.4 million people have been displaced by flooding in west and central Africa

PUBLISHED: 01 November 2022

CBC News

The UN’s refugee agency said Friday that destruction from flooding has displaced more than 3.4 million people in west and central Africa. UNHCR said Friday that Nigeria’s worst floods in a decade have killed hundreds, displaced 1.3 million residents and affected over 2.8 million people in the West African nation of 218 million. Survivors had to scurry for higher ground as water submerged farmland and infrastructure. Click here to continue reading

Expedition finds cache of cameras on remote Yukon glacier, 85 years after mountaineer left them behind

PUBLISHED: 01 November 2022

CBC News

After six days of searching the Walsh Glacier in Yukon’s Kluane National Park for a decades-old cache of cameras, Griffin Post’s expedition team was ready to pack it in. Half his crew had already flown out. Bad weather was about to set in. Time was ticking and the crew seemed no closer to finding the lost gear legendary mountaineer Bradford Washburn had stashed on the glacier 85 years before. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Thin fish, small catches: can Japan’s sushi culture survive climate crisis?

PUBLISHED: 31 October 2022

The Guardian

There is little at Shiogama seafood market to suggest that Japanese consumers could one day be deprived of their favourite seafood – from giant crab’s legs simmering in a winter nabe hotpot to spheres of salmon roe resting on a bed of rice wrapped in nori seaweed. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Scrapping farm nature payments may worsen English river pollution up to 20%

PUBLISHED: 29 October 2022

The Guardian

Weakening or scrapping the nature-friendly farming payment schemes could increase river pollution by up to 20%, an analysis has found. The payments are due to replace the EU’s area-based payments scheme, in which farmers are paid for the amount of land they manage. The new system would instead pay land managers to provide “public goods” such as enhanced nature and clean rivers. Click here to continue reading

After summer of drought, B.C. braces for atmospheric river

PUBLISHED: 29 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

An atmospheric river packing “narrow bands of heavy precipitation” is forecast for parts of British Columbia just a week after numerous high temperature records were set amid concerns of drought. A bulletin issued by the Public Safety Ministry warns that residents in the Lower Mainland, on Vancouver Island and on the north and central coasts can expect stormy weather through to Halloween. Click here to continue reading

Ottawa should help B.C. create better flood relief plan, Senate report finds

PUBLISHED: 29 October 2022

CBC News

A new Senate report is calling on the federal government to work with the provincial and local governments in B.C. to create a better, more comprehensive flood relief plan to protect the Fraser Valley from disastrous flooding in the future. The Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry released its findings on Thursday after hearing from nearly two dozen witnesses about the disastrous effects of flooding last November and the support the province offered in the aftermath. Click here to continue reading

Small hail, big damage; big hail, small damage

PUBLISHED: 29 October 2022

The Western Producer

An area in Alberta known as hail alley could potentially experience larger hail but fewer hailstorms due to climate change, said a scientist whose team discovered the biggest hailstone ever found in Canada. Storms with large amounts of smaller hail are more destructive for crops than events with large hail. Click here to continue reading

Farmers get much needed bumper crop coming off of drought in 2021

PUBLISHED: 29 October 2022

Calgary Herald

Farmers’ prayers were answered this year with an above-average harvest, coming off of the worst drought in a generation and all-time high costs for inputs. The most expensive crop in Canadian history may in fact turn out to be a profitable one for Alberta producers. Harvest was completed weeks ahead of time, beating cooler temperatures and snow. The south region posted yields 18 per cent above the five-year average. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Battle of the Alps? Water woes loom amid climate change

PUBLISHED: 29 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

For the first time in four years, after a pandemic lull, government envoys from eight Alpine countries — big, small and tiny — are holding a two-day meeting in Brig, southern Switzerland, under a grouping known as the Alpine Convention, set up 30 years ago to help coordinate life, leisure and the limited resources from Europe’s most celebrated peaks. Click here to continue reading

Dry temps speed up harvest in Alberta but degrade soil moisture levels

PUBLISHED: 29 October 2022

CTV News

With the harvest in Alberta completed and ahead of schedule, largely thanks to drier, warmer weather this season, provincial forecasting indicates soil moisture levels have degraded and may impact next year’s crops. As of the last crop report for this season released on Oct. 11, the province estimates around 99 per cent of all crops have been harvested — two to three weeks ahead of the five-year average for the second growing season in a row. Click here to continue reading

Ocean Legacy Foundation launches updated EPIC Academy and expands global education on ocean plastic pollution

PUBLISHED: 29 October 2022

Water Canada

Ocean Legacy Foundation (“OLF”), a Canadian non-profit organization that develops and implements worldwide plastic pollution emergency response programs, with the goal to end plastic pollution, today announced that with the success of EPIC Academy’s 2021 pilot launch, they are globally launching the updated online curriculum. Click here to continue reading

City of Red Deer drops Red Cross swim program

PUBLISHED: 27 October 2022

Red Deer Advocate

The City of Red Deer is switching swimming programs. As of winter registration in December, the Lifesaving Society, Swim for Life program will be offered instead of the previous Canadian Red Cross Swim program. This could change participants’ swim levels, as what’s required at each level will differ. Click here to continue reading

Rewilding a school wetland is a lesson in climate resilience

PUBLISHED: 27 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The wetland will provide a habitat for endemic plants and animals and serve as an outdoor classroom for students, said Sheldon Etheridge, the School District 72 teacher who spearheaded the project. Nothing underscores the importance of protecting or restoring wetlands at a community level like drought conditions across the province provoked by a global climate crisis. Vancouver Island and much of the B.C. coast, often dubbed the “Wet Coast”, has been anything but — with minimal rain and high temperatures in August, September and much of October. Click here to continue reading

COVID-19 wastewater surveillance networks established in New Brunswick

PUBLISHED: 26 October 2022

Water Canada

COVID-19 wastewater surveillance networks are being established in the province. The initial pilot sites include the greater Moncton area and Natoaganeg First Nation. Additional sites are being investigated with support from the provincial and federal governments. Click here to continue reading

B.C. producers face unusual weather

PUBLISHED: 26 October 2022

The Western Producer

Producers were keeping an eye on unusual weather conditions this fall that have affected much of British Columbia less than a year after some of the worst flooding in provincial history. More than 150 daytime temperature records were set across B.C. in September alone, and many regions have had little precipitation since July. Drought conditions caused the deaths of thousands of spawning salmon as waterways became too low to support them. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sunshine in sight? La Niña weather pattern to end in early 2023, BoM predicts

PUBLISHED: 26 October 2022

The Guardian

Sunny skies may finally be on the horizon, with Bureau of Meteorology modelling suggesting an end to the La Niña weather pattern early next year. The long run of wet weather over many parts of Australia has been driven by three consecutive years of La Niña events, which result in increased rainfall across northern and eastern Australia. During a La Niña, strong trade winds blow west across the Pacific Ocean. Warm surface water is pushed towards Asia and the seas north of Australia, resulting in higher rainfall than normal across the country’s north-east. The weather event has the inverse effect across the Pacific, with 60% of the US declared to be in a designated drought zone last week. Click here to continue reading

Walkerton Clean Water Centre hosts high school students as they learn about careers in drinking water

PUBLISHED: 26 October 2022

Water Canada

The Walkerton Clean Water Centre (WCWC) recently had the opportunity to host 75 students from John Diefenbaker Senior School in Hanover, Ontario. As part of a WaterWORKS event organized by the Sustainability Project, high school students spent the morning of October 24 at WCWC to learn about careers in the water industry and tour the Technology Demonstration Facility. Students also had the chance to perform tests for water turbidity to get a feel for some of the work done by water system operators. Presentations by the Sustainability Project on the Walkerton water crisis, circular economy, water conservation and stormwater management completed the morning. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Australian governments urged to scrap ‘one-in-100-year’ flood standard and update risk maps

PUBLISHED: 26 October 2022

The Guardian

Climate change is rendering terms like “one-in-100-year” flood useless and flood maps across Australia need to be uniformly updated immediately so communities and agencies can better mitigate disasters, experts say. The call to standardise flood mapping comes during flood crises in New South Wales and Victoria, and concerns over continued development on flood plains due to old maps. Flood maps are created using historical weather records, tide data and digital mapping technologies to assess the risks of an area, including how rivers cope with rising levels and how water runs over the land. Click here to continue reading

Brian Indian of Onigaming First Nation is the 2022 National First Nations Water Leadership Award recipient

PUBLISHED: 26 October 2022

Water Canada

Each year, First Nations individuals and organizations from across Canada are recognized by their peers for demonstrating leadership and outstanding dedication to the advancement of clean and safe drinking water in First Nations communities through the National First Nations Water Leadership Award. Indigenous Services Canada is pleased to announce that Brian Indian of Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation is the recipient of the 2022 National First Nations Water Leadership Award. Click here to continue reading

Narwhals adapting to climate crisis by delaying migration, study finds

PUBLISHED: 25 October 2022

The Guardian

Narwhals have been delaying their seasonal migration because of the impact of the climate crisis, suggesting an ability to adapt to the changing Arctic but increasing the risk that they may become trapped in ice, according to new research. Narwhals, recognisable by their long spiralled tusk that has earned them the nickname “unicorns of the sea”, inhabit the Arctic waters of Greenland, Canada and Russia. They are a migratory species that spend summer months in ice-free coastal areas before moving to deeper waters between late September and mid-November. Click here to continue reading

Winnipeg swings from historic drought last year to wettest year on record in 2022

PUBLISHED: 25 October 2022

CBC News

Historic drought devastated Manitoba’s agricultural and farming sectors last year only for the pendulum to swing strongly in the other, wetter direction this year in Winnipeg. As of Monday morning, the Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport weather station had recorded over 739 millimetres of precipitation in the city, “making this the wettest year for precipitation totals,” said Environment Canada meteorologist Natalie Hasell. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Colorado to reuse water for drinking, creating new supply

PUBLISHED: 24 October 2022

Winnipeg Free Press

Brewing beer, cooking food, and refilling water bottles with recycled wastewater could soon become standard practice in a state that’s synonymous with its pristine-tasting snowmelt and mountain springs. Last week, Colorado’s water quality agency gave unanimous preliminary approval to regulate direct potable reuse — the process of treating sewage and sending it directly to taps without first being dispersed in a larger water body. Pending a final vote in November, the state would become the first to adopt direct potable reuse regulations, according to state and federal officials. Click here to continue reading

Tire particles can impact fresh water

PUBLISHED: 24 October 2022

Science Daily

Ever wonder what happens to the rubber tread that wears off a vehicle’s tires? New modelling by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests an increasing amount of microplastics — fragments from tires and roadways — are ending up in lakes and streams. The UBCO School of Engineering researchers developed a conceptual framework to examine the potential contamination originating from the regular use of vehicles on roads and highways. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Lismore residents warned of major flooding as heavy rain falls along the east coast

PUBLISHED: 24 October 2022

The Guardian

Lismore residents have been warned to brace for another round of flooding as heavy rain fell along the east coast, and the Murray River town of Echuca-Moama anxiously waited to see if its levees would hold back the forecast peak on Sunday. Meanwhile thousands of New South Wales residents were bracing for flash flooding, falling trees and landslides with heavy rain and thunderstorms forecast over the next few days. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Rains threaten South American wheat

PUBLISHED: 24 October 2022

The Western Producer

There are signs that South America’s grain crops could be disappointing in 2022-23, says an analyst. Excessive rainfall is threatening the wheat crop in Parana in southern Brazil, said Michael Cordonnier, analyst with the Soybean & Corn Advisor newsletter. Parana is the second biggest wheat producing state in the country. Parts of the state have received as much as 275 millimetres of rain in October and there is more in the forecast. Click here to continue reading

First snowfall hits Calgary harder than expected

PUBLISHED: 24 October 2022

CTV News

ENMAX worked to restore power to homes in Upper Mount Royal, Bankview, Sunalta, Scarboro, Braeside and Cedarbrae early Saturday morning as heavy, wet snow turned out the lights in a few Calgary neighbourhoods. That was just one of the fallouts from a heavier-than-anticipated overnight snowfall that blanketed Calgary. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Hurricane Roslyn brings heavy rain, high waves as it makes landfall in Mexico

PUBLISHED: 24 October 2022

CBC News

Hurricane Roslyn slammed into a sparsely populated stretch of Mexico’s Pacific coast between the resorts of Puerto Vallarta and Mazatlan Sunday morning and quickly moved inland. By Sunday morning, Roslyn had winds of 150 km/h, down from its peak of 209 km/h. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Roslyn was about 150 kilometres east-southeast of the resort of Mazatlan. Click here to continue reading

Storms, floods and fire: Extreme weather forces Canadians to leave home for good

PUBLISHED: 24 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

After a flood swept through town four years ago, Grand Forks city council was faced with a heart-rending decision that will become all the more common as climate change intensifies extreme weather events: rebuild or move. The British Columbia community, nestled at the confluence of the Granby and Kettle rivers, experienced the worst flooding the area had seen in 70 years, and ultimately decided to buy out about 100 properties, roping off a whole area of the community from future development. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Weather tracker: ‘triple-dip’ La Niña heightens drought in US

PUBLISHED: 24 October 2022

The Guardian

The US drought monitor declared 60% of the country to be in a designated drought zone last Thursday, with 34% in a severe or deepening drought. Although such conditions are not unusual in the US, with approximately 14% of the country having experienced severe to extreme drought every year since 1895, the extent of the current situation certainly is. Click here to continue reading

 

Research: Modifying water’s structure as low-energy method for removing pollutants

PUBLISHED: 21 October 2022

Water Canada

Fresh water is a finite resource vulnerable to contamination. Researchers from the University of Guelph and scientists from the Canadian Light Source at the University of Saskatchewan are developing low-energy strategies to purify polluted water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Nature is striking back’: flooding around the world, from Australia to Venezuela

PUBLISHED: 21 October 2022

The Guardian

It has been a drenched 2022 for many parts of the world, at times catastrophically so. A year of disastrous flooding perhaps reached its nadir in Pakistan, where a third of the country was inundated by heavy rainfall from June, killing more than 1,000 people in what António Guterres, the UN secretary general, called an unprecedented natural disaster. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Months after floods, Brazil’s Amazon faces severe drought

PUBLISHED: 21 October 2022

CBC News

Just months after enduring floods that destroyed crops and submerged entire communities, thousands of families in the Brazilian Amazon are now dealing with severe drought that, at least in some areas, is the worst in decades. The low level of the Amazon River, at the centre of the largest drainage system in the world, has put dozens of municipalities under alert. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Bodies of water all over North America are drying up due to drought, climate change: Experts

PUBLISHED: 21 October 2022

ABC News

Bodies of water all over North America are drying up as a result of drought and a decrease in precipitation, experts told ABC News. Earlier this year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted that the 22-year megadrought affecting the West would not only intensify but also move eastward. That prediction appears to be coming into fruition, with about 82% of the continental U.S. currently showing conditions between abnormally dry and exceptional drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Click here to continue reading

Why volunteers scoop thousands of fish out of Alberta irrigation canals each year

PUBLISHED: 20 October 2022

CBC News

Throughout the warmer months, Alberta’s irrigation networks play a crucial role in the province. They transfer water from rivers and reservoirs, delivering it to rural communities, to farmers and to recreational areas, supporting some wildlife along the way. But along with the water comes the fish. And in the fall, when the irrigation networks shut down, thousands of them become stranded. Click here to continue reading

Next pandemic may come from melting glaciers, new data shows

PUBLISHED: 20 October 2022

The Guardian

The next pandemic may come not from bats or birds but from matter in melting ice, according to new data. Genetic analysis of soil and lake sediments from Lake Hazen, the largest high Arctic freshwater lake in the world, suggests the risk of viral spillover – where a virus infects a new host for the first time – may be higher close to melting glaciers. Click here to continue reading

Calamity of ocean heating goes deeper than we thought

PUBLISHED: 20 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The amount of heat accumulating in the ocean is accelerating and penetrating ever deeper, with widespread effects on extreme weather events and marine life, according to a new scientific review. One of the report’s authors said the devastating floods in eastern Australia had likely been made worse by warming oceans. The risks would continue to rise as the ocean took up more heat, the report said. Click here to continue reading

Severe drought torments British Columbia, a year after devastating floods

PUBLISHED: 19 October 2022

The Guardian

Nearly a year ago, flood waters inundated swaths of south-western British Columbia. Mudslides destroyed sections of highways and swollen, turbid rivers washed away houses and bridges. Now, the region has the opposite problem: months of drought have begun to take a toll on what was once dubbed Canada’s “wet coast”. Click here to continue reading

2 years after catastrophic flood, northern Alberta hamlet reckons with repairs and relocation

PUBLISHED: 19 October 2022

CBC News

It was early in the morning of April 27, 2020, when the Peace River, blocked by chunks of ice, started rising quickly in the northern Alberta hamlet of Fort Vermilion. Soon it was rushing toward buildings near the river banks. As it approached their front steps, Charles LaForge and Lucille Labrecque fled to a family member’s house on higher ground. Click here to continue reading

Premier Smith ‘open to revisiting’ Springbank dam decision for southern Alberta flooding

PUBLISHED: 18 October 2022

Global News

Alberta’s premier is “open to revisiting” an approved upstream flood mitigation project designed to protect the province’s largest city. Saturday morning on “Your Province. Your Premier” on Corus Radio stations, a caller named “Nick” asked Premier Danielle Smith to gauge her openness on revisiting the Springbank Off-stream Reservoir (SR1) approval, recalling her previous commentary as a talk radio host. Click here to continue reading

State of emergency declared on B.C.’s Sunshine Coast because of drought

PUBLISHED: 18 October 2022

CBC News

According to the order, the Sunshine Coast Regional District (SCRD) has secured the water supply through early November but is using the emergency order “to further secure and expand water supply should there be no significant rainfall on the Sunshine Coast in the coming weeks.” Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Floods expected to cause widespread damage to winter crops in ‘another blow’ to Australian farmers

PUBLISHED: 18 October 2022

The Guardian

Widespread damage to winter cereal crops such as wheat, barley and canola is expected as ongoing flooding threatens farms and regional businesses across some of the nation’s major agricultural regions. But Australian grower representatives said it was still too early to gauge the extent of flood damage on food supply and market prices. Click here to continue reading

Amount of ocean heat found to be accelerating and fuelling extreme weather events

PUBLISHED: 18 October 2022

The Guardian 

The amount of heat accumulating in the ocean is accelerating and penetrating ever deeper, with widespread effects on extreme weather events and marine life, according to a new scientific review. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: More than 80% of US waterways contaminated by ‘forever chemicals’

PUBLISHED: 18 October 2022

The Guardian

Most of America’s waterways are likely contaminated by toxic PFAS “forever chemicals”, a new study conducted by US water keepers finds. The Waterkeeper Alliance analysis found detectable PFAS levels in 95 out of 114, or 83%, of waterways tested across 34 states and the District of Columbia, and frequently at levels that exceed federal and state limits. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Nigeria races to save flood victims as death toll tops 600

PUBLISHED: 18 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The death toll from floods in Nigeria this year has increased to 603 as local authorities race to get relief items to hundreds of thousands being evacuated from their submerged homes. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced by the disaster, which has affected people across 33 of Nigeria’s 36 states, the nation’s humanitarian affairs ministry said late Sunday. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Barges stranded as Mississippi River water levels reach critical low

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

The Guardian

The water in the Mississippi River has dropped so low that barges are getting stuck, leading to expensive dredging and at least one recent traffic jam of more than 2,000 vessels backed up. The Mississippi River Basin produces nearly all – 92% – of US agricultural exports, and 78% of the global exports of feed grains and soybeans. The recent drought has dropped water levels to alarmingly low levels that are causing shipping delays, and seeing the costs of alternative transport, such as rail, rise. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The cost to capture carbon? More water and electricity

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

The Guardian

Operating enough carbon capture to keep the climate crisis in check would double humanity’s water use, according to University of California, Berkeley researchers. Regardless of the method being used – on a power plant or capturing carbon directly from the air – more power and more water will be needed. The Cleco proposal provides an object lesson in how one solution can exacerbate another problem. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Alaska cancels snow crab season over population decline

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

The Guardian

Alaska officials have cancelled the upcoming snow crab season, due to population decline across the Bering Sea. The fall Bristol Bay red king crab harvest will not happen. The winter harvest of smaller snow crab has also been cancelled for the first time. The causes of the population collapse are being researched but likely include increased predation and stresses from warmer water, which the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believes may have prompted the crabs to shift away from coasts. Click here to continue reading

Researchers look to Canada’s oceans to sink planet-warming carbon

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Canada may have the longest total coastline in the world, but it still doesn’t have a solid understanding of the role nearshore ecosystems can play in sinking greenhouse gas emissions to combat the climate crisis, marine ecologist Julia Baum says. “We’re not really accounting for ocean climate solutions right now, which is ironic because we have three oceans.” Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The Mediterranean Sea is so hot, it’s forming CO2-belching crystals

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

If you stand on the coast of Israel and gaze out across the Mediterranean Sea, you’ll spy deep-blue, calm waters that have sustained humans for millennia. Beneath the surface, though, something odd is unfolding: A process called stratification is messing with the way the sea processes carbon dioxide. Click here to continue reading

The case for embracing water re-use in Canada

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

Water Canada

There is a perception that Canada has an abundant freshwater supply. In some regions of the country, where drought conditions do not exist, this is certainly the case. There are, at times, large volumes of freshwater available. But this is by no means the case for the entire country. In some parts of Canada, we are, in fact, in a water deficit. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flooding in southeast Australia could swamp or isolate 34,000 homes

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Around 34,000 homes could be inundated or isolated in Victoria state as a flood emergency continues across parts of Australia’s southeast, an official said Monday. Victoria is the worst-affected state with some towns experiencing the highest river peaks in decades. The states of New South Wales and Tasmania were also experiencing flooding in an emergency that began last week. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: U.S. winter wheat farmers plant into dust as Plains drought persists

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

The Western Producer

With planting roughly halfway complete, the 2023 U.S. hard red winter wheat crop is already being hobbled by drought in the heart of the southern Plains, wheat experts said. Planting plans may be scaled back in the U.S. breadbasket despite historically high prices for this time of year, reflecting rising global demand and thin world wheat supplies projected to end the 2022/23 marketing year at a six-year low. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: England could be in drought beyond spring 2023, say ministers

PUBLISHED: 17 October 2022

The Guardian

England could be in drought beyond spring 2023, ministers have said, after record low rainfall has left the country short on water. The news will be particularly problematic for farmers, who were hoping for a damp autumn and winter to refill reservoirs so they could plant and harvest crops into next year. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Australia floods: Three states issue evacuation orders after heavy rain

PUBLISHED: 14 October 2022

BBC News

Communities in three Australian states have been ordered to evacuate as torrential rain brings major flooding. Parts of the country have received up to four times their average October rainfall in just 24 hours. At least 500 homes have been flooded, one person has died and another is missing as the disaster unfolds. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Amid historic drought, California approves $140 million desalination plant

PUBLISHED: 14 October 2022

Reuters

California regulators unanimously approved a $140 million desalination plant on Thursday, offering a guideline for how the state can convert ocean water into drinking water amid the worst drought in 1,200 years. Just five months ago, the same Coastal Commission had unanimously rejected a much larger and privately owned plant, citing environmental concerns. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Low river levels curb American grain exports

PUBLISHED: 14 October 2022

The Western Producer

Numerous barges have run aground on the lower Mississippi River and grain barge shipping rates are soaring to historic highs as drought drops inland waterways to levels not seen in decades. With little rain in the forecast, the low water levels are hampering already sluggish grain exports at the U.S. Gulf Coast, where some 60 percent of U.S. corn, soybean and wheat exports exit the country. Click here to continue reading

Meetings will discuss Milk River’s future

PUBLISHED: 14 October 2022

The Western Producer

The future use and water flows of the Milk River, which snakes across the Canada-U.S. border, could be determined by a good turnout of southern Alberta stakeholders at an upcoming meeting. Water allocations from the St. Mary’s and Milk rivers have been governed by an intricate management agreement between Canada and the U.S. for more than 100 years. But failure of a Montana canal that regulated flow rates between the two rivers in 2020, combined with challenges associated with climate change, have led governments in both countries to re-evaluate the treaty. Click here to continue reading

Dry weather shifts Calgary’s rivers into ‘winter slow flow’ sooner than expected

PUBLISHED: 14 October 2022

CTV News

Calgary’s recent long stretch of warm dry weather is having an effect on the Bow and Elbow rivers, but officials with the City of Calgary say the water supply is in good shape. Downstream around Calgary it may not appear that water is scarce, even though river sources upstream in the mountains west of Calgary received less then half of expected summer precipitation. Click here to continue reading

Metro Vancouver residents urged to shorten showers, stop watering lawns as drought persists

PUBLISHED: 14 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Water use in Metro Vancouver is much higher, while reservoir levels are lower than normal, prompting the regional district to ask millions of residents and businesses to conserve. A statement from the regional district of Metro Vancouver says water use is up by 20 per cent for this time of year because of the extended dry, warm weather. Click here to continue reading

B.C. government prepares for flooding when drought inevitably ends

PUBLISHED: 14 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The British Columbia government says it’s ready to deploy sand bags and tiger dams in case flooding follows the ongoing drought. Emergency Management BC says when rain falls after long dry spells, the parched soil can increase runoff and river flow. It says the transition to the rainy season doesn’t typically cause extensive flooding and the devastation wreaked by last year’s atmospheric rivers was rare. Click here to continue reading

Shuswap Watershed Council publishes Phosphorus Action Plan

PUBLISHED: 14 October 2022

Water Canada

The Shuswap Watershed Council (SWC) has just published a new document to encourage residents in the Shuswap to take steps that will protect water quality. The ‘Phosphorus Action Plan’ provides guidance to everyone living and/or working in the Shuswap about how to reduce the amount of phosphorus being released into the watershed. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Microplastics found in 75% of fish in New Zealand, report shows

PUBLISHED: 13 October 2022

The Guardian

Microplastics are found in three of every four of New Zealand’s fish, huge portions of indigenous seabirds and marine species are threatened with extinction, and warmer oceans are becoming uninhabitable to native species, a stark new government report on the state of the country’s oceans has found. Click here to continue reading

Infinitii ai launches expanded product portfolio for water infrastructure under infinitii dataworks platform

PUBLISHED: 13 October 2022

Water Canada

Vancouver-based infinitii ai, which is consolidating FlowWorks and Carl Data Solutions under its new company name, has announced an ambitious software portfolio for Smart City Water infrastructure customers marketed under the umbrella of the infinitii dataworks platform. Click here to continue reading

Drought and moths push Stanley Park’s trees to the brink in Vancouver

PUBLISHED: 13 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

First came the moths. Then came the drought. The trees of Stanley Park, typically the green jewel of Vancouver’s downtown core, just can’t catch a break. Experts say large numbers of browning trees appear dead or dying, because of a one-two combination of foliage-munching grubs and an exceptionally dry weather spell, with the last appreciable rain falling in Vancouver on Sept. 4. Click here to continue reading

B.C. First Nations seek action on sturgeon deaths caused by dam

PUBLISHED: 13 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Three British Columbia First Nations want the provincial and federal governments to live up to a nine-month-old court decision that said there is “overwhelming” evidence a dam on the Nechako River is killing endangered sturgeon. They are highlighting the ruling after scientists asked the public in September for help in solving the mysterious deaths of 11 adult sturgeon found in the Nechako River in central B.C. Click here to continue reading

How climate change is shifting the water cycle

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

DW News

Put simply, the water cycle — also known as the hydrological cycle — is the process by which water moves through the Earth’s land, seas and atmosphere. Water in its three natural phases, be it gas, liquid or solid, forms part of the natural cycle that continuously refreshes the supply of water that we, and every other living thing, need to survive. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Green Hydrogen Revolution Risks Dying of Thirst

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

Energy Now

Terry Kallis cancelled development of a 6-gigawatt green hydrogen facility in South Australia in May. His Kallis Energy Investments encountered an insurmountable problem: a lack of water. It’s just one of the 680 or so large-scale hydrogen projects under consideration around the world, per the Hydrogen Council, which estimates some $700 billion of investment is needed by 2030 to hit net-zero emissions targets. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: This California City Is Rapidly Running Out of Water

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

Gizmodo

Coalinga, California, is set to run out of water before the end of this year. The city’s only water source is an aqueduct that is managed by the federal government. Officials think that the water is going to run dry before the end of 2022, the Washington Post reported. Local officials are scrambling for options. If their water supply comes up short, Coalinga politicians are going to have to buy water from the open market. Click here to continue reading

House in Alberta built from more than 1M recycled plastic water bottles

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

Global News

Just outside Millet, Alta., there’s a home built entirely from recycled plastic water bottles. Ecoplast Solutions has almost finished turning 1.2 million empty water bottles into a house. The process sees bottles broken down and turned into building panels. They’re water resistant and strong enough to withstand a Category 5 hurricane. The building panels also act as insulation and don’t require vapor barriers. Click here to continue reading

One of the world’s largest freshwater deltas is shrinking. Here’s why.

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

CBC News

Every year, scientists, elders and community members gather near Fort Chipewyan, Alta., for an annual camp to test the health of the fish population in the Peace-Athabasca Delta, the second-largest freshwater of its kind in the world. While the people who live in the area are accustomed to the impacts of industry and climate change, they say the landscape is being altered more now than ever before. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Shanghai says water supplies ‘normal’ after shortage scare sparks hoarding

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

The Guardian

A wave of panic buying has swept Shanghai in recent days, as rumours swirled of drinking water shortages despite assurances from local authorities that supplies remained normal. Record-breaking droughts in China dried up parts of the Yangtze River, and prompted saltwater intrusions into the estuary and depleted reservoirs feeding Shanghai, which sits at the mouth of the crucial river. Click here to continue reading

Call for Indigenous case studies: Knowledge dialogue on Indigenous knowledge in water management

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

Water Canada

The upcoming online Knowledge Dialogue on the “Application of Indigenous Knowledge in Water Management: Best Practice Models” taking place on November 22, 2022, from 11:00 am – 1:00 pm EST, is designed to be a community-driven knowledge-sharing session on Indigenous and Traditional Ecological Knowledge best practices for freshwater management. Click here to continue reading

‘Arrival of a new Arctic’: Study predicts Arctic rainy days will double by 2100

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

CTV News

While the Arctic is better known for blankets of snow than rain clouds, new research suggests the number of rainy days in the region will roughly double by the end of this century. The study, published in the American Geophysical Union journal Earth’s Future, used climate modelling to predict changes in precipitation under a high level of greenhouse gas emissions from 2015 to 2100. Click here to continue reading

‘River guardians’ search for source of microplastics fouling Rivière Magog in Eastern Townships

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

CBC News

Over the last few weeks, Gabriel Provencher-Pharand has been criss-crossing the Rivière Magog in a small motor boat, searching for tiny bits of plastic that have washed up on the banks. The Magog flows from Lake Memphremagog, in Quebec’s Eastern Townships, through Lac Magog and past the city of Sherbrooke on the Lac des Nations before emptying into the Rivière Saint-François, a tributary of the St. Lawrence River. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘The US dammed us up’: how drought is threatening Navajo ties to ancestral lands

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

The Guardian

Over the last three decades, the Navajo Nation – the largest Indigenous nation in the US – has felt the impacts of a warming planet much earlier and more dramatically than other communities in the south-west that have well-developed municipal infrastructure and abundant financial resources. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: More rain feeds floods in northeastern and central Thailand

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

Sylvan Lake News

Heavy seasonal rains again pounded much of Thailand on Sunday, causing continued widespread flooding, particularly in the northeast and central regions. In the northeastern province of Ubon Ratchathani, almost 20,000 people have been moved into 85 temporary shelters as floodwaters overwhelmed more than 1,000 villages, the Department of Disaster Prevention and Mitigation reported. Click here to continue reading

Blue Economy: The challenges with protecting source water

PUBLISHED: 12 October 2022

Water Canada

What started as a discussion on protecting our source water became a deep dive into how climate change is impacting quality freshwater sourcing in Canada. In a country with so much water, it can be easy to take for granted that it will always be there, ready to pour out of our taps and through our sprinklers. Click here to continue reading

Western Irrigation District lowering lake levels

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

The Chestermere Anchor

The Western Irrigation District (WID) is lowering the water levels of Chestermere Lake on Oct. 10. The water levels are lowered every year in the fall to prepare for the winter season. The City of Chestermere will close the John Peake Park boat launch for the season when the WID lowers the water levels. Residents are reminded to ensure any watercraft is out of the water before the lake is lowered. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Missing snow could sink New Zealand ski areas

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

New Zealand’s Tūroa ski area is usually a white wonderland at this time of year, its deep snowpack supporting its famed spring skiing. This season, it’s largely a barren moonscape, with tiny patches of snow poking out between vast fields of jagged volcanic boulders. The ski area was forced to close for the season this week, three weeks earlier than planned. Click here to continue reading

‘Bone dry or soaking wet,’ water study faces extremes

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

The Western Producer

Farmers learned a lot from the real-world whiplashing experiment you could call “Farming in 2021-22.” “Make sure your dugouts are deep enough,” said Ridgeville, Man., farmer Neil Claringbould, when asked what he learned from the brutal drought of 2021, as he showed other farmers and researchers one of his new water retention dams on a stream on his land. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: 10,000 litres a day for each pitch: Qatar World Cup’s huge impact on Gulf waters

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

The Guardian

As the World Cup approaches, Qatar is going to need at least 10,000 litres of water every day for each of its stadium pitches. Based in a region with virtually no access to fresh water, it is going to rely on desalination – the practice of debrining saltwater so it is drinkable. It seems like an elegant solution – but the problem is that desalination, which is projected to boom by 37% across the Gulf region in the next five years, has huge environmental costs, in terms of the fossils fuels used to carry out the process, and the marine environment. Click here to continue reading

No reason to review rejected proposed feedlot near Pigeon Lake, Alta., regulator says

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

CBC News

An Alberta regulator has turned down a request to review its decision rejecting a proposed cattle feedlot near a popular recreational lake. The Natural Resources Conservation Board said in a ruling released Thursday that there’s no reason to revisit the August decision, which denied a permit for the 4,000-head feedlot near Pigeon Lake, about 100 kilometres southwest of Edmonton. Click here to continue reading

Salmon struggle to spawn amid record-setting drought, with hundreds dead in B.C.

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

CBC News

After three parched months, much of B.C. is experiencing drought and ongoing hot weather has left streams running dry, leaving no way for some salmon to return to their spawning grounds, killing hundreds in a mass die-off on the province’s central coast. The situation has scientists and salmon watchers concerned. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Great Salt Lake on path to hyper-salinity, mirroring Iranian lake

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

Science Daily

Starved for freshwater, the Great Salt Lake is getting saltier. The lake is losing sources of freshwater input to agriculture, urban growth and drought, and the drawdown is causing salt concentrations to spike beyond even the tolerance of brine shrimp and brine flies, according to Wayne Wurtsbaugh from Watershed Sciences in the Quinney College of Natural Resources. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Three years in, California’s drought continues with no relief in sight

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

California has witnessed its three driest years on record and the drought shows no signs of abating, officials said on Monday. The dry spell set the stage for catastrophic wildfires and has strained water resources and caused conflicts over usage. Click here to continue reading

Rebuilding after Hurricane Fiona

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

Water Canada

In the wake of Hurricane Fiona’s devastation, thousands are rebuilding their homes and communities, and businesses of all sizes are getting back on their feet. The Government of Canada will continue to respond to the immediate needs of people impacted by the storm and support the long-term recovery of impacted regions and local economies. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba funds economic initiatives for Indigenous communities involved in Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels project

PUBLISHED: 07 October 2022

Water Canada

The Manitoba government is developing a new $15-million fund to support Indigenous economic development opportunities related to the Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels Project, Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Doyle Piwniuk announced. The new fund will be administered as a proposal-based funding program, open to 39 Indigenous groups (First Nations, Métis and Northern Affairs communities, and Indigenous organizations) involved in the outlet channels project. Click here to continue reading

These plants soak up nutrients from manure. They may make feedlot water clean enough to drink

PUBLISHED: 05 October 2022

CBC News

On a feedlot in central Alberta, nearly 100 kilometres northeast of Calgary, researchers gathered to watch as floating islands were launched onto a pond created by runoff water. To people driving past on a nearby dirt road, it might not look like much. But the islands are the result of years of research and testing that could help the feedlot business recycle wastewater to the point where it could be used on crops or for cattle. And it could go beyond just that. Click here to continue reading

Surrey, B.C dyke upgrades to protect against flood and storm events

PUBLISHED: 05 October 2022

Water Canada 

The City of Surrey is in the first phase of upgrading the dyke network to protect against flooding from increasingly more common high magnitude storm events. As a next step in enhancing the network, the City will be applying for $10 million in funding to upgrade the Nicomekl River Dyke. Surrey Council endorsed an application for grant funding for the Nicomekl River Dyke Upgrade Project, from 168 Street to 188 Street for a total of $10 million through B.C.’s Green Adaptation, Resilience & Disaster Mitigation Program (ARDM) as part of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program. Click here to continue reading

Lake Minnewanka: Alberta’s underwater ghost town has deep history

PUBLISHED: 04 October 2022

Global News

Lake Minnewanka, Alta., is a sacred place, visited for centuries by Indigenous communities. The glacier-fed water of the lake nestled among the Rocky Mountains was said to heal physical and mental ailments. Today, the natural wonder is a tourist hot spot with a rich history that lies beneath. In the 1890s, Minnewanka Landing was a bustling, lakeside resort town. It’s a place that can now only be visited by venturing into the frigid waters. Click here to continue reading

NSW braces for more flash flooding as wet weather lashes Australia’s east coast

PUBLISHED: 04 October 2022

The Guardian

New South Wales is bracing for more flash flooding as another week of renewed rain lashes Australia’s already saturated east coast. The Bureau of Meteorology’s Gabrielle Woodhouse said two “very significant” weather systems were moving across NSW over the coming days, with rain and thunderstorms expected over inland parts of the state from Tuesday. Click here to continue reading

Scientists find ways to restore kelp forests

PUBLISHED: 04 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

For Liam Coleman, scuba diving in B.C. waters is like taking a weightless walk in the woods. “It’s a really beautiful, quite special experience to go diving into kelp forests …. It’s like you were walking weightless in space, but it has a forest around you,” said Coleman. After getting past the cold water, Coleman sees schools of fish swimming through the forests, golden sunlight reflecting through the water past the rows of kelp, and once in a while, a seal or sea lion comes by to surprise him. Click here to continue reading

Federal government failing to protect commercially valuable fish: report

PUBLISHED: 04 October 2022

CBC News

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is falling short when it comes to protecting endangered aquatic species, a new report tabled in the House of Commons on Tuesday said — particularly species that are commercially valuable. The 2022 Fall Reports from Environment and Sustainable Development Commissioner Jerry DeMarco found inadequate staffing, knowledge gaps and a bias against protecting species of commercial value at the department. Click here to continue reading

 

SDTC supports innovation from coast to coast

PUBLISHED: 04 October 2022

Water Canada

Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) has announced an investment of $18.7 million in six innovative Canadian companies working in sectors ranging from agriculture to aquaculture, to waste management and clean energy solutions. As the largest funder of sustainable small and medium-sized businesses in Canada, SDTC helps entrepreneurs attempting to do extraordinary things. To be truly transformational, these innovative ideas need to be deployed, not just once, but many times. Click here to continue reading

City reviewing the feasibility of recreational activities on storm ponds

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

Chestermere Anchor

City administration’s action plan includes classifying the type of pond, determining the in and out flow of the ponds, determining the frequency of testing the ice thickness, reviewing the time of year when the ponds would be considered the safest, and collecting data on the depth of the water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Jackson water crisis: Mississippi accused of ‘intolerable’ racial discrimination

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

The Guardian

The NAACP filed a federal complaint on Tuesday accusing Mississippi state officials of violating civil rights law by repeatedly diverting federal funds meant for ensuring safe drinking water away from the state’s predominantly Black capital, Jackson, to smaller, white communities. Their conduct amounted to racial discrimination and a devastating loss of access to drinking water for more than a month for residents in Jackson, where more than 80% of residents are Black and a quarter are in poverty. Click here to continue reading

Boil water advisory issued for Three Hills, Alta. due to ‘number of water main breaks’

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

CBC News

An Alberta Emergency Alert was issued for Three Hills, Alta. Thursday. In a critical update, the alert said the town is issuing a boil water advisory until further notice due to the number of water main breaks in the area. A notice from the town asked citizens to bring water to a rapid rolling boil for one minute prior to use and to preferably drink bottled water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Arctic Ocean acidifying up to four times as fast as other oceans, study finds

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

The Guardian

Acidification of the western Arctic Ocean is happening three to four times faster than in other ocean basins, a new study has found. The ocean, which absorbs a third of all of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, has grown more acidic because of fossil fuel use. Rapid loss of sea ice in the Arctic region over the past three decades has accelerated the rate of long-term acidification, according to the study, published in Science on Thursday. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Extreme rainfall from Hurricane Ian worsened by climate breakdown – study

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

The Guardian

Human-induced climate change increased the extreme rainfall brought by Hurricane Ian, which has devastated parts of Florida, by more than 10%, according to a new preliminary analysis. Ian has caused widespread damage and at least 21 deaths since crunching into south-west Florida on Wednesday, tearing asunder cities such as Fort Myers and Cape Coral with winds that reached close to 150mph and a storm surge that in places reached 18ft. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘A growing machine’: Scotland looks to vertical farming to boost tree stocks

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

The Guardian

Forestry and Land Scotland (FLS) wants to plant tens of millions of new trees in the coming years – conifers such as Norway and sitka spruce, douglas fir and Scots pine, and broadleaf varieties such as oak, alder and birch. In the open, it would take about 18 months to bring a tree seedling up to 40-50mm in height; in these units, that growing time is about 90 days. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The end of a way of life? Ranchers struggle to survive the south-west’s megadrought

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

The Guardian

About 25,000 cattle ranches are located in the American south-west. But as drought conditions worsen across the region, two-thirds of ranchers are reporting that they have had to sell off parts of their herds, according to a survey conducted by the American Farm Bureau Federation this summer. Average herd sizes are expected to have fallen 36% across the region in 2022, a figure that rises to 43% in New Mexico, and 50% in Texas. Click here to continue reading

Hidden Hero: Zhiibaahaasing water operator’s drive for safe drinking water

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

Water Canada

Zhiibaahaasing First Nation, on Manitoulin Island close to the northern shore of Lake Huron, is surrounded by clean, fresh water. Yet this community of 86 people has been under a boil water advisory since 1992 for a reason which might seem surprising. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: In the U.S., clean water is becoming a luxury

PUBLISHED: 03 October 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Much of the wider national water system traces to massive, state-funded postwar development projects, or retrofits to meet the new standards of the 1972 Clean Water Act. But the lifespan of a typical drinking water plant is 60 to 70 years. A 2020 report from the American Society of Civil Engineers says we’re in a “replacement era”: most drinking water pipes in the country need to be repaired or replaced by 2040. Click here to continue reading

Under water: Is the real estate industry waking up to ‘climate risk’?

PUBLISHED: 29 September 2022

Global News

Perched over a harbour across from the bright lights of Vancouver’s city centre, a massive new residential development is pushing the boundaries of what it means to be climate resilient. The development, called North Harbour, is being built by developer Concert Properties in North Vancouver to a set of novel standards that will mitigate against sea level rise and storm surge. The new requirement is for the project to be raised 4.5 metres above sea level, well over a metre above the previous requirement. None of the building’s mechanical equipment will be installed below ground, which is the norm, to prevent damage from flooding. Click here to continue reading

How the climate crisis is driving stronger storms further inland

PUBLISHED: 29 September 2022

The Guardian

“It’s all about the water,” warned meteorologists as Hurricane Fiona battered Puerto Rico last week and as category 4 Hurricane Ian edged closer and eventually hit Florida on Wednesday. The water refers to the rainfall and storm surge – both of which are becoming more intense and destructive thanks to global heating, changing the pattern of hurricanes across the world. Hurricane Fiona dumped more than 31in of rain over 72 hours across parts of Puerto Rico causing widespread flooding and landslides. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Hurricane Ian nears Florida with 250 km/h winds, just shy of Category 5 status

PUBLISHED: 28 September 2022

CTV News

Hurricane Ian’s most damaging winds began hitting Florida’s southwest coast Wednesday, lashing the state with heavy rain and pushing a devastating storm surge after strengthening to the threshold of the most dangerous Category 5 status. Fueled by warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Ian grew to a catastrophic Category 4 hurricane overnight with top winds of 155 mph (250 km/h), according to the National Hurricane Center. Click here to continue reading

Next generation of Indigenous water treatment operators ready to support local water quality

PUBLISHED: 28 September 2022

Water Canada

Last week, Waabnoong Bemjiwang Association of First Nations (WBAFN), Gezhtoojig Employment & Training, Anishinabek Nation and Water First Education & Training Inc. celebrated the graduation of 14 interns from the Georgian Bay Drinking Water Internship Program. This program is a paid internship that recruits young Indigenous adults to the drinking water field, and helps them obtain entry-level certifications required to begin their careers in water treatment. Having qualified, local personnel also supports communities in having access to safe, clean drinking water for the long term. Click here to continue reading

Canada invests over $3.9 million to support the Great Lakes

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

Water Canada

Protecting fresh water is critically important to Canada’s environmental, social, and economic well-being. One of the largest surface freshwater systems in the world, the Great Lakes help drive the local economy and provide drinking water for millions of Canadians. Click here to continue reading

Feedlot owner wants review of decision to deny expansion near Pigeon Lake

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

Global News

A feedlot owner wants a regulatory board to take another look at its decision to deny his request to expand his operation near a popular recreational lake in central Alberta. Greg Thalen of G&S Farms had proposed a 4,000-head feedlot near the shores of Pigeon Lake in the County of Wetaskiwin. Pigeon Lake, about 70 kilometres southwest of Edmonton, has about 5,800 seasonal and permanent residents and attracts about 100,000 visitors a year to its leafy setting, beaches, boating and fishing. Click here to continue reading

Breakwater couldn’t save homes, road and fish plant from storm in northern Cape Breton

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

CBC News

People in northern Cape Breton are shocked by the strength of post-tropical storm Fiona, which devastated the small community of New Haven, near Neils Harbour, N.S. It destroyed a road and damaged the fish plant, some homes and boats. Roland Michaelis, operations manager for the Victoria Co-op Fisheries, said the plant commonly prepares for storms, but this time high tide coincided with the storm surge and created six-to-eight-metre waves. The plant is behind a breakwater, but even that didn’t help. Click here to continue reading

These natural wonders in Canada were lost to Fiona

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

CTV News

An iconic sandstone rock formation in P.E.I and a striking solitary tree in Nova Scotia are among the natural landmarks destroyed by post-tropical storm Fiona. Both destinations for photographers, the Teacup Rock and the Shubenacadie Tree are being mourned by residents and tourists alike as Atlantic Canada slowly takes stock of everything stripped from them in the storm. Teacup Rock was a teetering tower of sandstone hidden away in Thunder Cove Beach on Prince Edward Island. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Hurricane Ian hits Cuba, Florida braces for damage

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Hurricane Ian tore into western Cuba on Tuesday as a major hurricane, with nothing to stop it from intensifying into a catastrophic Category 4 hurricane before it hits Florida on Wednesday. Ian made landfall at 4:30 a.m. EDT Tuesday in Cuba’s Pinar del Rio province, where officials set up 55 shelters, evacuated 50,000 people, rushed in emergency personnel and took steps to protect crops in Cuba’s main tobacco-growing region. Click here to continue reading

‘Total devastation’ as Port aux Basques declares state of emergency due to post-tropical storm Fiona

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

CBC News

Communities in southwestern Newfoundland are grappling with significant damage, including lost homes, flooding and road washouts due to post-tropical storm Fiona. Everything east of town hall in Port aux Basques is under an emergency evacuation order as the town is pounded by severe winds and a storm surge. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: World Bank pledges US$2 billion for flood-ravaged Pakistan

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

CTV News

The World Bank said it will provide about US$2 billion in aid to Pakistan, ravaged by floods that have killed more than 1,600 people this year, the largest pledge of assistance so far. Unprecedented monsoon rains and flooding this year — which many experts attribute to climate change — have also injured some 13,000 people across the country since mid-June. The floods have displaced millions and destroyed crops, half a million homes and thousands of kilometres (miles) of roads. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flood gardens to combat drought and biodiversity loss, says Natural England

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

The Guardian

This year has seen one of the driest summers on record, with most of the country still officially in drought. Millions of people in England are under hosepipe bans because of water shortages, and reservoir and river levels remain low. The solution to this? People should flood their gardens and create bogs in order to stop the effects of drought and reverse biodiversity loss, according to the head of Natural England. Click here to continue reading

Fiona’s trajectory, power and precipitation — illustrated in graphics

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

CBC News

Hundreds of thousands of people in the Maritimes remained without power Sunday following post-tropical storm Fiona, which brought fierce gusts of wind, heavy rain and serious infrastructure damage across Atlantic Canada. After surging north from the Caribbean, Fiona came ashore before dawn Saturday as a post-tropical cyclone, battering Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, New Brunswick and Quebec with hurricane-strength winds, heavy rains and huge waves. Click here to continue reading

Sudden die-off of endangered sturgeon alarms Canadian biologists

PUBLISHED: 27 September 2022

The Guardian

When the first spindly, armour-clad carcass was spotted in the fast-flowing Nechako River in early September, Nikolaus Gantner and two colleagues scrambled out on a jet boat, braving strong currents to investigate the grim discovery. Days later, the remains of 10 others were spotted floating along a 100km stretch of the river in western Canada. Click here to continue reading

Warming waters challenge Atlantic salmon — wild and farmed

PUBLISHED: 26 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Whether roaming wild or enclosed in floating feedlots on the ocean, Atlantic salmon are cold-water fishes. But as the climate crisis warms the world’s oceans and waterways, cold water is becoming harder to find, which means these long-endangered fish are facing perhaps their biggest challenge yet. Click here to continue reading

A closer look at Canada’s water operator shortage

PUBLISHED: 26 September 2022

Water Canada

It’s been a scant few decades since James Trimble hauled water by bucket from the one-inch-diameter above-ground steel pipe lining the streets of Aklavik in the Northwest Territories. The hamlet, one of Canada’s most northernmost communities, is surrounded by water. The Arctic Ocean offers an endless vista to the north and west, the Mackenzie River skirts the east and south, and smaller creeks and streams abound. Yet, stunningly, Aklavik lacked indoor plumbing as recently as the late 1970s and early 1980s. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Three rivers across the globe are under threat

PUBLISHED: 26 September 2022

NBC News

From powering towns with electricity to supplying people with food and water, rivers are the lifelines of modern civilization. But relentless heat waves and drought have caused the vital waterways to dry up. A global special report on the water emergency affecting billions around the world. NBC Correspondents Steve Patterson, Matt Bradley, and Janis Mackey Frayer are at the Colorado River, the Rhine River in Germany, and the Yangtze River in China to see the effect of climate change on three rivers critical to their regions. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Tonga’s undersea eruption shook the world. But what did it do to our climate?

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer 

When an undersea volcano erupted in Tonga in January, its watery blast was huge and unusual — and scientists are still trying to understand its impacts. The volcano, known as Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai, shot millions of tons of water vapour high up into the atmosphere, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science. Click here to continue reading

Trilliant implements smart water metering solution in Canada

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

Water Canada

Trilliant, a leading international provider of solutions for advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), smart grid, smart cities and IIOT, announced the successful implementation of a wireless water metering solution in Canada, confirming its position to support challenging metering projects where strong, reliable connectivity is required. Provident, an energy services and submetering company in the Greater Toronto Area specializing in the multi-residential market, selected Trilliant’s Smart Water solution for a project in Toronto that required a basement metering solution for a number of townhomes. Click here to continue reading

Saskatchewan accepting water, wastewater, and green infrastructure project applications

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

Water Canada

Saskatchewan communities and eligible organizations may start submitting funding applications for proposed water, wastewater and other projects under the last intake in the province for the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program (ICIP). Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Spain grants personhood to threatened saltwater lagoon

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Spain granted personhood status Wednesday to what environmentalists call Europe’s largest saltwater lagoon, which has suffered massive die-offs of marine life as it degrades due to coastal development and local farming. The new law came after a citizen-led push to provide better protection for the threatened ecosystem. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Nearly 200 stranded pilot whales die on Tasmanian beach but dozens saved and returned to sea

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

The Guardian

Nearly 200 stranded pilot whales have died on Tasmania’s west coast, but rescuers successfully returned 32 animals to deeper water on Thursday. A pod of about 230 pilot whales became stranded on Wednesday on Ocean Beach, west of Strahan. Some were also stranded on a sand flat inside Macquarie Harbour, south of the town. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Horn of Africa drought puts 3.6m children at risk of dropping out of school

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

The Guardian

More than 3.5 million children are at risk of dropping out of school due to the drought in the Horn of Africa, the United Nations has said, amid warnings the crisis could lead to “a lost generation” that misses out on education. According to new figures shared with the Guardian, Unicef now estimates that 3.6 million children in Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia are in danger of leaving school as a result of the cumulative pressure on households caused by the unrelenting drought. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Snow is melting away in the West thanks to wildfires

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Wildfires can affect snow in numerous ways. Trees usually intercept some snow, but when they lose foliage or die, more snow initially reaches the ground. Sometimes, this leads to deeper snow. But then other competing factors take hold. A more exposed snowpack absorbs more solar radiation. Soot and other burned materials fall on the snow, reducing its ability to reflect sunlight back and also encouraging a faster melt. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Profiting from poison: how the US lead industry knowingly created a water crisis

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

The Guardian

The year was 1933 and, to a group of industrialists gathered in a New York City lunch club, it seemed like the lead industry was doomed. The women’s pages of newspapers were filled with stories about children being poisoned by the metal, which had been identified as dangerous as early as the mid-1800s. And cities around America had started banning the use of lead pipes for drinking water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Ranchers’ rebellion: the Californians breaking water rules in a punishing drought

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

The Guardian

Before Rick Lemos and the other directors of the Shasta River Water Association broke the law, they made a decision that under most circumstances might be considered unusual: they sent a letter to authorities spelling out exactly what they intended to do. The California regulation they would defy was an emergency order in response to the state’s punishing drought, in effect forbidding ranchers and farmers in this stretch of land near the Oregon border from diverting water from the Shasta River as they had done for more than a century. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Puerto Ricans desperate for water after Hurricane Fiona’s rampage

PUBLISHED: 24 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

More than a half million people in Puerto Rico remained without water service three days after Hurricane Fiona slammed into the U.S. territory, and many spent hours in lines Wednesday to fill jugs from water trucks while others scooped water from mountain runoff. Sweat rolled down the faces of people in a long line of cars in the northern mountain town of Caguas, where the government had sent a water truck, one of at least 18 so-called “oases” set up across the island. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Heavy rain forecast for Australia’s east coast as third La Niña brings fears of renewed flooding

PUBLISHED: 21 September 2022

The Guardian

Parts of Australia’s east coast could be hit by ongoing flooding within days, just a week after the official declaration of a rare third La Niña. A low-pressure system is forecast to cause widespread rain and storms across much of the inland south-east from Wednesday and possible major flooding from already full waterways across southern Queensland, inland New South Wales and northern Victoria. Click here to continue reading

New solar farm opens to power Edmonton water treatment plant

PUBLISHED: 21 September 2022

CTV News

EPCOR officially opened the kīsikāw pīsim solar farm on Tuesday. The farm will generate up to half of the energy required to power the E. L. Smith Water Treatment plant, which supplies 65 per cent of the water used by Edmonton and surrounding communities. The farm contains 30,350 solar panels, and will generate enough power to cut 14,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions every year, EPCOR said. kīsikāw pīsim (KEY-see-gaw PEE-sim) means “daylight sun” and and is represented in Cree syllabics as ᑮᓯᑳᐤ ᐲᓯᒼ . Click here to continue reading

Atlantic Canada watching Fiona as it strengthens into Category 4 hurricane off Caribbean

PUBLISHED: 21 September 2022

CBC News

Hurricane Fiona continues to be a storm to watch in Atlantic Canada over the next few days. On Wednesday morning, it was a Category 4 hurricane off the eastern Caribbean. The hurricane is set to travel northward and into Maritime waters late Friday and Saturday as it transitions from a Category 3 hurricane on Friday to a post-tropical storm as it approaches land. It’s important to remember that a transition to post-tropical does not mean it will be a weaker storm, but that the storm will change its structure, grow in size and actually cover a larger area. Click here to continue reading

Foresight Canada and Water Alliance enter international partnership to accelerate Canadian and Dutch water tech innovation

PUBLISHED: 21 September 2022

Water Canada

Foresight, Canada’s cleantech accelerator, is proud to announce a historic international partnership with Water Alliance, an established global cluster located in Leeuwarden, Netherlands. Their new partnership will stimulate the growth of both the Canadian and Dutch water innovation ecosystems. Water Alliance is focused on enabling innovative and sustainable water technology that can be used worldwide, and has effectively brought together a complete chain of innovation for water technology, solidifying the Netherlands as the European Water Technology Hub. Click here to continue reading

Okanagan water efforts celebrated

PUBLISHED: 20 September 2022

Water Canada

As summer winds down, so too does the Okanagan’s Make Water Work campaign, with a celebration of those who worked to conserve and help tackle the second largest use of water in the valley, residential outdoor use. “Make Water Work” is led by the Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB)’s Okanagan WaterWise program, and delivered in partnership with local government and water utilities throughout the valley. Conservation efforts were recognized last week with the awarding of the “Make Water Work Community Champion” title to the City of Armstrong, for collecting the most pledges per capita to conserve water, and the awarding this week of two $500 WaterWise yard upgrades, one to pledgee Randy Goncalves of Kelowna, and one to Don Brain who pledged in Osoyoos. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Hurricane Fiona slams Dominican Republic after leaving Puerto Rico with ‘catastrophic’ damage

PUBLISHED: 20 September 2022

CBC News

Hurricane Fiona roared over the Dominican Republic on Monday, a day after knocking out power to all of Puerto Rico and causing damage the governor described as “catastrophic.” Many people were also left without water service. The blow from Fiona was made more devastating because Puerto Rico has yet to recover from Hurricane Maria, which killed nearly 3,000 people and destroyed the power grid in 2017. Five years later, more than 3,000 homes on the island still have blue tarps for roofs. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Nigeria battling floods ‘beyond control’ as warning given of dams overflowing

PUBLISHED: 20 September 2022

The Guardian

Nigeria is battling its worst floods in a decade with more than 300 people killed in 2022 including at least 20 this week, as authorities said the situation is “beyond our control.” The floods in 27 of Nigeria’s 36 states and capital city have affected half a million people, including 100,000 displaced and more than 500 injured, Nigeria’s National Emergency Management Agency said. The disaster has also destroyed thousands of hectares of farmland, worsening fears of a disruption of food supply in Africa’s most populous country. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Europe may have to live with the fact its great rivers are drying up

PUBLISHED: 20 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Along the fabled Danube River, which snakes its way for 1,800 miles from the Black Forest in Germany to the Black Sea in Romania, scores of towns — such as the small Romanian port of Zimnicea on the Bulgarian border — depend on the waterway for their livelihood. But this summer’s epic drought and historic high temperatures, now in a fifth grueling month, have depleted the once-mighty Danube, upending everything that Zimnicea’s residents — port workers, farmers, the shipping industry, anglers, restaurant owners and families — had for generations counted on to sustain themselves. Click here to continue reading

Bison on this Prairie farm bring back birds, biodiversity and fewer floods

PUBLISHED: 20 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

When a powerful drought fried the fields on Doug Griller’s farm last summer, the Manitoba rancher feared they would have trouble bouncing back. A herd of bison helped the recovery exceed expectations. In 1993, Griller made an unusual move: He started letting his grain fields grow over with grass, sold his cattle, bolstered his fences and bought a herd of bison. Despite being native to the Prairies — before they were nearly eradicated by Europeans — few farmers raised the hulking ruminants at the time, but to Griller, they “just kind of made sense.” Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘This is what a river should look like’: Dutch rewilding project turns back the clock 500 years

PUBLISHED: 20 September 2022

The Guardian

Construction work has already been completed along 50km of the Meuse River floodplain as part of the Border Meuse project to undo 500 years of world-renowned Dutch water engineering. Big infrastructure is at the heart of the Dutch “offensive” – as opposed to “defensive” – approach to sorting out rivers, which involves relandscaping entire catchments, rather than rewetting specific at-risk areas. This approach is particularly revolutionary given that the seed for this project was planted decades ago. By contrast, the UK has only started thinking about implementing natural solutions at scale in the past few years. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flooding ravages Italy, killing 10 and leaving others stranded in trees

PUBLISHED: 19 September 2022

CBC News

Flash floods swept through several towns Friday in hilly central Italy after hours of exceptionally heavy rain, leaving 10 people dead and at least four missing. Dozens of survivors scrambled onto rooftops or up into trees to await rescue. Floods invaded garages and basements and knocked down doors. In one town, the powerful rush of water pushed a car onto a second-story balcony, while elsewhere parked vehicles were crumpled on top of each other in the streets. Some farm fields near the sea were meters under water. Click here to continue reading

Sudbury, Ont., diver finds jellyfish in city’s Ramsey Lake

PUBLISHED: 19 September 2022

CBC News

A video shot by a Sudbury, Ont., diving instructor went viral after he recorded small jellyfish in Ramsey Lake, at the centre of the city. Jason Fox has done hundreds of dives in the lake, over a 10-year period, and had never seen jellyfish, until recently. Just over a week later, on Sunday, Sept. 4, another diving instructor was out with a group of students and spotted about eight jellyfish in the lake. Click here to continue reading

In wake of catastrophic flooding, Alberta lends helping hand to Pakistan

PUBLISHED: 19 September 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Alberta is lending a helping hand after floods have devastated Pakistan. According to a press release, the Government of Alberta has joined efforts with the Canadian Red Cross to help those impacted by the floods. The government will match dollar for dollar every donation Albertans and Alberta organizations make to the Canadian Red Cross, up to a maximum $500,000. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Puerto Rico hit by blackout as Hurricane Fiona makes landfall

PUBLISHED: 19 September 2022

CBC News

The entire island of Puerto Rico was without power on Sunday as Hurricane Fiona made landfall and threatened to cause “catastrophic flooding” and landslides before barreling toward the Dominican Republic, a government agency said. The centre of the storm made landfall on the southwestern coast of Puerto Rico near Punta Tocon at 3:20 p.m. ET with maximum sustained winds of about 85 miles per hour 140 km/h, clearing the threshold for a Category 1 hurricane, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flood waters receding after storm batters western Alaska

PUBLISHED: 19 September 2022

Ponoka News

Floodwaters were starting to recede in some parts of western Alaska that were battered by the worst storm in a half century, leaving debris flung by the powerful Bering Sea waves on beaches and in seaside communities. The storm, the remnant of Typhoon Merbok, was weakening Sunday as it moved north from the Bering Strait into the Chukchi Sea off Alaska’s northwest coast. Click here to continue reading

‘A huge achievement’: Vision for vast network of West Coast marine protected areas unveiled at last

PUBLISHED: 19 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The blueprint for a vast network of marine protected areas across the northern third of Canada’s West Coast is being unveiled after more than a decade of work. A group of 17 coastal First Nations and the Canadian and B.C. governments have crafted a draft action plan for the BC Northern Shelf MPA Network — covering 100,000-square-kilometres of ocean — and released it for public input Thursday. Click here to continue reading

A natural approach sanitary system overflow reduction is right under our feet

PUBLISHED: 19 September 2022

Water Canada

Whether it’s hard rain and flash flooding or downhole blockages that become suppressive, sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) are all too common nowadays. Overflow events occur when sewer entrances and exits are both submerged, and the supply of water is greater than the total capacity of the pipes. With nowhere to go, wastewater is forced one of two ways: backwards to the point of origin or out into the environment. Neither situation is desirable, and both have serious environmental ramifications. As these problems grow more prevalent, municipalities are exploring new ways to address them. Click here to continue reading

Abbotsford builds back stronger with new drinking water system

PUBLISHED: 16 September 2022

Water Canada

The Province is providing $62 million to the City of Abbotsford to build a new well and water-treatment system to ensure a reliable, resilient water service for more than 165,000 people in response to growing climate-related threats. Upgrades and additions to the Abbotsford drinking water system will mean water reliability and safety for Abbotsford, Mission and the Matsqui First Nation, as well as homes, a regional cancer facility, senior care homes, farms and agricultural processing. Click here to continue reading

Alberta glaciologist climbed and camped atop Mount Logan to unlock climate history

PUBLISHED: 16 September 2022

Global News

Last June, Alison Criscitiello led a team of seven up the second-highest peak in North America in search of ancient ice and to potentially unlock tens of thousands of years of climate history. Criscitiello, director of the Canadian Ice Core Lab (CICL) at the University of Alberta, has stood at the top of Canada’s highest mountain a couple of times before. She describes it as “technically non-technical” since climbers don’t have to set fixed lines to get up the entire route. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Deadly flood-water ‘tsunami’ sweeps through Italian towns

PUBLISHED: 16 September 2022

The Guardian

At least nine people have died and four are missing after dramatic storms provoked severe flooding in Italy’s central Marche region, forcing politicians to finally raise the topic of the climate crisis a week before general elections. Heavy rain began to lash the region on Thursday afternoon, with streets turning into rivers and 420mm of rain falling in the worst-hit town, Cantiano, within a few hours, half the amount that fell on the town throughout the whole of 2021, Corriere della Sera reported. Click here to continue reading

Regina’s water meter upgrade project begins

PUBLISHED: 16 September 2022

Water Canada

The City of Regina will soon begin installing new water meters throughout the city in a major upgrade project. The new system will collect faster, near real-time information about water consumption which enables customers to manage and conserve water use, as well as help detect water leaks. The new technology promotes environmental sustainability by eliminating the need for the meter reading vehicles that are currently used to collect drive-by meter reads. This will result in a reduction of approximately 10 tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per year. Click here to continue reading

Wheat production in Alberta may leap 80% this year, and it’s not the only crop on the rebound

PUBLISHED: 16 September 2022

CBC News

Canadian farmers are on track to produce a better crop this year, even as the memory of a punishing drought last year remains fresh in the Prairie provinces. Early estimates from Statistics Canada suggest crop yields will be higher this harvest because of better growing conditions in Western Canada. The agency said Wednesday it expects higher production levels for many crops, including canola, barley, soybeans and corn. Click here to continue reading

City of Red Deer monitors groundwater effects at Gaetz Lake Sanctuary

PUBLISHED: 15 September 2022

Red Deer Advocate

The City of Red Deer is ensuring old landfill sites are not impacting the environment. Monitoring was conducted near Gaetz Lake Sanctuary recently to test for any possible landfill leaching, says Tracy Seppala, waste management technical specialist. The city is expecting an environmental report this fall. Click here to continue reading

After fall flooding, Abbotsford banks on new $84.4M water system to help it weather climate storm

PUBLISHED: 15 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The City of Abbotsford is getting funding help from the B.C. government to bolster its drinking water system against floods, wildfires and other climate-related disasters. Municipal Affairs Minister Nathan Cullen said Wednesday that the $62 million in government funds will support a new well and water-treatment system to serve more than 165,000 people in Abbotsford, Mission and the Matsqui First Nation. The vulnerability of the system was made clear in November 2021 when flooding from torrential rainfall forced 85 per cent of the water supply system off-line, he said. Click here to continue reading

Winning the bacteria battle in wastewater treatment

PUBLISHED: 15 September 2022

Water Canada

The problem today is as wastewater facilities age, capacity and quality problems arise, the first instinct or practice is to immediately start planning for a CAPEX upgrade or expansion, however, many municipalities will simply not have the financial means to execute the strategy and will face compliance and capacity issues which can results in fines. However, there are other options. All wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) require upkeep and reinvestment to maintain efficacy and efficiency, and these improvements involving infrastructure and equipment investments frequently require substantial capital expenditure (CAPEX), innovative, cost-effective microbiological technology can reduce or eliminate CAPEX demands in many cases and enhance the quality of output, and radically improve plant performance. Click here to continue reading

Rail strike threatens water and energy supplies, prompting White House planning

PUBLISHED: 15 September 2022

Boston Globe

A national railroad strike could derail critical deliveries of chlorine to wastewater treatment plants and coal to utility plants, among other potentially crippling disruptions, prompting senior White House aides Tuesday to review contingency options for protecting the nation’s drinking water and energy supply. White House aides are looking at how to ensure essential products carried by rail — such as food, energy, and key health products — could still reach their final destination even in the event of a potential strike. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pakistan scrambles to deliver aid, braces for more monsoon rains as flood death toll rises

PUBLISHED: 14 September 2022

CBC News

Pakistan scrambled to deliver aid to those most in need on Tuesday as the death toll from record-breaking floods in this impoverished Islamic nation rose further, with no respite in sight from the unprecedented monsoon rains. The rains started early this year — in mid-June — and swept away entire villages, bridges, and roads, leaving hundreds of thousands homeless. At one point, a third of the country’s territory was inundated with water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: It’s about dam time beavers get the respect they deserve

PUBLISHED: 14 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer 

It’s been a good month for beavers. On Sept. 6, the New York Times ran an article highlighting the rodents’ position as “highly skilled environmental engineers” capable of mitigating threats like wildfires and drought. The same day, the San Francisco Chronicle dubbed beavers “one of California’s best chances to fight climate change.” Click here to continue reading

Manitoba Government announces significant support through Spring Flood Disaster Financial Assistance Program

PUBLISHED: 14 September 2022

Water Canada

Manitoba experienced unprecedented flooding in spring because of high winter snowpack and storms throughout April, May, June and July that brought a mix of snow, freezing rain, and rain that created high river and lake levels and substantial overland flooding. Private residences, farms, small businesses, non-profit organizations, and provincial and municipal infrastructure were impacted. Click here to continue reading

New rules from fish farm certifier keep up status quo, harm wild salmon, environmental coalition says

PUBLISHED: 13 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

When a piece of fish at your local grocery store has a sticker from the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC), it’s meant to certify a high-quality catch. But conservation groups that have long cautioned against the legitimacy of seafood labelling say the organization’s standards are further weakened by changes to its rules on sea lice for farmed fish and other aquaculture products. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Water firms consider bans on filling public pools and car washing to fight drought

PUBLISHED: 13 September 2022

The Guardian

Bans on filling public swimming pools, maintaining ponds, washing cars and cleaning offices and shops could be put in place as England continues to run out of water, the Guardian can reveal. Despite recent showery periods, the country, particularly in the south and east, has not received enough rain to refill depleted rivers and reservoirs. Leaked documents from the National Drought Group, seen by the Guardian, say that non-essential use bans are being considered by some water companies. Click here to continue reading

Blue-green algae bloom advisory issued for Pigeon Lake

PUBLISHED: 13 September 2022

Sylvan Lake News

Alberta Health Services has identified a blue-green algae bloom in areas of Pigeon Lake. Residents living near the shores of the lake and visitors are advised to avoid all contact with the blue-green algae blooms. If contact occurs AHS states to wash with tap water as soon as possible. Where the blue-green algae is visible do not swim or wade or allow pets to swim and wade in the water and avoid feeding whole fish or trimmings from the lake to pets. AHS also advises to consider limiting human consumption of whole fish and fish trimmings from Pigeon Lake at this time, however, it is still safe to consume fish fillets. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Running water returns in Mississippi capital – but it’s still undrinkable

PUBLISHED: 12 September 2022

The Guardian

Residents in Jackson, the majority-Black capital city of Mississippi, now have water coming out of their taps once again, but are still having to boil it before drinking, as they have had to intermittently for years. It is a step forward from the situation last week, when floods overwhelmed the city’s dilapidated main water treatment plant and essentially interrupted water supply across the entire city, affecting more than 160,000 residents. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Water is our most precious resource’: alfalfa farmers asked to give up crop amid megadrought in US south-west

PUBLISHED: 12 September 2022

The Guardian

The large-scale production of alfalfa during a megadrought is, in large part, possible because the Imperial Valley is the single biggest controller of rights to Colorado River water. Now, with the basin on the brink of the most severe water cuts in history, the alfalfa industry has been propelled to the center of longstanding debates over sustainable water use and the future of farming in the west. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Fears drought and high gas prices could cause UK food shortages this winter

PUBLISHED: 12 September 2022

The Guardian

There is a risk of food shortages in the UK this winter, experts have said, as the drought and high gas prices put pressure on farmers. While growers who use glasshouses are either not sowing or waiting until spring when there are more daylight hours, the crops that would usually have sustained the country during fallow periods, such as cabbages, carrots and potatoes, are likely to have reduced yields because of the drought. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flood-hit Pakistan facing food shortages, PM says

PUBLISHED: 12 September 2022

CBC News

Pakistan is grappling with food shortages after deadly floods left the impoverished country’s agriculture belt under water, the prime minister told the Turkish president by phone, as authorities scaled up efforts on Monday to deliver food, tents and other items. More than 660,000 people are living in relief camps and makeshift homes after floods damaged their homes across the country. Pakistan, the country’s military, United Nations agencies and local charities are providing food to these flood victims. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Rain takes grain, crops on 2 million acres in Pakistan

PUBLISHED: 09 September 2022

The Western Producer

Southern Pakistan braced for yet more flooding on Thursday as a surge of water flowed down the Indus River, threatening further devastation in a country already a third inundated, in a growing disaster blamed on climate change. Record monsoon rains and melting glaciers in northern mountains have triggered floods that have killed at least 1,208 people, including 416 children, according to the National Disaster Management Authority. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: California’s nightmare: drought, record heat, fires and now maybe floods

PUBLISHED: 09 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Californians sweated it out amid a record-breaking heat wave entering its 10th day Friday that has helped fuel deadly wildfires and pushed energy supplies to the brink of daily power outages. Relief is in sight as the remnants of a hurricane approach that will lower temperatures during the weekend but could bring another set of challenges: heavy rains that will be welcomed in the drought-plagued state but might cause flash floods. Click here to continue reading

Energy regulator rations water supply for oil, gas companies in northeast B.C. amid drought

PUBLISHED: 09 September 2022

CBC News

British Columbia’s energy regulator is rationing the water supply for some oil and gas companies because of drought in the northeastern part of the province. On Thursday, the B.C. Oil and Gas Commission (BCOGC) suspended 20 water permits for 12 energy companies that draw water from rivers, streams and lakes in the Peace River and Liard River watersheds, in the Fort St. John and Fort Nelson areas. Click here to continue reading

Sea lion leaps onto boaters in bid to escape killer whales near Victoria

PUBLISHED: 08 September 2022

CTV News

A pair of boaters near Victoria escaped serious injury Monday when a large sea lion leapt onto their small craft in a bid to flee a trio of killer whales. The dramatic encounter was filmed from a whale-watching vessel that had been following the transient, or Bigg’s, orcas near Pedder Bay, west of Victoria. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: US lobster put on ‘red list’ to protect endangered North Atlantic right whales

PUBLISHED: 08 September 2022

The Guardian

Lobster nets and pots have become such a threat to the survival of critically endangered North Atlantic right whales that the crustaceans have been “red-listed” as seafood to avoid by a major fish sustainability guide. Fewer than 340 of these whales exist today, including only 80 breeding females. The population is estimated to have dwindled by 28% over the past decade. Click here to continue reading

Boil water advisory issued in Bow Island, Alta.

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

Global News

Officials with the Town of Bow Island told residents of the southeastern Alberta municipality on Tuesday that repairs are underway after a “water break” near the water treatment plant’s main line caused a disruption to water service in the area. In an emergency alert issued Tuesday afternoon, officials said “water will be turned back on, however, water may be unsafe to drink or use.” Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: China reports ‘most severe’ heatwave and third driest summer on record

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

The Guardian

China recorded its highest temperatures and one of its lowest levels of rainfall in 61 years during a two-month summer heatwave that caused forest fires, damaged crops and hit power supplies, the national meteorological agency said. The average national temperature in August, 22.4C, was 1.2C higher than the seasonal norm, while average rainfall fell 23% to 82mm, the third lowest since records began in 1961. Click here to continue reading

After 50 years, westslope cutthroat trout return to lake in Banff National Park

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

CBC News

For the first time in 50 years, westslope cutthroat trout are swimming in Hidden Lake again — a feat of conservation that Parks Canada experts have worked on for more than a decade to achieve. Nestled high up in the Skoki Valley of Banff National park, specialists laboured through trial and error to restore habitat ideal for Alberta’s native, and at-risk, westslope cutthroat trout. This summer, thousands of fishlings strong enough to survive in the wild are swimming free in the lake again. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pakistan appeals for ‘immense’ international response to floods

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

The Guardian

Pakistan has appealed to the international community for an “immense humanitarian response” to unprecedented flooding that has left at least 1,265 people dead. According to initial government estimates, the rain and flooding have caused $10bn in damage. Multiple officials and experts have blamed the unusual monsoon rains and flooding on climate change, including UN Secretary-General António Guterres, who called on the world to stop “sleepwalking” through the deadly crisis. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Jackson mayor: residents face ‘longer road ahead’ before safe water is restored

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

The Guardian

The mayor of Jackson, Mississippi, where 150,000 people are still without safe drinking water after an infrastructure failure, said on Sunday residents face a “much longer road ahead” before services are fully restored in the majority Black city. Speaking to ABC’s This Week, Chokwe Antar Lumumba said there had been improvements, with water pressure restored to a majority of residents. Click here to continue reading

Finding a solution for Canada’s growing urban flooding problem

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

Water Canada

One of the most tangible and costly effects of global climate change is major, often catastrophic, floods. In Canada, where upwards of seven million people live in either a coastal or riverine flood plain, it’s clear that the impact of climate change-driven massive precipitation events, spring freshets, and rising lake levels have been taking an increasingly heavy toll on Canadian communities in recent years. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pakistan’s biggest lake may burst banks after draining attempts fail

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

The Guardian

Pakistan’s biggest lake is on the verge of bursting its banks after attempts by authorities to drain it in a controlled way failed, a senior local official has warned. In a last-ditch effort to avoid a catastrophe, officials breached Lake Manchar on Sunday, a move they acknowledged could displace up to 100,000 people from their homes but would also save densely populated areas from floods. Click here to continue reading

Worried about their water supply, Quebec towns want industry to pay up

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

CBC News

Quebec has three per cent of the world’s fresh water, but municipalities west of the island of Montreal are increasingly concerned about their supply. Officials want the next government to force industries to pay more for the water they use. Once a week, municipal workers in the town of Saint-Lazare, west of Montreal, adjust the arrow on signs indicating the level of water consumption. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: India’s tech hub, Bengaluru flooded after days of torrential rain

PUBLISHED: 07 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Life for many in the southern Indian city of Bengaluru was disrupted on Tuesday after two days of torrential rains set off long traffic snarls, widespread power cuts and heavy floods that swept into homes and submerged roads. With several parts of the city still heavily waterlogged, videos on social media showed people hopping onto tractors to get to work. Many schools were shut on Monday over the heavy downpours and authorities have warned of interruptions to the water supply. Boats were deployed to rescue people submerged in floodwaters. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘All of a sudden it’s undrinkable’: why an entire US city has no clean water

PUBLISHED: 02 September 2022

The Guardian

The overwhelming majority of people – more than 150,000 – in the predominantly Black city have now lost access to safe running water. Most had already been without drinkable water for more than a month, but flooding last weekend, caused by weeks of rain, further interrupted operations at the city’s beleaguered main water plant. Currently large numbers have nothing come out of their taps, and for those that do, it must be boiled before being consumed. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: River pollution goes unchecked as testing in England falls to 10-year low

PUBLISHED: 02 September 2022

The Guardian

Testing of rivers in England has fallen dramatically in the past 10 years, with experts warning it leaves a vacuum of knowledge about the effects of pollution. Environment Agency data shows its river testing has fallen from nearly 100,000 samples a year in 2012 to 41,519 in 2021 – the lowest level of sampling in 20 years apart from the drop-off during Covid in 2020. Click here to continue reading

There must be a better way to scare off seals

PUBLISHED: 02 September 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Each summer at the Ballard Locks near Seattle, Wash., thousands of tourists gather to watch steelhead trout and coho, sockeye and chinook salmon valiantly leap up the fish ladder as they head from Puget Sound to Lake Washington and the spawning grounds beyond. So, too, do a handful of hungry seals and sea lions. For decades, pinnipeds have been congregating at the Ballard Locks to gorge themselves on fish populations already stressed by pollution, habitat loss, and overfishing. To protect the fish, conservation managers have been trying a variety of methods to shoo them away. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pakistan’s ‘monsoons on steroids’ show world that extreme weather is never far away

PUBLISHED: 02 September 2022

Global News

In Pakistan, a flooding crisis of unimaginable proportions is unfolding in real time. The water came so fast and with such ferocity that entire communities have been engulfed by water. Helicopters are still racing to pluck stranded residents to safety. Others were hoisted from their homes using makeshift pulley systems and bedframes. Click here to continue reading

UWaterloo leads interdisciplinary team investigating PFAS in Canadian water systems

PUBLISHED: 02 September 2022

Water Canada

University of Waterloo is leading an interdisciplinary team to identify and treat per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) – better known as forever chemicals – in water systems affecting more than 2.5 million Canadians. PFAS, are a new class of more than 4,000 environmental contaminants whose impact on human health is unknown. PFAS are used in a wide range of products such as cosmetics, textiles, fire-fighting foams and food packaging materials. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: California Installing Huge Solar Panels Over Canals to Combat Drought

PUBLISHED: 01 September 2022

Futurism

California is spending $20 million on a pilot project that will install more than a mile of solar panels over sections of important water sources, including canals — a futuristic effort to fight a devastating drought hitting California this summer with green technology. The idea is simple. The massive panels, to be installed over the Turlock Irrigation District (TID) in central California by the end of next year, are intended to stop dwindling water reserves from evaporating too quickly and forming vegetative growth — while simultaneously providing renewable energy for the local grid. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flood-stricken Pakistan dealing with waterborne diseases, food shortages

PUBLISHED: 01 September 2022

CBC News

Officials in Pakistan raised concern Wednesday over the spread of waterborne diseases among thousands of flood victims, as waters from powerful monsoon rains began to recede in many parts of the country. Some doctors said initially they were seeing mostly patients traumatized by the flooding, but are now treating people suffering from diarrhea, skin infections and other waterborne ailments in the country’s flood-hit areas. Click here to continue reading

Project funding to address flood risk, support innovation for Nova Scotia

PUBLISHED: 01 September 2022

Water Canada

Five municipal projects will receive provincial funding to help mitigate flood risk or support municipal innovation. Four projects under the Flood Risk Infrastructure Investment Program will receive $258,421, and one project under the Municipal Innovation Program will receive $262,500. The Municipal Innovation Program provides funding for regional co-operation projects to help the long-term sustainability of local governments. Municipalities can apply for program funding to support innovative approaches to regional collaboration. Click here to continue reading

Blue-green algae advisory issued for Hastings Lake east of Edmonton

PUBLISHED: 01 September 2022

CTV News

Alberta Health Services has issued a blue-green algae advisory for Hastings Lake. Residents and visitors are advised to avoid all contact with blue-green algae blooms, not to swim or wade or allow pets to swim or wade in affected areas, and not to feed whole fish or trimmings from the lake to pets. Humans should also consider limiting consumption of whole fish or fish trimmings from the lake, but eating fish fillets is safe. Click here to continue reading

Alberta regulator rejects feedlot application near Pigeon Lake

PUBLISHED: 01 September 2022

CBC News

An Alberta regulatory body has turned down an application to expand a feedlot near a popular recreational lake, saying the location wasn’t appropriate and would damage the local community. In a decision released Wednesday, the Natural Resources Conservation Board denied a plan from G&S Cattle to build a 4,000-head feedlot near the shores of Pigeon Lake, south of Edmonton. Click here to continue reading

The Yukon and Northwest Territories sign Bilateral Water Management agreements

PUBLISHED: 01 September 2022

Water Canada

The governments of Yukon and the Northwest Territories have signed two Bilateral Water Management agreements. The agreements apply to the Peel and Liard River sub-basins, both of which are in the Mackenzie River Basin, and will help better manage and sustain the aquatic ecosystem health in these two key watersheds. Click here to continue reading

Government of Canada releases report that will advance work on Canada’s first national flood insurance program

PUBLISHED: 01 September 2022

Water Canada

Communities and governments are working together to prepare for and adapt to impacts of climate change, helping to improve quality of life for Canadians in higher-risk areas, and reduce the costs of disasters. In Canada, flooding is the most common and costly natural disaster, causing approximately $1.5 billion in damage to households, property, and infrastructure annually, with residential property owners bearing approximately 75% of uninsured losses each year. Click here to continue reading

Blue-green algae takes over many Alberta lakes as hot weather returns this week: ‘It smells like sewage’

PUBLISHED: 31 August 2022

Global News

With another hot week in store for much of Alberta, many people are getting out to try to soak up and enjoy the remaining days of summer. With that, many will flock to nearby lakes to spend time at the beach. But several of Alberta’s lakes have been taken over by blue-green algae this summer, including Garner Lake. There are currently dozens of blue-green algae advisories in place for lakes in Alberta. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Historic monuments resurface as severe drought shrinks Spain’s reservoirs

PUBLISHED: 31 August 2022

The Guardian

A huge megalithic complex and a centuries-old church are among the underwater monuments to have resurfaced in Spain as a severe drought causes water levels to plunge. After a prolonged dry spell, Spain’s reservoirs – which supply water for cities and farms – are at just under 36% capacity, according to environment ministry figures for August. Click here to continue reading

She stripped a river full of this pesky invasive plant — by hand

PUBLISHED: 31 August 2022

CBC News

European water chestnut (EWC for short) clogs shorelines, cutting off sunlight and space for fish and native plants. It’s also a nuisance for humans — difficult to swim or paddle through. Its sharp, spiky seeds can puncture skin and even poke through a thin sandal. The Welland River is one of three known EWC populations in the province. The annual plant is also found around Wolfe Island, near Kingston, and at Voyageur Provincial Park on the Ottawa River, according to the Invasive Species Centre, based in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. Click here to continue reading

Research: Vulnerable communities face a higher risk of socio-economic injustice due to flood hazards

PUBLISHED: 31 August 2022

Water Canada

Socially vulnerable groups are at greater risk from climate-change-caused flooding because of systemic disadvantages, according to a new study. The study also reveals that neighbourhood-level racial or ethnic, economic, social, and demographic factors play a significant explanatory role in the distribution of flood risk across Canadian neighbourhoods. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: No running water in parts of Mississippi capital as flooding hits treatment plant

PUBLISHED: 31 August 2022

The Guardian

The governor of Mississippi declared a state of emergency and called in the national guard after the main water treatment facility in the state capital, Jackson, started to fail, threatening the water supply of up to 250,000 people and leaving many without running water. The announcement made official what thousands of the city’s 160,000 residents already knew – that water pressure is so low it is impossible to carry out vital daily functions such as flushing toilets or taking showers. Click here to continue reading

Canadian student wins Stockholm Junior Water Prize for research on prevention and treatment of harmful algae blooms

PUBLISHED: 31 August 2022

World Water Week 2022

As always, the spirit was high during yesterday’s emotional Stockholm Junior Water Prize ceremony as Annabelle M. Rayson from Canada was awarded the grand prize for her research on how to treat and prevent harmful algae blooms. Harmful algae blooms plague aquatic ecosystems around the world. They impact water quality and ecosystem diversity, cause dead zones, and cost the fishing and tourism industries millions of dollars. Click here to continue reading

City of Red Deer still seeking information from residents affected by June rainfall

PUBLISHED: 30 August 2022

Red Deer Advocate

The City of Red Deer has heard from 220 property owners citing damages due to ground flooding following excessive rainfall on June 23. But more residents are being encouraged to come forward by Sept. 14, the city said in a statement Monday morning. In July, the city submitted an application to the Government of Alberta’s Disaster Recovery Program seeking financial relief for residents and property owners who experienced flooding due to excessive rainfall in June. Click here to continue reading

After the 2021 drought, things are looking up for Alberta crop farmers

PUBLISHED: 30 August 2022

CBC News

After a drought in 2021 and a dry start to 2022, things are finally looking up for Alberta crop farmers, a new report from Statistics Canada suggests. Thanks to better growing conditions in Western Canada, the agency’s latest crop estimates predict farmers will produce significantly more wheat, canola, barley and other crops than they did last year. Click here to continue reading

Advocates worry southeast Calgary development could devastate natural wetlands and habitats

PUBLISHED: 30 August 2022

CBC News

Environmental advocates say a proposed suburban development in southeast Calgary would be built on a environmentally sensitive area. There are concerns construction could mean the destruction of thriving natural wetlands and a riparian area along the Bow River. Ricardo Ranch is a 570-hectare area south of Seton. Its area structure plan was approved by city council in 2019. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Rain eases China’s record heatwave but fresh energy crisis looms

PUBLISHED: 30 August 2022

The Guardian

Rain across central China this week is expected to relieve the country’s worst heatwave on record, but weather agencies are now warning of potential floods, while analysts say the energy crisis exacerbated by the months-long drought is not over. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: All of south-west of England in drought, says Environment Agency

PUBLISHED: 30 August 2022

The Guardian

All of south-west England is in drought after some of the driest conditions in nearly 90 years, the Environment Agency has said. The Wessex area – which includes Bristol, Somerset, Dorset, south Gloucestershire and parts of Wiltshire – has been declared in drought status. The move means 11 of the 14 Environment Agency areas in England are in drought status, with the rest of the south-west – Devon, Cornwall and Isle of Scilly – already designated as being in drought earlier this month. Click here to continue reading

Moncton residents to benefit from upgraded stormwater and wastewater infrastructure

PUBLISHED: 30 August 2022

Water Canada

The City of Moncton will install a dedicated storm sewer relief system to provide sewer separation on three streets in the City’s downtown core. Lutz, Westmorland and Robinson Streets will all be fully reconstructed following the upgrades, and the existing communication and electricity lines will be relocated underground to improve reliability during ice storms. This project will beautify Moncton’s downtown, improve the City’s capacity to manage wastewater and stormwater and increase residents’ access to potable water. Click here to continue reading

‘Suspect there are more’: Parks Canada captures invasive crayfish

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

CTV News

Parks Canada officials are looking into how a northern crayfish, listed as an invasive species in Alberta, found its way into Banff National Park. The invertebrate, which looks like a miniature lobster, does live in ponds and creeks in other areas of the province, but officials were surprised when they were told they could be in the icy waters of Bow Lake. The discovery brought Parks Canada officials to the area in force and, after approximately a week of searching, they found it. Click here to continue reading

Climate change is increasing frequency of fish mass die-offs

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

Science Daily

As the planet’s climate has gotten warmer, so has the prevalence of fish die-offs, or mass mortality events. These die-offs can have severe impacts on the function of ecosystems, imperil existing fish populations and reduce the global food supply. And the frequency of these events appears to be accelerating, with potentially dire consequences for the world if global carbon emissions are not substantially reduced over the 21st century. Click here to continue reading

‘No evidence’ of hydrocarbon spill on Glenmore Reservoir: City of Calgary

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

Global News

Analysis of water from Calgary’s drinking reservoir revealed “no evidence of a spill of oil or hydrocarbon, or any other concerning element” the day after hazardous materials teams attended reports of a hydrocarbon spill in Glenmore Reservoir Thursday afternoon. On Friday, the City of Calgary said the investigation and water sampling analysis showed the water was clean of those elements. Click here to continue reading

River surfing continues to grow in popularity in Alberta with competition, new projects

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

CTV News

Surfing isn’t typically something people associate with Alberta, but one group is trying to change that as popularity of the sport grows. The Alberta River Surfing Association (Alberta RSA) held its annual Mountain Wave Classic on the Kananaskis River in Canoe Meadows on Saturday. The event has been running since 2006 and each year, more surfers come out to put their skills to the test. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Britons need to be ‘less squeamish’ about drinking water from sewage, says agency head

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

The Guardian

British people need to be “less squeamish” about drinking water derived from sewage, the boss of the Environment Agency has said. Writing in the Sunday Times, Sir James Bevan outlined measures the government, water companies and ordinary people should be taking to avoid severe droughts. He said: “Part of the solution will be to reprocess the water that results from sewage treatment and turn it back into drinking water – perfectly safe and healthy, but not something many people fancy.” Click here to continue reading

Blue-green algae bloom advisory issued for Wabamun Lake

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

Edmonton Journal

Alberta Health Services has issued a blue-green algae bloom advisory for Lake Wabamun, west of Edmonton. AHS says those visiting the lake should avoid all contact with algae blooms, including swimming and wading. It also advises against humans or pets eating fish or fish trimmings from the lake. Visitors are also reminded that boiling the lake water will not remove the toxins produced by blue-green algae. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pakistan declares floods a ‘climate catastrophe’ as death toll tops 1,000

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

The Guardian

A Pakistani minister has called the country’s deadly monsoon season “a serious climate catastrophe” and “a climate dystopia at our doorstep” as officials said deaths from widespread flooding in Pakistan had passed 1,000 since mid-June. Flash floods, which have intensified in recent days, have swept away villages, roads, bridges, people, livestock and crops across all four provinces. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pakistan floods: plea for help amid fears monsoon could put a third of country underwater

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

The Guardian

Pakistan’s government has appealed for international help to tackle a flooding emergency that has killed more than 1,000 people and threatens to leave a third of the country – an area roughly the size of Britain – underwater. Foreign minister Bilawal Bhutto-Zardari said on Sunday night that floods brought on by weeks of extreme monsoonal rainfall and melting glaciers would worsen Pakistan’s already dire economic situation and that financial aid was needed. Click here to continue reading 

Trying to tame the tide exacerbates climate crisis

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

According to a new study, impounded wetlands can undergo an important change, shifting from carbon sinks into methane sources. The transformation turns these landscapes from ones that help mitigate climate change into ones that exacerbate it. Click here to continue reading

Canada invests in Georgian Bay Biosphere Reserve

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

Water Canada

The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Julie Dabrusin, attended a turtle release at the Georgian Bay Biosphere Reserve on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, the Honourable Steven Guilbeault. At the event, she announced that the biosphere reserve is receiving more than $585,000 over three years from Canada’s Enhanced Nature Legacy. These funds will support the biosphere reserve’s biodiversity conservation efforts and support Canada’s goal to conserve 25 percent of lands and inland waters by 2025, working toward 30 percent of each by 2030. Click here to continue reading

Orthophosphate to be added to Sturgeon County, AB drinking water

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

Water Canada

EPCOR has informed Sturgeon County that starting in early 2023, they will add orthophosphate to its water treatment process. EPCOR supplies the drinking water to Sturgeon County as part of the Regional Water Customer Group. This will apply to Sturgeon County utility customers and to water at the truck fill stations. Namao Ridge and Grandview Estates are not part of this program as they are on a community well system. Click here to continue reading

Canada’s economy could take $139 billion hit from floods, storms, drought by 2050

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Floods, droughts and major storms that wash out highways, damage buildings and affect power grids could cost Canada’s economy $139 billion over the next 30 years, a new climate−based analysis predicts. The report, titled “Aquanomics,” is being published today by GHD, a global engineering and architecture services firm. GHD’s Canadian water lead Don Holland said there are lots of reports that count up insured losses and physical damage after major events like last fall’s atmospheric river in British Columbia. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Before and after photos show severity of Pakistan flooding

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

CBC News

The unprecedented monsoon season has affected all four of Pakistan’s provinces, triggering flash floods across the country that have affected 33 million Pakistanis, damaged nearly 1 million homes and killed at least 1,061 people. Images taken and released by Maxar Technologies on Sunday show high levels of flooding along the Indus River as well as the cities of Rajanpur and Rojhan in the province of Punjab. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Major sea-level rise caused by melting of Greenland ice cap is ‘now inevitable’

PUBLISHED: 29 August 2022

The Guardian

Major sea-level rise from the melting of the Greenland ice cap is now inevitable, scientists have found, even if the fossil fuel burning that is driving the climate crisis were to end overnight. The research shows the global heating to date will cause an absolute minimum sea-level rise of 27cm (10.6in) from Greenland alone as 110tn tonnes of ice melt. With continued carbon emissions, the melting of other ice caps and thermal expansion of the ocean, a multi-metre sea-level rise appears likely. Click here to continue reading

Drinking water hydrant, a first for Ottawa

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

Water Canada

Ottawa recently launched a pilot project to bring the first hydrant drinking water fountain to Ottawa. This seasonal water fountain was attached to a local hydrant and was tested and cleaned, and is now ready to use by residents, tourists and even their pets! The City of Ottawa’s tap water is something to celebrate. It’s safe, refreshing and accessible right where you need it on-the-go. How cool is that? Hydrant drinking water fountains are a welcomed resource for those in Ottawa who are looking to refill their water bottles or take a nice cold sip of Ottawa’s tap water. Click here to continue reading

Second phase of upgrades for Winnipeg’s North End Sewage Treatment Plant

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

Water Canada

The Honourable Heather Stefanson, Premier of Manitoba; Terry Duguid, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Member of Parliament for Winnipeg South, on behalf of the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Infrastructure and Communities; Honourable Reg Helwer, Manitoba Minister of Labour, Consumer Protection and Government Services; and His Worship, Brian Bowman, Mayor of the City of Winnipeg, have announced a joint investment of over $550 million for the second phase of upgrades to the North End Sewage Treatment Plant in Winnipeg. Click here to continue reading

Hazmat team investigating hydrocarbon spill in Calgary’s Glenmore Reservoir

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

Global News

A Calgary Fire Department hazardous materials team is on the scene at the city’s Glenmore Reservoir after a report of a hydrocarbon spill. CFD public information officer Carol Henke confirmed the City of Calgary’s Glenmore Boat Patrol reported the spill just after noon Thursday. The spill appeared to be coming from a construction site near the Glenmore Sailing Club. Hazmat crews on scene are taking samples to try to determine the substance, as well as the source of the spill. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Prawns destroyed after highly contagious white spot virus found on NSW north coast farm

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

The Guardian

Biosecurity teams have overseen the culling and disposal of prawns at a New South Wales north coast farm after detecting a highly contagious virus with the potential to severely damage the crustacean industry. White spot is a viral infection that affects crustaceans including prawns, yabbies and crabs, causing the rapid death of up to 80% of a prawns in a farm. An outbreak in 2016 forced the closure of four prawn farms in south-east Queensland, costing farmers and associated industries almost $400m. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Dealing with drought: how fog collectors are providing trees with water in Spain

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

The Guardian

As summer fires continue to devastate huge areas of woodland in Spain, France and Portugal, and drought plagues Europe and the UK leaving tens of thousands of acres at risk of desertification, some scientists are busy collecting fog. The EU-backed Life Nieblas project (niebla is Spanish for fog) is using fog collectors in Gran Canaria in Spain’s Canary Islands, and Portugal, to improve degraded landscape and fuel reforestation. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: River-flow rates in England at lowest point since 2002, data shows

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

The Guardian

River-flow rates in England have been lower this summer than at any time in the past 21 years, data has shown, and could be much worse next year, with dire impacts on wildlife and the natural environment, conservation experts have warned. Analysis since 2002 of England’s groundwater, reservoir levels and river flows – three key indicators for the severity of drought, and for river health – shows that July this year was the worst in that period. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘We’re dwindling like the salmon’: the Indigenous nations fighting for water rights

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

The Guardian

In the Bay-Delta, the watershed formed by the two mighty rivers at the heart of California’s water system – the Sacramento and the San Joaquin – signs of worsening climate conditions intensify year after year. Once abundant species of plants and animals that call these spaces home are disappearing. Flourishing toxic algal blooms threaten the health of the rivers and the people who live near them. As temperatures surge, there’s even less water to go around. Click here to continue reading

2019-2021 N.W.T.-B.C. Bilateral Water Management Report released

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

Water Canada

The Government of the Northwest Territories and the Government of British Columbia are pleased to report on initiatives undertaken between 2019 and 2021 related to implementation of the Northwest Territories-British Columbia Bilateral Water Management Agreement. Click here to continue reading

Ahousaht First Nation celebrates completion of their new wastewater treatment plant

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

Water Canada

Ahousaht First Nation is celebrating the completion of their new wastewater treatment plant, located at Ahousaht First Nation’s Maaqtusiis Reserve No. 15. This plant replaces the old septic tank treatment and lift station, as well as the old outfall pipe, which was located in an area with a shellfish habitat sensitive to sewage contamination. The old system was unable to properly protect seafood safety and did not meet regulatory standards. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Drought, pollution, floods: Avon in Devon tells story of UK rivers in distress

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

The Guardian

On its journey from the highest reaches of south Dartmoor in Devon, the River Avon plays host to egrets and herons, entertains anglers seeking brown trout and salmon, offers open water for swimmers and lays out its banks for paddling children and picnicking hikers. Witnesses to its journey change over the years, but it remains, seemingly a constant force, rising from its source and pulled by gravity to the sea. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pakistan declares emergency as floods hit over 30 million people

PUBLISHED: 26 August 2022

The Guardian

Heavy rain has pounded large areas of Pakistan as the government declared an emergency to deal with monsoon flooding it said had affected more than 30 million people. The annual monsoon is essential for irrigating crops and replenishing lakes and dams across the Indian subcontinent, but each year it also brings a wave of destruction. The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) said on Friday that more than 900 people had been killed this year – including 34 in the previous 24 hours – as a result of the monsoon rains that began in June. Click here to continue reading

York Region receives municipal innovation award for record-setting sewage system project

PUBLISHED: 25 August 2022

Water Canada

The Peter J. Marshall Innovation Award Jury presented its highest award to The Regional Municipality of York for its York Durham Sewage System Forcemain Twinning Project. The project broke records for the use of innovative microtunneling technology, which reduced disruption to the public and environment. The Plaque Award was presented to York Region Chairman and CEO, Wayne Emmerson, and Chief of Staff, Lina Bigioni on the main stage of the 2022 AMO Conference in Ottawa. Click here to continue reading

‘Victory for nature’: Grasslands west of Claresholm protected by new conservation agreement

PUBLISHED: 25 August 2022

Calgary Herald

A section of natural grasslands and limber pine forests located in the foothills south of Calgary will be protected under a new agreement with local landowners. The Nature Conservancy of Canada said a 643-hectare property in the MD of Willow Creek, west of Claresholm, will be combined with another section of wilderness already protected in the Porcupine Hills. Click here to continue reading

‘They’re not supposed to be here’: Invasive crayfish found in Banff National Park

PUBLISHED: 25 August 2022

Calgary Herald

Parks Canada officials are raising alarms after finding an invasive crayfish in Banff National Park, upstream from Calgary. Ecologists captured the northern crayfish on Aug. 6 near a tributary stream flowing into Bow Lake, the source of the Bow River. The Parks Canada aquatic invasive species team spent several days investigating a reported crayfish sighting and setting traps before snagging the crayfish, according to Megan Goudie, an aquatic ecologist with the federal agency. Click here to continue reading

Concerns raised over proposed Bow River development

PUBLISHED: 25 August 2022

CTV News

The healthy wetlands along the Bow River on Calgary’s southern edge are loaded with bird, plant and insect species, and all that life could soon have a lot of company. In June, the city’s planning and infrastructure committee gave preliminary approval to five new communities along the city’s edge. Three of them will be built on the Ricardo Ranch lands, immediately east of Highway 2 on the north side of the Bow River. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UK weather: torrential rain batters parts of country as storm warning issued

PUBLISHED: 25 August 2022

The Guardian

Torrential downpours have battered parts of the UK as yellow thunderstorm warnings came into force for London and the south-east, the east of England and the east Midlands until 3pm on Thursday. The Environment Agency issued six alerts for areas where “flooding is possible”. Forecasters have predicted flooding to be likely amid “intense downpours” and have warned that 50mm (1.97in) of rain could fall in a short space of time in some areas, with one part of Essex being hit by more than 25mm of rain in one hour. Click here to continue reading

Federal minister denies water testing allegations made by Sask. government

PUBLISHED: 25 August 2022

CBC News

Canada’s environment minister is denying the Saskatchewan government’s allegations that federal scientists purposely trespassed on private farmland and were testing water samples for nitrates or nutrients related to farm runoff. On Sunday, Saskatchewan Minister Responsible for the Water Security Agency Jeremy Cockrill posted a public letter to federal Minister for Environment and Climate Change Canada Steven Guilbeault. Click here to continue reading

Canada’s Core Public Infrastructure survey provides new data about water infrastructure to Canadian communities

PUBLISHED: 25 August 2022

Water Canada

On August 19, the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Infrastructure and Communities, welcomed the latest release of data on the status of Canada’s water infrastructure through Canada’s Core Public Infrastructure (CCPI) survey, for reference year 2020. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UK sewage turning Channel and North Sea into dumping ground, say French MEPs

PUBLISHED: 25 August 2022

The Guardian

Britain is threatening human health, marine life and fishing by releasing raw sewage into the Channel and the North Sea, say three French Euro MPs. They have asked the European Commission to seek “political and legal” measures to stop the pollution, accusing the UK of abandoning international environmental regulations. The official complaint comes after dozens of beaches in England and Wales were pinpointed as posing a pollution risk for bathers. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flash floods wreak havoc in US south-west – but are no salve for drought

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

The Guardian

Flash floods hitting the American south-west in recent days have shuttered parts of national parks including in Moab and Zion, closed highways in Colorado, submerged cars in Texas and trapped tourists in a New Mexico cave. A young woman remains missing after being swept away while hiking in Zion on Friday. But the destructive deluges have not been enough to relieve the drought and the continued pressure on water resources, experts say. Even strong storms are unable to overcome dry conditions that are decades in the making. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Europe facing its worst drought in 500 years – study

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

The Western Producer

Europe is facing its worst drought in at least 500 years, with two-thirds of the continent in a state of alert or warning, reducing inland shipping, electricity production and the yields of certain crops, a European Union agency said on Tuesday. The August report of the European Drought Observatory (EDO), overseen by the European Commission, said 47 percent of Europe is under warning conditions, with clear deficit of soil moisture, and 17 percent in a state of alert, in which vegetation is affected. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Biggest seismic testing for oil and gas at odds with Australia’s net zero push, activists say

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

The Guardian

Fishers and community groups have expressed alarm over what has been described as the biggest seismic testing for oil and gas ever planned off the Victorian coast, saying it is at odds with the Albanese government’s climate commitments. The oilfield services companies TGS and Schlumberger have told local fishers they plan to conduct 3D testing in a large area in the Otway Basin off the coast of Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia. Click here to continue reading

Managing microplastics: The Great Lakes Plastic Cleanup

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

Water Canada

The Great Lakes are the largest freshwater system on the planet, accounting for about one-fifth of the world’s surface fresh water. Variations in lake depth, climate, and geology in the region help sustain rich diversity, including more than 350 species of fish and over 3,500 plant and animal species, some of which are found nowhere else on Earth. Click here to continue reading

Canada, Ontario to compensate Mitaanjigamiing First Nation more than a century after dam destroyed reserve lands

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Before the dam, water flowed into Stanjikoming Bay from the Rainy River through a narrow channel lined with trees and underbrush. People came from afar to the area replete with manomin, muskrat, ducks and geese drawn by wild rice beds. And then the dam was built. The lake rose and flooded the wild rice beds, the channel and the surrounding land. Now, the waterway is wide and shallow, lined with sandy shores. Two more channels also flow into the bay. There is no wild rice; the geese and ducks fly past. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Australian government launches offshore petroleum exploration permits for 47,000 sq km of ocean

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

The Guardian

The Albanese government has launched its first offshore petroleum exploration permits, opening up nearly 47,000 sq km of Australian waters to oil and gas exploration. Ten areas stretching from the Ashmore and Cartier Islands in the Indian Ocean to Victoria’s Gippsland basin have been opened for exploration, in what the resources minister, Madeleine King, said would “play an important role in securing future energy supplies”. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: China issues alert as drought and heatwave put crops at risk

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

The Guardian

A drought in China is threatening food production, prompting the government to order local authorities to take all available measures to ensure crops survive the hottest summer on record. On Tuesday, four government departments issued an urgent joint emergency notice, warning that the autumn harvest was under “severe threat”. It urged local authorities to ensure “every unit of water … be used carefully”, and called for methods included staggered irrigation, the diversion of new water sources, and cloud seeding. Click here to continue reading

Discovery Islands surfacing as a humpback hot spot

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

It’s marvellously symbolic that Nick the humpback whale returns year after year with her offspring to the waters surrounding the Discovery Islands, wedged between B.C.’s remote central coast and Vancouver Island. Isolated sightings of humpbacks were reported in the Georgia Strait again in the mid-1980s, but sightings of the massive marine mammals in the Discovery Islands region have skyrocketed in the past decade, becoming one of the hot spots of activity for the baleen giants in the Salish Sea. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Looks like three more dry months ahead for Europe

PUBLISHED: 24 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Parts of the European Union could face three more months of warmer and drier conditions as Europe weathers a major drought that has fueled forest fires, dried up rivers and devastated crops, the 27−nation bloc’s Earth observation program is warning in a report. Almost half of the 27−nation EU is under drought warning, with conditions worsening in Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Romania and Spain. The report also noted rising drought hazards outside the EU, in Britain, Serbia, Ukraine and Moldova. Click here to continue reading

Calgary floaters warned to stay safe on the Bow River

PUBLISHED: 23 August 2022

Global News

It’s summertime and the living is easy. But when it comes to the Bow River, people are being warned that accidents can happen in an instant. Calgary fire officials say calls are down this year over last because fewer people took to the waters in June due to high water levels. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t still busy with calls. Besides the obvious physical dangers one could face on the water, officials say there are other penalties as well. Click here to continue reading

Saskatchewan’s Water Security Agency accepting applications for Flood Damage Reduction Program

PUBLISHED: 23 August 2022

Water Canada

The Minister Responsible for the Saskatchewan Water Security Agency (WSA) Jeremy Cockrill is reminding municipalities of the annual transition of the Emergency Flood Damage Reduction Program (EFDRP) to the Flood Damage Reduction Program (FDRP) for the remainder of the 2022-2023 fiscal year. The transition moves from the emergency focus toward long-term flood mitigation projects. Applications from municipalities will be accepted until September 15, 2022. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Water regulator giving companies a ‘licence to leak’, say MPs and charities

PUBLISHED: 23 August 2022

The Guardian

Ofwat, the water regulator, is not using its full powers to clamp down on sewage pollution and leaks, ministers, MPs and charities have said. The regulator has been criticised for giving water companies a “licence to leak” for years and not curbing massive bonuses for CEOs who preside over a system of pollution and chaos. Last week there was outcry after the chief executive of Ofwat appeared to defend water companies, arguing that they had made investments, that leaks were not due to old pipes, and that a lack of reservoir building had been due to low demand. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Torrential rains lash southern US as millions under flood warnings

PUBLISHED: 23 August 2022

The Guardian

Millions of Americans are under flood warnings after heavy rain this weekend in a large portion of the south and south-western US, where high waters submerged vehicles in Texas and swept hikers in Arizona off their feet. Government meteorologists issued flood warnings for more than 13 million people after torrential rainfall created life-threatening conditions in a region including north-east Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas and New Mexico. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Fears over English shellfish as untreated waste dumped in water

PUBLISHED: 23 August 2022

The Guardian

English shellfish could be contaminated with sewage as untreated human waste was dumped 29,000 times by water companies last year in the water where they are cultivated. The new statistics found sewage was dumped into waters containing shellfish for 207,013 hours in one year. The worst offenders were South West, Southern Water and Anglian Water. There are fears that this could be happening again this year. Click here to continue reading

Canada and Manitoba invest in a new regional wastewater treatment facility

PUBLISHED: 23 August 2022

Water Canada

Terry Duguid, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Member of Parliament for Winnipeg South, on behalf of the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Infrastructure and Communities; the Honourable Reg Helwer, Manitoba’s Minister of Labour, Consumer Protection and Government Services; and Stan Toews, Chair of the Red-Seine-Rat (RSR) Wastewater Cooperative, have announced more than $39 million in funding for the construction of a regional mechanical wastewater treatment facility and collection network to service four communities in southeastern Manitoba. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: China’s largest lake is so dry it must dig deep to water crops

PUBLISHED: 23 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

With China’s biggest freshwater lake dried to historic lows by drought, work crews are digging trenches to keep water flowing to irrigate crops. The dramatic decline of water coverage in Poyang Lake in the central province of Jiangxi otherwise had cut off irrigation channels to neighboring farmlands in one of China’s key rice−growing regions. But the crews using excavators to dig the trenches only work after dark due to the daytime heat, the official Xinhua News Agency reported. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Swiss glaciers have melted to half their size since the early 1930s

PUBLISHED: 23 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Switzerland’s 1,400 glaciers have lost more than half their total volume since the early 1930s, a new study has found, and researchers say the ice retreat is accelerating at a time of growing concerns about climate change. ETH Zurich, a respected federal polytechnic university, and the Swiss Federal Institute on Forest, Snow and Landscape Research on Monday announced the findings from a first−ever reconstruction of ice loss in Switzerland in the 20th century, based in part on an analysis of changes to the topography of glaciers since 1931. Click here to continue reading

Warming waters could force Arctic whales further north, research suggests

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

CBC News

Big changes could lie ahead for the ranges of whales like narwhals, bowheads and belugas that rely on cold water and sea ice, suggests a new study from the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources. These Arctic whales will move further north by the end of this century as sea ice fades and water temperatures rise, the study predicts. By 2100, the southern limits of Arctic whales’ distribution areas could move roughly 250 kilometres north in summer and roughly 125 kilometres north in winter. Click here to continue reading

Angling restrictions in heat-stressed Bow, other rivers take effect Saturday

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

Calgary Herald

Provincial officials are hoping to reel in the impacts on heat-stressed fish in the Bow and other southern Alberta rivers by imposing angling restrictions that start Saturday. As of 2 p.m. and extending to midnight daily, angling will be forbidden in the Bow and other rivers in south and southwestern parts of the province to give a break to fish stressed by low water levels that have led to elevated temperatures. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Horn of Africa drought places 22 million people at risk of starvation, says UN

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

The Guardian

The number of people at risk of starvation in the drought-ravaged Horn of Africa has increased to 22 million, the UN’s world food programme (WFP) says. Years of insufficient rainfall across Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia have caused the worst drought in 40 years and conditions akin to famine in the hardest-hit areas, aid groups say. An unprecedented four failed rainy seasons has killed millions of livestock, destroyed crops and forced 1.1 million people from their homes in search of food and water. Click here to continue reading

‘Everyone deserves it’: Business owners work to bring clean water to First Nations communities

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

CTV News

As of July 18, there were 31 long-term drinking water advisories in 27 First Nation communities, figures from the federal government show. Some, such as Neskantaga First Nation in northern Ontario, have been under a long-term drinking water advisory for nearly three decades. The Liberals under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau have promised since 2015 to end the advisories. Although the federal government has lifted 135 long-term drinking water advisories since November 2015, its latest figures show it also added 66 advisories during that time. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Activists call out ‘lack of political will’ at slow-moving UN ocean negotiations

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

After a sluggish first week, activists took to the streets of New York City to push delegates negotiating a United Nations high seas treaty to act with urgency. The “high seas” — waters that aren’t managed by a nation — account for roughly two-thirds of the world’s oceans. The vast majority are unprotected. A UN high seas treaty would be the first legally binding conservation framework for these waters, and would enable protection from overfishing, industry, resource extraction — like deep sea mining — and other activities. The treaty is key if the world is to protect 30 per cent of oceans by 2030, something more than 100 countries, including Canada, have called for. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Endangered sea turtles found on Louisiana islands for first time in 75 years

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

The Guardian

For the first time in 75 years, hatchlings of the world’s smallest sea turtle species have been discovered on the Chandeleur Islands, a chain of barrier islands in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of New Orleans. Wildlife experts at the Breton national wildlife refuge have documented more than 53 turtle crawls and two live hatchlings that were navigating towards the sea, Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority announced in a press statement this week. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: England’s highly paid water bosses rake it in from lucrative second jobs

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

The Guardian

Some of the highly paid bosses of England’s water companies are earning tens of thousands of pounds in second boardroom jobs, advising on the pay deals of other top executives. Five of the chief executives of England’s nine water and sewerage companies are also working as non-executive directors in other firms, sitting on remuneration committees. Campaigners say it is inappropriate for water bosses to be helping to fix the pay and bonuses of senior executives in other companies. Click here to continue reading

Newly formed non-profit aims to provide inclusive experience of Alberta waters

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

Global News

A newly formed non-profit in Alberta is ensuring the province’s rivers and lakes can be enjoyed by everyone. Accessible Waters allows people with disabilities to experience the water — a first-of-its-kind inclusive recreation option in the province. The wheelchair-accessible boat hit the water in June. It’s been completely retrofitted for those with mobility limitations in mind. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Tasmanian salmon industry used more than 2,400 anti-seal explosives in three months

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

The Guardian

The Tasmanian salmon industry used more than 2,400 underwater explosives against seals in the last quarter, with Huon Aquaculture reporting the death of two seals on its leases. Department of Natural Resources and Environment data disclosed under Right to Information laws show Huon Aquaculture used 1,887 explosives in the three months to the end of June, a rate of more than 20 a day. The company has used more than 10,600 since January 2021. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: New Zealand’s flood-prone areas not ready to cope with climate crisis, Ardern says

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

The Guardian

New Zealand’s flood- and slip-prone regions do not have the mechanisms in place to cope with rapid environmental changes brought about by the climate crisis, Jacinda Ardern has said after visiting the aftermath of a monster storm. The prime minister was touring the site of devastating flooding and landslips around Nelson, at the top of the South Island, when she was asked if she was satisfied that New Zealand had the framework and investment to cope with weather events that are becoming more frequent. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sewage monitors faulty at seaside spots in England and Wales, data shows

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

The Guardian

Sewage monitors at some popular seaside destinations in England and Wales are faulty or not installed, Environment Agency data has revealed, meaning people could be swimming in human waste this summer without realising. Seaside holidays this year have been marred by water companies pumping raw sewage into the ocean, with popular beaches in areas including Sussex and Devon having to close. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: China drought causes Yangtze to dry up, sparking shortage of hydropower

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

The Guardian

A record-breaking drought has caused some rivers in China – including parts of the Yangtze – to dry up, affecting hydropower, halting shipping, and forcing major companies to suspend operations. A nationwide drought alert was issued on Friday as a long-running and severe heatwave in China’s heavily populated south-west was forecast to continue well into September. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Is it time to give up on doomed fisheries?

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

In the 1980s, Rich Hittinger’s favourite rite of early spring was chasing winter flounder. On many March days, he anchored his six-metre boat, Ermala — named for his three children, Eric, Mark, and Lauren — in a sheltered cove in Narragansett Bay, the estuary off Rhode Island’s southeastern coast. He and the kids chummed the water with rabbit feed and lowered hooks baited with clam worms, then ducked into the boat’s cabin to warm their bellies with hot chocolate. Click here to continue reading

Funding for USask-led water monitoring network will help understand, manage floods, drought: director

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

CBC News

Four research centres at the University of Saskatchewan are getting nearly $170 million in funding, and the work done at one centre is necessary for understanding and addressing a water crisis in Canada, its director says. Saskatchewan suffered floods in 2011 and 2014, and droughts from 2001 until as recently as last year. Click here to continue reading

Bonnybrook Wastewater Treatment Plant: From waste gas to five megawatts of power

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

Water Canada

Today, Bonnybrook is taking biogas handling to the highest level: Using all of its biogas as the primary fuel source to meet its needs for electric power and industrial steam for its advanced treatment process. A first in Canada, the Bonnybrook Cogeneration Expansion Project is currently undergoing commissioning and system operational testing in preparation for handover to the City of Calgary. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: China battles brush fires, extends power rationing in drought

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Brush fires have forced the evacuation of more than 1,500 people in southwest China and power rationing for factories has reportedly been extended as weeks of record heat and drought batter the region. Some shopping malls in the megacity of Chongqing have been ordered closed for most of the day to reduce electricity demand, state broadcaster CCTV said, limiting opening hours to 4 to 9 p.m. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: European drought exposes ancient stones, old bombs, dry lakebeds

PUBLISHED: 22 August 2022

CBC News

Weeks of baking drought across Europe have seen water levels in rivers and lakes fall to levels few can remember, exposing long-submerged treasures and a few unwanted hazards. In Spain, suffering its worst drought in decades, archaeologists have been delighted by the emergence of a prehistoric stone circle dubbed the “Spanish Stonehenge” that is usually covered by the waters of a dam. Click here to continue reading

Team releases endangered northern leopard frog tadpoles into B.C. wetlands

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

CTV News

More than 1,900 tadpoles of the endangered northern leopard frog have been released into the wild in the last few months. The Wilder Institute/Calgary Zoo says it has been working with other conservation groups, governments and zoos to breed, translocate and release the frogs into wetlands in interior British Columbia. The zoo says the northern leopard frog is found in three populations in Canada — in the east, the western boreal and prairies, and in the Rocky Mountains. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Warming oceans are causing shrimp to snap louder. Here’s why that’s a problem

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

CTV News

As oceans around the world get warmer due to climate change, snapping shrimp are becoming louder than usual, creating “far-reaching implications” for various marine ecosystems, a new study has found. Researchers at the U.S.-based Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) say this study is the first of its kind that looked into the relationship between rising temperatures and the frequency and volume of the sound produced by two snapping shrimp species. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: New Zealand floods could take years to clean up, with 1,200 people displaced

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

The Guardian

Torrential downpours that have battered New Zealand for four days straight have caused floods that could take years to clean up and displaced at least 1,200 people from their homes in the top of the South Island. Friday’s rain comes on top of weeks of wet weather and is worsening conditions in New Zealand’s already sodden landscape. Experts have attributed the unseasonably wet weather to a narrow stream of water vapour, or “atmospheric river”, sitting above the country. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Why are some areas of the UK in drought? A visual guide

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

The Guardian

Despite the heavy rain and thunderstorms that have hit the UK this week, several areas of the country remain in drought. Drought was officially declared across eight regions of England on Friday 12 August, with a ninth – Yorkshire – added a few days later. There is no single definition for a drought, but one way of describing it is a prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall, leading to a shortage of water. In the UK, many areas had much lower than average rainfall for July. Click here to continue reading

Coasts need living shorelines to stave off erosion, says P.E.I. researcher

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

CBC News

Researchers and watershed coordinators are working together to mitigate coastal erosion on P.E.I., using a set of powerful natural solutions to create what they call living shorelines. Living shorelines harness plants that naturally grow on P.E.I. to trap sand and topsoil and prevent the coast from eroding, says Erin Nelson, a climate research assistant with TransCoastal Adaptations, a centre for nature-based solutions that’s based at Saint Mary’s University in Nova Scotia. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Hunger stones, wrecks and bones: Europe’s drought brings past to surface

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

The Guardian

The warning could not be starker. Wenn du mich siehst, dann weine (“If you see me, then weep”), reads the grim inscription on a rock in the Elbe River near the northern Czech town of Děčín, close to the German border. As Europe’s rivers run dry in a devastating drought that scientists say could prove the worst in 500 years, their receding waters are revealing long-hidden artefacts, from Roman camps to ghost villages and second world war shipwrecks. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Rare golden algae may have caused fish deaths in Oder River, says minister

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

The Guardian

Rare micro-organisms known as golden algae could be the cause of a mass die-off of fish in the Oder River that has puzzled scientists for days, Poland’s environment minister has suggested. The algal bloom could cause the appearance of toxins that killed fish and clams but were not considered harmful to humans.  Click here to continue reading

CRD board approves regional water supply 2022 master plan

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

Water Canada

The Capital Regional District (CRD) Board has approved the Regional Water Supply 2022 Master Plan. The Plan was approved by the Regional Water Supply Commission in July and will guide a proposed infrastructure program to be implemented over the next 30 years, based on the projected population, the impacts of climate change, water treatment requirements resulting from changing raw water quality characteristics and regulatory requirements. Recommendations will continue to be reassessed, on a five-to-10-year cycle, to consider new information and latest trends and each project will require CRD Board budget approval. Click here to continue reading

Sarnia advancing action plan in response to flooding

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

Water Canada

Building on work already underway, the City of Sarnia will implement an action plan to better address the impacts of flooding caused by extreme weather events. The development and implementation of the plan is in response to last week’s storm event that caused basement flooding across the community, most notably in the Coronation Park area. The plan will include both short- and long-term action items to better prepare City and private-property stormwater / sanitary sewer infrastructure for the impacts of extreme weather. Click here to continue reading

CSA Group releases guide to help Canadian municipalities implement community water standards

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

Water Canada

Floods and rainstorms comprise a significant portion of weather-related natural disasters that occur each year. There are several factors contributing to this trend, including changes in the intensity, frequency, or duration of precipitation due to climate change and a higher number of properties in flood-prone areas. Municipalities shoulder the burden of responding to these events and their aftermath. To help municipalities improve their resiliency and protect against flooding, CSA Group has published The Municipal How-to Guide which provides municipalities with a detailed framework, including a three-step process, to help them implement community water standards into municipal planning and approval processes. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: PFAS: Possible breakthrough to destroy harmful ‘forever chemicals’

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2022

BBC Science News

Chemists have identified how to destroy “forever chemicals” in a low-cost way for the first time, new research says. Scientists have linked exposure to the substances, known as PFAS, at certain levels to serious health risks, including cancer and birth defects. Their resistance to water, oil and stains make them highly useful. PFAS are used in hundreds of everyday objects from frying pans to make-up. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Beachgoers warned to stay away after sewage alerts across England and Wales

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

The Guardian

Swimmers have been warned to stay away after sewage was discharged on beaches across England and Wales, predominantly in the south. Pollution alerts have been issued to beachgoers by the Environment Agency, and on some beaches signs have been put up to warn people. The environmental campaign group Surfers Against Sewage (SAS) has collected data that suggests storm sewage discharges have taken place in the waters of beaches in Cornwall, Cumbria, Devon, Essex, Lancashire, Lincolnshire, Northumberland and Sussex. Click here to continue reading

UNESCO team to judge if Alberta’s Wood Buffalo National Park should go on endangered list

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

Global News

A United Nations body that monitors some of the world’s greatest natural glories is in Canada again to assess government responses to ongoing threats to the country’s largest national park, including plans to release treated oilsands tailings into its watershed. In a series of meetings beginning Thursday, UNESCO investigators are to determine whether Wood Buffalo National Park should be on the list of World Heritage Sites In Danger — a move the agency has already deemed likely. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Violent storms slam France with hail, rain and heavy winds

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

CBC News

After a summer of drought, heat waves and forest fires, violent storms are whipping France and have flooded Paris subway stations and snarled traffic. Winds of more than 100 km/h were recorded at the top of the Eiffel Tower during a flash flood Tuesday, and similar winds were forecast Wednesday in the southeast. Hail hammered Paris and other regions in Tuesday’s sudden storm. Rainwater gushed down metro station stairwells and onto platforms, and cars sloshed along embankments where the Seine River broke its banks. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Floating ‘artificial leaves’ ride the wave of clean fuel production

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

ScienceDaily

Researchers have developed floating ‘artificial leaves’ that generate clean fuels from sunlight and water, and could eventually operate on a large scale at sea. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, designed ultra-thin, flexible devices, which take their inspiration from photosynthesis — the process by which plants convert sunlight into food. Since the low-cost, autonomous devices are light enough to float, they could be used to generate a sustainable alternative to petrol without taking up space on land. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sleeping giant could end deep ocean life

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

ScienceDaily

A previously overlooked factor — the position of continents — helps fill Earth’s oceans with life-supporting oxygen. Continental movement could ultimately have the opposite effect, killing most deep ocean creatures. The water at the ocean’s surface becomes colder and denser as it approaches the north or south pole, then sinks. As the water sinks, it transports oxygen pulled from Earth’s atmosphere down to the ocean floor. Click here to continue reading

Oil sheen from sunken boat in Salish Sea has dissipated, officials say

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

CBC News

The Washington state Department of Ecology says an oil sheen from a sunken fish boat appears to have completely dissipated from an area of U.S. waters just east of Vancouver Island. The update comes as the U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies work to recover the 15-metre Aleutian Isle, which went down Saturday with about 10,000 litres of oil and diesel aboard. Five crew members were saved, but the vessel now lies in roughly 60 metres of water near San Juan Island, Wash., in Haro Strait, about 25 kilometres east of Victoria. Click here to continue reading

Angling restrictions could come to parts of Alberta as warm water causes ‘stress in fish’: biologist

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

Global News

Warm weather and “quite low flows” in some of Alberta’s waterways could soon prompt angling restrictions for southern and southwestern parts of the province, according to a biologist. While angling restrictions have not yet been announced, Christensen said that could happen as early as Saturday. If the restrictions are announced, he said they would take effect at 2 p.m. Saturday and likely remain in place until 11:59 p.m. on Aug. 31. The restrictions would still allow angling to take place each day, but not between 2 p.m. and midnight. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Snow research fills gap in understanding Arctic climate

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

ScienceDaily

Comprehensive data from several seasons of field research in the Alaskan Arctic will address uncertainties in Earth-system and climate-change models about snow cover across the region and its impacts on water and the environment. The research found that spatial distribution depends most heavily on vegetation, elevation and landscape features, such as stream banks and benches — areas of topographic variability where shrubs grow and snow accumulates. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Are indoor vertical farms really ‘future-proofing agriculture’?

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

The Guardian

With the world’s population expected to reach nearly 10 billion by 2050, most of whom will be living in cities, experts say it will require a 70% increase from current levels of global food production. But with agricultural land in short supply thanks to climate crisis and urbanization, it’s clear today’s food systems are not ready. It’s estimated there are more than 2,000 vertical farms in the US growing produce such as lettuce, herbs and berries. Market leaders such as Plenty, Bowery, Kalera and AeroFarms – which can operate 365 days a year regardless of weather conditions – and sprawling greenhouses from companies like AppHarvest and Gotham Greens, see themselves as part of the solution. And investors clearly agree. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The Mideast’s holy Jordan River runs short on water

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Symbolically and spiritually, the river is of mighty significance to many. Physically, the Lower Jordan River of today is a lot more meager than mighty. By the time it reaches the baptismal site, its dwindling water looks sluggish, a dull brownish green shade. Its decline, due to a confluence of factors, is intertwined with the entanglements of the decades−old Arab−Israeli conflict and rivalry over precious water in a valley where so much is contested. Championing the transboundary Jordan’s revival without wading into the thicket of the disputes that have fueled its deterioration can be a challenge. Click here to continue reading

Draining tailings into Athabasca River one solution under review in oilpatch, says Guilbeault

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

CBC News

Releasing treated oilsands tailings into the environment isn’t the only solution being considered to clean up the massive toxic ponds in northern Alberta, federal Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault says. Guilbeault said Wednesday that even though his government is developing regulations on how the tailings could be drained into the Athabasca River, other solutions are under review. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: China is seeding clouds to replenish its shrinking Yangtze River

PUBLISHED: 18 August 2022

CNN

Chinese planes are firing rods into the sky to bring more rainfall to its crucial Yangtze River, which has dried up in parts, as swaths of the nation fall into drought and grapple with the worst heat wave on record. Several regions on the Yangtze have launched weather modification programs, but with cloud cover too thin, operations in some drought-ravaged parts of the river’s basin have remained on standby. The Ministry of Water Resources said in a notice on Wednesday that drought throughout the Yangtze river basin was “adversely affecting drinking water security of rural people and livestock, and the growth of crops.” Click here to continue reading

CWN plays key role in new report on COVID-19 wastewater surveillance

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

Water Canada

The Royal Society of Canada has prepared a policy briefing report on Wastewater Surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in Canada. The development of the report was led by Dr. Steve E. Hrudey, chair of the Royal Society of Canada’s Policy Briefing Working Group and chair of the National Research Advisory Group for Canadian Water Network’s (CWN) COVID-19 Wastewater Coalition. Bernadette Conant, the past CEO of CWN, is also one of the lead authors of the report. Click here to continue reading

B.C.’s largest coastline cleanup sets new targets

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

Water Canada

New projects funded by the Province in partnership with coastal communities and Indigenous Peoples will clean as much as 1,000 kilometres of B.C.’s coastline, remove as many as 30 derelict vessels and support local jobs. An additional $3.8 million from the Clean Coast, Clean Waters Initiative Fund will be used this summer to tackle the cleanup and removal of polluting marine debris, and create 440 jobs in coastal and Indigenous communities. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: US issues western water cuts as drought leaves Colorado River near ‘tipping point’

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

The Guardian

After western US states failed to reach agreements to reduce water use from the beleaguered Colorado River, the federal government stepped in on Tuesday, issuing cuts that will affect two states and Mexico. Officials with the Bureau of Reclamation declared a “tier 2” shortage in the river basin as the drought continues to pummel the American west, pushing its largest reservoirs to new lows. The waning water levels, which have left dramatic bathtub rings in reservoirs and unearthed buried bodies and other artifacts, continue to threaten hydroelectric power production, drinking water, and agricultural production. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Eastern Australia faces wet weather and flooding with 70% chance of third consecutive La Niña

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

The Guardian

Australia could be lashed with more rain and possible floods for the next three months with La Niña conditions predicted to return for a rare third consecutive year. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology raised the El Niño-Southern Oscillation La Niña outlook from “watch” to “alert” on Tuesday afternoon. Senior meteorologist Jonathan How said the risk of La Niña returning this spring was about three times higher than normal. Under such conditions, it has developed about 70% of the time. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Ridge-to-reef ecosystem census reveals hidden reservoir for microbiomes

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

ScienceDaily

Researchers collected more than 3,000 samples of microbes and microbiomes present in the entire watershed of Waimea Valley on O’ahu, Hawai’i. Their investigation revealed three key discoveries: microbes follow the food web, most of the microbial diversity in a watershed is maintained within the soil and stream water and the local distribution of a microbe predicts its global distribution. Click here to continue reading

‘Needed a rebound year’: Alberta farmers say extreme heat nowhere near as bad as 2021 heat dome

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

CTV News

Farmers in the province say while the heat warning over much of southern Alberta is concerning, it’s nowhere near as bad as last summer’s heat dome. Ian Chitwood farms near Airdrie and grows wheat, barley, canola and feed for livestock. Chitwood said the extreme heat in parts of southern Alberta is causing crops to rapidly grow, bringing harvest on faster this year. He said since farmers in the Calgary area got lots of moisture early in the season, the heat now is less of a blow. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pakistan floods kill 580 and bring misery to millions

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

The Guardian

More than 580 people have died and thousands have lost their homes across Pakistan as torrential rains batter the country. An estimated 1 million have been affected by heavy rainfall, flash floods and landslides since July as Pakistan endured more than 60% of its normal total monsoon rainfall in three weeks. Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Sindh provinces have been the worst affected, with heavy rainfall predicted across Pakistan until Friday. At least one man was killed in Karachi on Tuesday as non-stop rains hit Pakistan’s largest city for two consecutive days. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: NSW flood inquiry opts not to recommend raising of Warragamba dam wall

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

The Guardian

The New South Wales flood inquiry has stopped short of recommending raising the Warragamba Dam wall, listing the $2bn-plus project as just one option governments have to reduce flood risks in Sydney’s Hawkesbury-Nepean valley. The inquiry’s report, released on Wednesday by the state government, identified pros and cons of raising the wall of Sydney’s main source of drinking water by 14 metres. The project was not one of its 28 recommendations. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Thames Water announces hosepipe ban across south of England

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

The Guardian

Thames Water has announced a hosepipe ban across the south of England, which will affect 15 million of its customers. The ban will come into force from 24 August, affecting people in London and the Thames Valley area. Using a hosepipe to water gardens or to clean cars will no longer be allowed, except by businesses and farmers. The temporary ban comes after reports that the source of the Thames had dried up during the drought. Click here to continue reading

 

‘Genius engineering’: the battle to save Hawaii’s historic fish ponds

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

The Guardian

Neglected and polluted, the ponds were nearly barren of native species. But community efforts are starting to pay off. There are dozens of these man-made, rockwall-enclosed sites across Hawaii, including one spanning 88 acres, and for centuries, Native Hawaiians have used these ponds to raise fish to feed their communities. But over time, the ponds have been neglected, damaged by molten lava, polluted with the litter of island-hopping tourists, and in some cases overrun by mangrove trees, which can destroy fish ponds with their roots and dense biomass. Just over a decade ago, these ponds were almost barren of the native fish species that once fed families. Click here to continue reading

City-USask projects target Métis history, clean runoff, green rental housing

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

Water Canada

In three new projects, University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers are aiming to trace and reconcile Métis history in Saskatoon, prevent a toxic compound from entering the river, and expand participation of low-income renters and landlords in civic home energy efficiency programs. The projects have been awarded a total of more than $86,000 through Research Junction, an innovative collaboration between USask and the City of Saskatoon to apply advanced research methods to addressing contemporary urban issues for the benefit of residents. Click here to continue reading

AECOM to provide filtration engineering services for the Mission Hill Water Treatment Plant

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

Water Canada

AECOM has announced it has been awarded a contract by the Regional District North Okanagan (RDNO) to provide engineering services for the construction of a new filtration facility at the Mission Hill Water Treatment Plant (MHWTP) in British Columbia. In this role, AECOM will deliver detailed design and recommended site upgrades for the addition of filtration at the existing MHWTP to help improve water quality, increase access to clean drinking water, and bolster the resiliency of the plant for the Greater Vernon community year-round. Click here to continue reading

PCL puts a spotlight on water leak detection

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

Water Canada

Eddy Smart Home Solutions Ltd.’s (Eddy Solutions) is pleased to announce an ongoing partnership with Southern Ontario progressive developer Edenshaw. The partnership started during the early days of the construction of Edenshaw’s Port Credit-based luxury mid-rise development, TANU, built by PCL Construction. The first full-scale deployment through Eddy’s partnership with PCL, the project aligned all stakeholders including the mechanical and electrical design consultants from construction through to operations, protecting the property from the builder’s risk period to turnover and beyond. Click here to continue reading

City lifts stage 1 water restriction

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

Wetaskiwin Times

Nearly a month after the Stage 1 water restriction was put in place, the City of Wetaskiwin lifted the restriction Friday, August 12, having completed assessment and cleaning of the reservoir. The restriction was first put in place Thursday, July 14, citing contamination discovered i the central reservoir as the reason. Stage 1 water restrictions placed a slight limit on the watering of lawns, and washing of cars, boats, and other vehicles. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: As Mediterranean heats up, climate scientists warn of trouble to come

PUBLISHED: 17 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

While vacationers might enjoy the Mediterranean Sea’s summer warmth, climate scientists are warning of dire consequences for its marine life as it burns up in a series of severe heat waves. From Barcelona to Tel Aviv, scientists say they are witnessing exceptional temperature hikes ranging from 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 Fahrenheit) to 5 degrees Celsius (9 Fahrenheit) above the norm for this time of year. Water temperatures have regularly exceeded 30 C (86 F) on some days. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Eco-friendly filter removes microplastics from water

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

ScienceDaily

A research team led by Professor Lee Ju-hyuck of the Department of Energy Science and Engineering of DGIST, collaborating with the research team of Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (President Lee Nak-gyu) led by Dr. Cho Han-cheol, developed an eco-friendly microplastic removal technology that can remove micro-to-nano-sized microplastics in the water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: As drought hits, what are UK water company chief executives paid?

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

The Guardian

Britain’s biggest water companies have come under the spotlight as the nation swelters during what could become the worst drought in 500 years, with hosepipe bans introduced across much of England in an attempt to fend off shortages. Anger is growing over the huge sums handed to their shareholders and executives, given the companies’ record on tackling leaks and pollution and their failure to build more reservoirs. Politicians and campaigners are calling for water company bosses to have their bonuses banned until they tackle these issues. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UK weather: Met Office warns of ‘dangerous’ floods across country

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

The Guardian

Heavy rain and thunderstorms could cause “dangerous” flooding this week in cities and rural areas across the UK, forecasters have warned. The Met Office has issued a yellow thunderstorm warning for most of the UK on Monday and Tuesday with the possibility of flash flooding, disruption to transport and power cuts. The weather warning will stay in place for southern England on Wednesday, where communities could be cut off by flooded roads and the chance of fast-flowing or deep flood water could cause “danger to life”. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Irreversible declines in freshwater storage projected in parts of Asia by 2060

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

ScienceDaily

The Tibetan Plateau, known as the “water tower” of Asia, supplies freshwater for nearly two billion people who live downstream. New research led by scientists at Penn State, Tsinghua University and the University of Texas at Austin projects that climate change, under a scenario of weak climate policy, will cause irreversible declines in freshwater storage in the region, constituting a total collapse of the water supply for central Asia and Afghanistan and a near-total collapse for Northern India, Kashmir and Pakistan by the middle of the century. Click here to continue reading

Celebrating Canadian water leaders and champions: Water’s Next Awards 2022

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

Water Canada

Since 2010, Water Canada has hosted the Water’s Next Awards to help strengthen and celebrate this national community of water leaders, champions, and innovators. We celebrate these accomplishments as a way of honouring the hard work of water sector professionals that all too often goes unrecognized by the general public. Clean drinking water, healthy rivers, safe wastewater discharge, and tools to help communities understand water are precious gifts to society. Our hope is that these stories will inspire the next generation of water leaders and innovators. Click here to continue reading

Another storm shakes small Sask. town

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

The Western Producer

The town of Kelvington and surrounding area were hit with a devastating storm Aug. 13 that caused extensive damage. Crops were flattened, bins were flipped, trees were broken and buildings were destroyed. There are three co-op facilites in Kelvington. The food store, gas bar and ag and home centre all suffered from the heavy wind and rain. Click here to continue reading

Kayakers and surfers looking forward to adjustable wave on Kananaskis River

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

CBC News

New wave technology is coming to the Lower Kananaskis River, and both surfers and kayakers are stoked to drop in. The project conceived by the Alberta River Surfing Association and Alberta Whitewater Association has finally finished the design phase. Both groups are now ready to go forward with permitting and construction, after a final fundraising push. The plan is to upgrade the province’s river infrastructure by implementing a new adjustable wave concept in Kananaskis Country, about 60 kilometres west of Calgary, that will result in ideal waves mimicking what’s found only in nature. Click here to continue reading

B.C. wildfires on the rise as August turns hot and dry

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

CTV News

After a slow start to wild fire season in B.C., there are now 149 active fires in the province, with 57 of those in the southeast fire zone. For Sparwood B.C. though, there’s one practically in its backyard, and it’s one of four fires of note in the province, meaning it’s larger enough to be given a name. The B.C. wildfire service has dubbed it the Cummings Creek fire. Click here to continue reading

‘We need inches of rain to recover’: Alberta ranchers and farmers desperate for a downpour

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

Global News

Alberta’s heat wave and lack of rain is killing crops and farmland across parts of the province. The stress on ranchers and farmers desperate for rain is taking its toll. Ken Harris, a rancher near Black Diamond, Alta., works hard on his land to yield some measure of success, but knows he can’t rely on it for a living. Harris and his wife run Cedar Creek Ranch and the lack of rain has been devastating. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Emergency housing rollout across flood-hit NSW north coast a ‘dog’s breakfast’, critics say

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

The Guardian

Fewer than 60 emergency housing pods are being occupied in northern New South Wales nearly six months after the region was flooded in February. Critics have lambasted the rollout for poor communication, a lack of transparency and one location being built in a flood zone. Temporary housing measures for flood victims were first announced at the start of March. The NSW government promised in April to provide 2,000 temporary homes including the pods, caravans, motorhomes and accommodation at recreation camps. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UK weather: Devon and Cornwall hit by heavy rain and flooding

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

The Guardian

Flooding has hit parts of the UK as official warnings for rain and thunderstorms remained in place for much of the country, while a drought has been formally declared in Yorkshire. The Environment Agency placed Yorkshire into drought status, joining eight other areas of England declared dry on Friday. The Agency said the recent rainfall would not be enough to correct weeks of dry weather, adding it would take more prolonged rainfall to wet soils and replenish rivers, reservoirs and groundwater levels. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Fuel spill from U.S. boat raises fears for endangered Canadian orcas

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A fishing boat that sank with nearly 10,000 litres of fuel on board near the Canada−U.S. marine border went down in one of the worst possible places for endangered orcas, an ocean pollutants expert says. Peter Ross, a senior scientist with Raincoast Conservation Foundation, said the vessel sank in an important feeding area for endangered southern resident killer whales. It will be a race against time to clean up the spill, he said. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: German industry at risk as drought sinks Rhine water levels

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Germany’s main industry lobby group warned Tuesday that factories may have to throttle production or halt it completely because plunging water levels on the Rhine River are making it harder to transport cargo. Water levels on the Rhine at Emmerich, near the Dutch border, dropped by a further four centimeters (1.6 inches) in 24 hours, hitting zero on the depth gauge. Authorities say the shipping lane itself still has a depth of almost 200 centimeters (six feet, six inches), but the record low measurement Tuesday morning highlights the extreme lack of water caused by months of drought affecting much of Europe. Click here to continue reading

USask researchers explore how floods and droughts are challenging science and society globally

PUBLISHED: 16 August 2022

Water Canada

In a new paper published in Nature, a team of University of Saskatchewan (USask) and international researchers presented their findings from a global investigation to determine gaps in science and policy that require reinforcement to better protect the world from droughts and floods. Forty-five case studies from around the world were used to evaluate when, where, and how current risk management strategies might fail, and where potential improvements could be made. The research team assessed floods and droughts that occurred in the same regions over time to analyze how the occurrence of a first event may affect how a second is managed. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Polio virus found in New York City wastewater, suggesting local transmission

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

CBC News

Health officials identified the virus that causes polio in New York City’s wastewater, suggesting local transmission of the virus, state authorities said on Friday, urging unvaccinated New Yorkers to get vaccinated. The identification comes weeks after a case of polio in an adult was made public on July 21 in Rockland County, marking the nation’s first confirmed case in nearly 10 years. Earlier this month, health officials said the virus was found in wastewater in the New York City suburb a month before health officials there announced the Rockland County case. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Risk of catastrophic megafloods has doubled in California, study finds

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

The Guardian

Driven by the climate crisis, exceedingly rare megafloods will become more common – and more catastrophic – according to a new study that found their likelihood has already doubled in California. The unexpected threat lingers even as browning hillsides, fallowed fields and bathtub ring-laden reservoirs serve as a constant reminder of the drought disaster in the state, which may be woefully unprepared when the coin inevitably flips. Click here to continue reading

Central Alberta crops in good condition, but more rain needed

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Crops in most of Central Alberta are still in good condition, but more rain is needed to improve soil moisture and fill the crops, according to the provincial government’s latest crop report. Over the past two weeks, precipitation has varied in the central and northern parts of the province, the report said. The southern half of the central region region received less than 10 mm, with some receiving less than five mm of moisture. Click here to continue reading

City of Iqaluit declares emergency due to water shortage

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

Ponoka News

The City of Iqaluit declared a state of emergency Friday due to a water shortage. The Nunavut capital said there has been a lack of precipitation this summer and flows in the Apex River, which is Iqaluit’s secondary water resupply source, are at a 40-year low. As a result, Lake Geraldine, which serves as the water reservoir for Iqaluit, will not be replenished before freeze-up. Click here to continue reading

Big hole creating ‘expressway’ for Calgary stormwater

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

Global News

A hole big enough to be seen from aircraft flying overhead is just a tiny part of Calgary’s flood mitigation work. The 13-metre diameter hole along 10 Street N.W. is big enough to lower a bus into it and goes 20 metres underground. A boring machine will make its way to 7 Street N.W. and Memorial Drive, creating a tunnel to connect with the Bow River. Ward 7 Coun. Terry Wong said the upper plateau separation is designed to redirect stormwater from higher elevations directly into the river. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Europe’s rivers run dry as scientists warn drought could be worst in 500 years

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

The Guardian

In places, the Loire can now be crossed on foot; France’s longest river has never flowed so slowly. The Rhine is fast becoming impassable to barge traffic. In Italy, the Po is 2 metres lower than normal, crippling crops. Serbia is dredging the Danube. Across Europe, drought is reducing once-mighty rivers to trickles, with potentially dramatic consequences for industry, freight, energy and food production – just as supply shortages and price rises due to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine bite. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Thames Water accused of ignoring warnings after hundreds in Surrey endure days without water

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

The Guardian

Thames Water has been accused of repeatedly ignoring warnings about cuts to supplies and burst pipes in Surrey where hundreds of households had to endure three days without tap water at the height of this weekend’s heatwave. Residents, including some that were vulnerable, had to queue for bottled water on Saturday in temperatures of well over 30C (86F) after a pump failure at Netley Mill treatment works. By Sunday morning up to 1,000 homes began a third day without water. Supplies were restored to up to 9,000 homes, but many households still complained about low water pressure. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Antarctica ice melt is accelerating, and research says an overlooked coastal current is to blame

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

CTV News

A new study suggests that Antarctica’s ice shelves may be melting faster than previously believed, which is causing sea levels to rise at a more rapid pace and accelerating the dangers of climate change. The study, published in the journal Science Advances on Aug. 12, was conducted by Caltech and Jet Propulsion Laboratory researchers. It’s based on a model that accounts for a narrow ocean current, which runs along the Antarctic coast. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: England ‘failing to invest in water networks to avoid future droughts’

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

The Guardian

England is failing to invest in the water networks needed to avoid a future of recurrent serious droughts, with current policies amounting to the government “keeping [its] fingers crossed”, the UK’s infrastructure chief has warned. The current drought was a warning that water systems could not cope with the changing climate, with more hot dry spells interspersed with heavier rainfall, said Sir John Armitt, chair of the National Infrastructure Commission. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UN member states meet in New York to hammer out high seas treaty

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

The Guardian

UN member states will gather in New York to hammer out a long-awaited treaty that, if agreed, will govern the planet’s last, lawless wilderness: the high seas. Two hundred nautical miles beyond the territorial waters and jurisdiction of nations, the high seas have been treated “recklessly”, according to environmental groups. Warning that the outcome of the talks – which run from Monday until 26 August, will determine the fate of the ocean for generations, they are urging world leaders to agree to an ambitious, legally binding treaty to protect marine life and to reverse biodiversity loss. Click here to continue reading

How has federal protection helped Lake Superior?

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Lake Superior — the biggest of the Great Lakes and one of the largest freshwater ecosystems in the world — has remained relatively pristine compared to the other four. It’s far enough away from the populated urban centres in southern Ontario, its watersheds are largely forested, there’s little industry or agriculture on its shorelines and its especially cold water (an average of 4 C year-round) has kept away invasive species. Yet, even with federal protection on its north shore, Lake Superior is still at risk due to climate change and offshore industrial impacts. Click here to continue reading

Provincial funding for New Brunswick wetland conservation project

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

Water Canada

The provincial government is investing $350,000 in a project that aims to conserve and restore wetlands along the lower Saint John River and mitigate the effects of climate change. The funding will enable Ducks Unlimited Canada to enhance 63 conservation areas along the lower part of the river valley, which frequently experiences major spring flooding. Projects will involve rebuilding and repairing earthworks and water control structures. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Gross negligence’: popular Michigan river hit with second chemical spill in four years

PUBLISHED: 15 August 2022

The Guardian

The FBI and local officials are investigating the recent release of dangerous chemicals into Michigan’s Huron River, a 130-mile-long waterway that is popular for fishing and recreation and supplies drinking water for more than 100,000 people in Ann Arbor as well as other south-eastern Michigan communities. On 29 July, Tribar Manufacturing, a maker of exterior trim components for vehicles located in a western suburb of Detroit, discharged up to 10,000 gallons of waste containing hexavalent chromium, a known carcinogen, into a local sewer system on, according to Michigan’s department of environment, Great Lakes and energy, the state’s environmental regulatory agency. Click here to continue reading

 

Compare and Contrast: The impact of drought in England: water restrictions, fire risks and farming hardship

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

The Guardian

England is likely to be declared officially in drought on Friday, a move that will allow water companies to impose tough restrictions on water use as temperatures remain high across swathes of the UK. Hosepipe bans are likely to follow in areas that have not yet declared them, with people being urged to save water by not washing their cars, using lawn sprinklers or filling large pools. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Drought declared across eight areas of England

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

The Guardian

A drought has been declared across wide swathes of England after a meeting of experts. The prolonged dry conditions, with some areas of the country not receiving significant rainfall all summer, have caused the National Drought Group to declare an official drought. The Environment Agency has moved into drought in eight of its 14 areas: Devon and Cornwall, Solent and South Downs, Kent and south London, Herts and north London, East Anglia, Thames, Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire, and the east Midlands. Click here to continue reading

 

Epcor to add lead-reducing chemical to Edmonton’s water in 2023, two years behind schedule

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Edmonton Journal

Levels of lead in drinking water city-wide should begin dropping in early 2023 when orthophosphate is added at Edmonton’s water treatment plant, two years later than initially promised. Epcor announced Thursday the odourless, colourless chemical will be added to city water by early 2023. Orthophosphate creates a protective barrier inside a pipe to prevent lead from leaching into the water. Around 4,200 Edmonton homes are currently serviced by lead pipes owned by Epcor, the utility said. Click here to continue reading

Canada and Manitoba Invest in wastewater treatment and waste management infrastructure projects

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Water Canada

The Honourable Dan Vandal, Minister of Northern Affairs, Minister responsible for Prairies Economic Development Canada and Minister responsible for the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency and Member of Parliament for Saint Boniface—Saint Vital, on behalf of the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Infrastructure and Communities, and the Honourable Reg Helwer, Minister of Labour, Consumer Protection and Government Services, have announced more than $34.4 million in funding for 10 wastewater and waste management projects in Manitoba. Click here to continue reading

Study: Stormwater management ponds may not hold the solution for depleting wetlands

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Water Canada

Relying on stormwater management (SWM) ponds to restore the depleting wetlands is not sustainable and lacks the critical ecosystem services vital for biodiversity, a new study found. With the continued losses of wetlands projected in the near future and emphasis on the underestimation of provincial wetland loss, the study captures the contributions of SWM ponds in a changing network of water bodies and the effects of land use and land cover in this change. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Poland investigates catastrophic fish die-off

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Poland has deployed soldiers to help clean up the Oder River, which runs along the border with Germany, after 10 tons of dead fish surfaced from the waterway in what one official described as an “ecological catastrophe.” An association of fishers in Zielona Gora, a city in Western Poland, said Friday that it was suspending fishing in the river due to still−unconfirmed reports in the German media saying the river could be contaminated with mercury. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Europe’s drought dries up rivers, kills fish, shrivels crops

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Once, a river ran through it. Now, white dust and thousands of dead fish cover the wide trench that winds amid rows of trees in France’s Burgundy region in what was the Tille River in the village of Lux. From dry and cracked reservoirs in Spain to falling water levels on major arteries like the Danube, the Rhine and the Po, an unprecedented drought is afflicting nearly half of the European continent. It is damaging farm economies, forcing water restrictions, causing wildfires and threatening aquatic species. Click here to continue reading

25 cattle dead after water pump destroyed in southern Alberta

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

CTV News

A water pump was rammed into by a boat some time between Wednesday and Sunday just south of Raymond, resulting in the death of 25 cows. The cows were left without water for up to 48 hours before the destruction of the pump was discovered. It’s not known exactly what day the boat rammed into the pump. The rest of the surviving cows were quickly transported to a nearby reservoir to get them water they desperately needed. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: America’s summer of floods: climate crisis fueling barrage, scientists say

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

The Guardian

An entire building and roads washed away by raging waters in Yellowstone. People desperately swimming from their homes in St Louis. Dozens dead after torrential downpours in Kentucky. The summer of 2022 has been one of extreme floods in the US, with scientists warning the climate crisis is worsening the devastation. The deadliest of the recent barrage of floods, in Kentucky, was described as “heartbreaking” by Joe Biden as he surveyed ruined houses and inundated cars on Monday. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UK weather: drought expected to be declared in parts of England on Friday

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

The Guardian

An official drought could be declared for parts of England on Friday as rising temperatures and tinderbox conditions prompted the Met Office to issue its highest warning under its fire severity index. The National Drought Group – made up of civil servants, the Environment Agency, water companies and other groups including the National Farmers’ Union – is due to meet on Friday to discuss the longest dry spell since 1976. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘The new normal’: Why Europe is being hit by a climate-driven drought crisis

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Europe’s most severe drought in decades is hitting homes, factories, farmers and freight across the continent, as experts warn drier winters and searing summers fuelled by global heating mean water shortages will become “the new normal.” The EU European Drought Observatory has calculated that 45 per cent of the bloc’s territory was under drought warning by mid-July, with 15 per cent already on red alert, prompting the European Commission to warn of a “critical” situation in multiple regions. Click here to continue reading

Nova Scotia wants public to weigh in on fish farming as industry aims to expand in East Coast waters

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

As the aquaculture industry pushes for more salmon farming on the East Coast, public comment has opened for Nova Scotians to weigh in. The province hopes its review, which is already underway, will “identify ways to improve the regulations so they support the low-impact, sustainable growth of the aquaculture industry.” Changes will be implemented in 2023 or 2024. The public has until Sept. 6 to provide feedback, answering questions such as, “What factors are important to you in how aquaculture is regulated in Nova Scotia?” Click here to continue reading

Ontario nature organizations call on province, feds to protect Great Lakes

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Over 60 nature organizations in Ontario have signed a letter calling on both the federal and provincial governments to officially protect the Great Lakes. The Great Lakes are a key resource in Canada. They hold 84 per cent of North America’s freshwater, are home to thousands of species and support millions of people. It has been a long-standing Parks Canada goal to protect them, but only the Georgian Bay in Lake Huron and Lake Superior have been conserved thus far. Click here to continue reading

Metro Vancouver gets funding for heat recovery project

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Water Canada

Metro Vancouver has been granted funding for a heat recovery project at the Lulu Island Wastewater Treatment Plant. The project will recover heat from treated sewage for use in plant operations, while increasing renewable natural gas production. The project is receiving funding from the federal and provincial governments through the second intake of the CleanBC Communities Fund under the green infrastructure stream of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program. Click here to continue reading

Saskatoon exploring second water treatment plant to serve future population

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

Water Canada

Since it was established in 1906, Saskatoon’s Water Treatment Plant has been expanded to a treatment capacity of 250 million litres per day (MLD). The plant, along with reservoirs and pump stations, serve the city and several surrounding municipal and rural customers. The Water Treatment Long Term Capital Strategy will go before the City’s Standing Policy Committee on Environment, Utilities and Corporate Services. The report highlights the current and future steps needed to increase treatment capacity. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Swiss mountain pass will lose all glacier ice ‘in a few weeks’ for first time in centuries

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

The Guardian

The thick layer of ice that has covered a Swiss mountain pass for centuries will have melted away completely within a few weeks, according to a local ski resort. After a dry winter, the summer heatwaves hitting Europe have been catastrophic for the Alpine glaciers, which have been melting at an accelerated rate. The pass between Scex Rouge and Tsanfleuron has been iced over since at least the Roman era. Click here to continue reading

No environmental review for Alta. irrigation project

PUBLISHED: 12 August 2022

The Western Producer

The federal government is rejecting calls from several Alberta-based naturalist groups that seek an environmental assessment of reservoirs connected to the province’s nearly $1 billion irrigation modernization project. Part of that project would see work on four reservoirs connected to the massive upgrade — Chin and Snake Lake expansions as well as a new Deadhorse Coulee reservoir and a fourth, yet-to-be identified, project. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Water levels run low, farmland parched amid European drought

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

CBC News

Water levels in rivers, lakes and reservoirs across western Europe are running low, or even dry, amid the most severe drought in decades, putting stress on drinking water supplies, hampering river freight and tourism and threatening crop yields. The Doubs River should flow through a forested canyon and cascade over waterfalls before spilling out into Brenets Lake, a draw for tourists in eastern France’s Jura region. But after months without meaningful rain, the river water has receded up the canyon and sluggishly reaches the lake in a narrow channel. Click here to continue reading

Alberta farmers hope for more rain as heat wave blankets province

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

CBC News

While Alberta farmers are optimistic about their crops this year thanks to the incessant rainfall earlier in the summer, they hope the current heat wave doesn’t last much longer. Alberta farmers suffered through a devastating drought last year. The heat dome that dried out crops led to record amounts of insurance claims. Recent heat warnings in parts of southern Alberta saw temperatures reach 35 C. Click here to continue reading

 

 

Compare and Contrast: Can citizen scientists turn the tide against America’s toxic algal blooms?

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

The Guardian

As ocean surface waters are forecast to continue to warm, potentially larger and more dangerous red tide events loom as well as blooms of other types of harmful algae. Toxic blooms have been seen in Australia, South Africa and Japan, and coastal regions around the world now face the risk of “unprecedented diversity and frequency” of these events, according to the US National Office for Harmful Algal Blooms. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: No hosepipe ban at No 10, as ministers call for water restrictions

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

The Guardian

Downing Street has no plan to put a hosepipe ban in place in and around the prime minister’s residence, the Guardian can reveal, despite ministers calling for water companies to enforce restrictions. Thames Water, which supplies No 10, said on Tuesday it would be putting water rationing in place in the coming weeks due to the extended dry conditions. Click here to continue reading

SCG Process launches emergency water distribution units to support municipal emergency and risk management planning

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

Water Canada

SCG Process, a leading provider of industrial pumps, packaged water treatment plants, and chemical feed packages, announced the launch of mobile Emergency Water Distribution Units™ (EWDU) to support municipal emergency response and risk management planning for natural disasters including earthquakes, forest fires, tornados and hurricanes. Click here to continue reading

Fishers and conservationists jubilant over large salmon returns to B.C.

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The summer of 2022 is shaping up to be a bumper season for both pink and sockeye salmon in British Columbia rivers, with one veteran Indigenous fisherman reporting the biggest catches of sockeye in decades. The strong run comes two years after the closure of two open-net Atlantic salmon farms in the area. Click here to continue reading

Common weed may be ‘super plant’ that holds key to drought-resistant crops

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

Science Daily

A common weed harbors important clues about how to create drought resistant crops in a world beset by climate change. Yale scientists describe how Portulaca oleracea, commonly known as purslane, integrates two distinct metabolic pathways to create a novel type of photosynthesis that enables the weed to endure drought while remaining highly productive, they report August 5 in the journal Science Advances. Click here to continue reading

Researchers show potential for improved water-use efficiency in field-grown plants

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

Science Daily

Water deficit is currently one of the most significant limiting factors for global agricultural productivity, a factor further exacerbated by global climate change according to a 2019 water report from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. As a result, researchers worldwide have been working to improve water-use efficiency in crops to better cope with water-scarce conditions. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UK braced for drought conditions to last until October

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

The Guardian

The UK is braced for drought conditions until October, with rivers forecast to be low and exceptionally low in central and southern England, according to the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. This could have dire consequences for farming, as soil in much of the country is too dry to drill, and many crops for harvest next year and the end of this year need to be drilled by the end of October to be viable. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Thames Water to introduce hosepipe ban ‘in coming weeks’

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

The Guardian

Fifteen million more people are to be hit with a hosepipe ban in London and the surrounding areas, as Thames Water has announced measures will be introduced “in coming weeks”. These bans could come across the country, including in the north-east. Leaked Environment Agency documents seen by the Guardian show that Yorkshire Water, Severn Trent and South West Water are among companies are applying for drought permits, which would allow them to put bans in place. Click here to continue reading

Centralized water and wastewater operator training at Yukon University to benefit First Nations and operators in the region

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

Water Canada

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) and Yukon University have announced a new program delivery model to enhance water and wastewater operator training and support in the region. This year, Yukon University has started to deliver ISC’s Circuit Rider Training Program (CRTP) for First Nations water and wastewater systems operators, in addition to its existing role in delivering the Yukon Water and Wastewater Operator Program (YWWOP), which is open to all operators in the region. Click here to continue reading

State of the Great Lakes 2022 Report and 2022 Progress Report of the Parties showing continuing restoration of the Great Lakes

PUBLISHED: 10 August 2022

Water Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada and the United States Environmental Protection Agency jointly recently published two reports required under the Agreement: the State of the Great Lakes 2022 Report and the 2022 Progress Report of the Parties. Fifty years ago, Canada and the United States first signed the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, a commitment to work together to restore and protect our shared and increasingly precious resource. Since 1972, the Agreement has been a catalyst for strong regional partnerships and innovative approaches to environmental actions. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Source of River Thames dries out ‘for first time’ during drought

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

The Guardian

The source of the Thames has dried up during the drought, with river experts saying it is the first time they have seen it happen while forecasters warn of further high temperatures to come. The river’s source has shifted from its official start point outside Cirencester during the continuing dry weather and is now more than 5 miles (8km) downstream. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: New study calculates retreat of glacier edges in Alaska’s Kenai Fjords National Park

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

Science Daily

As glaciers worldwide retreat due to climate change, managers of national parks need to know what’s on the horizon to prepare for the future. A new study has measured 38 years of change for glaciers in Kenai Fjords National Park south of Anchorage and discovered that 13 of the 19 glaciers show substantial retreat, four are relatively stable, and two have advanced. It also finds trends in which glacier types are disappearing fastest. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: France facing ‘most severe drought’ in its history, PM says

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

CBC News

Weather forecasts suggest that the heat, which increases evaporation and water needs, could continue for the next 15 days, possibly making the situation even more worrying, the statement stressed. The government’s crisis unit will be in charge of monitoring the situation in the hardest-hit areas and will co-ordinate measures like bringing drinking water to some places. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flash floods strand 1,000 people in Death Valley National Park

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Flash flooding at Death Valley National Park triggered by heavy rainfall on Friday buried cars, forced officials to close all roads in and out the park and stranded about 1,000 people, officials said. The park near the California-Nevada state line received at least 4.3 centimetres of rain at the Furnace Creek area, which park officials in a statement said represented “nearly an entire year’s worth of rain in one morning.” The park’s average annual rainfall is 4.8 centimetres. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Spider crabs swarm Cornish beaches as sea temperatures rise

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

The Guardian

Thousands of spider crabs have converged on the beaches of Cornwall due to rising sea temperatures caused by the climate crisis. The migratory creatures swarmed in the shallow water in St Ives, shedding their shells before returning to depths of up to 300ft. The crustaceans are instantly recognisable for their long legs and pincers, but they are harmless to humans. However, their presence at Porthgwidden beach was enough to put many bathers off entering the sea. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Second World War bomb revealed in drought-hit Italy’s River Po

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

CBC News

Heat waves sweeping Europe this summer have brought not just record high temperatures and scorched fields: The drought-stricken waters of Italy’s River Po are running so low they revealed a previously submerged World War Two bomb. Military experts defused and carried out a controlled explosion on Sunday of the 450-kilogram bomb, which was discovered on July 25 near the northern village of Borgo Virgilio, close to the city of Mantua. Click here to continue reading

Iona Island Wastewater Treatment Plant Biosolids Dewatering Facility complete

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

Water Canada

The Biosolids Dewatering Facility at Iona Island Wastewater Treatment Plant is fully enclosed and has stringent odour controls. It will mechanically dry the solids left after primary wastewater treatment, turning them into beneficial biosolids. At the facility’s loading bay, dried biosolids will be put directly into trucks so land that was previously used for biosolids drying and storage can be reclaimed for plant construction and ecological restoration projects. Click here to continue reading

Bishop Water joins Hamilton, ON’s Chedoke Creek cleanup

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

Water Canada

Bishop Water will be joining a team of environmental remediation specialists, that includes Milestone Environmental Contracting Inc. and ECO Technologies Ltd., to complete the targeted dredging of Chedoke Creek in Hamilton, Ontario. The project, scheduled to start late this summer, aims to remove over 10,000 cubic metres of nutrient-rich contaminated sediments from a 19,000m2 section of the creek. Click here to continue reading

Discovery of ‘young’ deep groundwater tells surprising tale: USask researcher

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

Water Canada

The findings of a recently published study of ancient groundwaters have important implications for such practices as carbon sequestration and deep underground storage of waste from nuclear power and oil and gas production, says University of Saskatchewan (USask) researcher Dr. Grant Ferguson (PhD). Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Burst water main in north London causes anger amid drought crisis

PUBLISHED: 08 August 2022

The Guardian

Thames Water is facing criticism and anger from customers after one of its water mains burst, causing street flooding at the height of a drought crisis. The burst 91cm (36in) water main prompted many road closures around Hornsey Road, north London, as video of the incident showed streets submerged in more than a metre of water. About 50 properties were damaged, four people were rescued, a sports centre was closed because of flooding and thousands of households were left without water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Choppy waters ahead for offshore wind

PUBLISHED: 05 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

When it’s completed, Norway’s Hywind Tampen will be the world’s largest floating offshore wind farm. Compared with most wind farms — even other offshore wind farms — the Hywind Tampen is unusual: the 88-megawatt operation is located farther out to sea than almost any other wind farm to date. Floating 140 kilometres offshore, the turbines will sit in water between 260 and 300 metres deep. Research shows how water flowing past the submerged element of a wind turbine, such as the cables that keep it affixed to the seafloor, creates turbulence that pushes the water up and down and mixes the layers. If the added turbulence kicks up too many nutrients from the bottom to the higher layers, phytoplankton could use up the nutrients too quickly. Click here to continue reading

Reflections on the extraordinary power of slow water

PUBLISHED: 05 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The advance of the climate crisis, marked by its extremes — droughts or deluges, fires or floods — makes abundantly clear the human habit of trying to contain and control water isn’t working. For her new book, Water Always Wins, National Geographic Explorer Erica Gies criss-crossed the globe, witnessing some of the unanticipated results of modern society’s preference for engineered solutions. Click here to continue reading

Canada invests next phase of the Oceans Protection Plan

PUBLISHED: 05 August 2022

Water Canada

The Minister of Transport, the Honourable Omar Alghabra, and the Member of Parliament for Saint John—Rothesay, Wayne Long, have announced an investment of up to $447 million to further protect and restore coastal ecosystems across Canada, as part of the next phase of Canada’s Oceans Protection Plan. Since its launch in 2016, Canada’s Oceans Protection Plan has increased protections for our marine ecosystems and species, including the restoration of 60 marine ecosystems nationally. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Incredibly promising’: the bubble barrier extracting plastic from a Dutch river

PUBLISHED: 05 August 2022

The Guardian

Five years ago, Claar-els van Delft began to suspect that plastic waste on the beach at Katwijk in the Netherlands did not come from visitors, or the sea, but from the mouth of a nearby river. Sure enough, when volunteers sifted through an oil drum full of Oude Rijn river water, in between the duckweed they saw tiny plastic particles. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Tracking nitrogen pollution

PUBLISHED: 05 August 2022

ScienceDaily

Tropical coastal ecosystems are among the most biodiverse areas on Earth. And they’re also on the front lines of effects caused by human activity. That’s why it’s becoming increasingly important, especially as human populations increase, to manage the impacts of runoff and wastewater that flow into the sea. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Low water levels mean Rhine is days from being shut for cargo

PUBLISHED: 05 August 2022

The Guardian

Germany’s Rhine, one of Europe’s key waterways, is just days away from being closed to commercial traffic because of very low levels caused by drought, authorities and industry have warned. Crucially, the impending crisis could lead energy companies to cut their output, one of the country’s biggest gas companies has said. Businesses located along the Rhine or dependent on it to transport or receive goods are warning that they have been forced to scale back activities and reduce loads drastically – and are now on the verge of having to close some production if cargo ships are no longer able to access the river. Click here to continue reading

Nanaimo breaks ground on Midtown Water Supply Project

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

Water Canada

Construction for the City’s Midtown Water Supply Project began on Monday, July 25, 2022. This multi-year project will see the construction of two large water supply mains, providing an essential water supply service to central and north Nanaimo, including Nanaimo Regional General Hospital (NRGH). This project will strengthen the City’s water supply to accommodate future growth, provide assurance of fire protection and ensure resiliency for decades to come. Click here to continue reading

Transport Canada lets chance to regulate cruise ships’ acidic wastewater sail by

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Transport Canada planned to crack down on the cruise ship industry’s biggest source of pollution earlier this year, but that type of wastewater was missing when the department released new regulations. In an internal memo obtained by Canada’s National Observer through an access-to-information request, the department said it would develop rules that focus on “the discharge of greywater, sewage, and scrubber washwater” — a type of pollution produced by cleaning systems that keep exhaust from heavy fuel oil that’s laden with heavy metals, sulfur dioxide, carcinogens and harmful pollutants out of the air. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: How the River Thames came back from the dead

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Around 200 years ago, during the Industrial Revolution, London’s River Thames was both a hub of trade and transport and a dumping ground for human excretion and industrial waste. The cradle of England’s industrial heritage was quickly becoming a glorified sewer. The stench was so unbearable during the sweltering summer of 1858 that it forced some government offices on the riverbank to close. That summer earned the nickname “the Great Stink.” Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Emergency water plant in London unusable despite drought risk

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

The Guardian 

A £250m desalination plant launched 12 years ago to increase drinking supplies during long dry spells has been put on hold, as water companies in England and Wales face growing political pressure over their management of the supply crisis. The Thames Water plant at Beckton, east London, opened in 2010 with plans to supply up to 1 million people during emergencies, but that ambition has been scaled back amid doubts as to when the facility can begin operating. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘We feel disrespected’: Navajo farmers wait for justice years after EPA disaster

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

The Guardian

On 7 August 2015, crews from the Navajo Nation irrigation office in Shiprock rushed to close the main gates of two irrigation canals that carry water from the San Juan River toward the fields of hundreds of Navajo farmers. It was peak growing season in the arid north-western corner of New Mexico. About 12,000 acres of crops had been planted. And a disaster was threatening all of them. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Magnificent’ jellyfish found off coast of Papua New Guinea sparks interest among researchers

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

The Guardian

A diver has captured footage of an unusual-looking jellyfish off the coast of Papua New Guinea, sparking interest among researchers. The video was captured by Dorian Borcherds, who owns Scuba Ventures in Kavieng, in the New Ireland province of PNG. Borcherds, who has been diving in the area for more than two decades, said he saw about three or four of the jellyfish and was struck by their intricate detail and the way they seemed to move decisively through the water. Click here to continue reading

Researcher says Canada’s ‘largest documented hailstone’ fell Monday in Alberta

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

Global News

Environment and Climate Change Canada said Wednesday that the pieces of hail that fell in central Alberta ranged from the size of peas, dimes, nickels, golf balls, hen eggs, tennis balls, baseballs and softballs. The Innisfail, Pine Lake, Condor, Rimbey and Ferrier areas were all hit, the agency said. Click here to continue reading

Climate change means Alberta could see more large hail events in the future. Here’s why

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

CBC News

Southern Alberta lived up to its nickname of Canada’s “hail alley” this week when an intense thunderstorm brought down hail the size of softballs, shattering windows and denting roofs of dozens of vehicles on the QEII near Red Deer Monday. And while large hail events are not uncommon in the province, experts warn that severe storms producing large hail could happen more frequently because of climate change. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Water firms resist government calls for more hosepipe bans

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

The Guardian

Water companies are in a standoff with the government over hosepipe bans as they resist bringing in restrictions despite growing concerns about rivers running dry and the prospect of drought in England and Wales. The decision to restrict water usage is made by individual water companies, which are advised by the government and charities as part of the National Drought Group. Click here to continue reading

Climate change is warming Canada’s great expanse of boreal forest, bringing greater risk of fire and disease

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

CBC News

When the mercury climbs, evaporation happens more readily and plants lose water at a high rate through transpiration. When it is not replaced, we start to get into moisture deficits. And the longer those deficits last, the more stress they put on our plants. Click here to continue reading

‘It sounded like bombs’: Hailstorm damages dozens of cars on Alta. highway

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

CTV News

Monday night, Gibran Marquez made a phone call he never wants to make again. Marquez was one of many people trapped in a hail storm on Monday evening near Red Deer, Alta., which left dozens of vehicles damaged and drivers and passengers bruised and confused along the side of the QEII highway. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Citing the climate ‘crisis,’ Harris announces $1B for floods, storms

PUBLISHED: 04 August 2022

Canada’s National Observer 

Vice President Kamala Harris called climate change an “immediate” and “urgent” crisis Monday as she detailed more than $1 billion in federal spending to respond to disasters such as deadly flooding in Kentucky and wildfires ravaging her home state of California. On a visit to Miami, Harris announced a series of grants being made available to states to help communities across the nation prepare for and respond to climate−related disasters. Click here to continue reading

Canada and Nunavut invest in water and wastewater treatment for northern communities

PUBLISHED: 03 August 2022

Water Canada

With this investment, several planning studies will be undertaken at the Rankin Inlet Wastewater Treatment Plant to identify future projects to bolster capacity at the plant. This project is a key step in increasing the facility’s ability to treat and manage wastewater in the community. In addition, funding will be used to conduct studies investigating the potential for five new water treatment facilities to be located in Arctic Bay, Grise Fiord, Pond Inlet, Rankin Inlet and Sanikiluaq. This investment will support future projects that would increase access to potable water within these communities. Click here to continue reading

New Invest Vancouver report reveals untapped potential in water tech for regional economy

PUBLISHED: 03 August 2022

Water Canada

A new Invest Vancouver report reveals that water tech, a hidden gem of the clean tech sector, provides an untapped economic opportunity for the Metro Vancouver region, serving a multi-billion dollar global market. Water tech encompasses technology that mitigates risk for utilities, industrial water users, and households while producing benefits such as lower carbon intensity, more efficient use of resources, and reduced environmental impact — including fewer pollutants and less waste. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: South East Water announces hosepipe ban for Kent and Sussex

PUBLISHED: 03 August 2022

The Guardian

Three million people in the UK will be under a hosepipe ban this month after Kent and Sussex announced emergency drought measures. South East Water said it had “no choice” but to restrict the use of water in its area from 12 August, citing demand this summer breaking “all previous records” amid extreme dry conditions. Last week, Southern Water announced that just under a million people in Hampshire and on the Isle of Wight would be under the same ban from this Friday, because rivers in the area were running dangerously dry. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Seawalls ease property owners’ fears of erosion – but not for their neighbors

PUBLISHED: 03 August 2022

The Guardian

Six years ago, David Spector bought an 80-year-old house perched on a 120ft bluff, with a panoramic view of Lake Michigan. But that priceless view may end up costing Spector more than he could have imagined. His house, located about 20 miles outside of Milwaukee, sits in a particularly bad spot for erosion, with wind and waves whittling away at the base of the bluff. Ten years ago, the house stood 50ft away from the bluff’s edge. Today it’s less than 10ft away. Spector knows it’s only a matter of time until the bluff gives way and his home will be gone. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: At least 24 people dead as flash flooding hits eastern Uganda

PUBLISHED: 03 August 2022

The Guardian

At least 24 people have died and more than 5,600 people have been displaced by flash flooding in eastern Uganda. Two rivers burst their banks after heavy rainfall swept through the city of Mbale over the weekend, submerging homes, shops and roads, and uprooting water pipes. About 400,000 people have been left without clean water, and more than 2,000 hectares (5,000 acres) of crops have been destroyed. Click here to continue reading

Expansion of Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area complete

PUBLISHED: 03 August 2022

Water Canada

The narrow strip of 33 hectares (ha) that once divided this ecologically sensitive area has officially been designated as part of the NWA. The expansion includes a connecting portion of wetland system with high biodiversity value, swamp and meadow marsh, as well as marshland and open water. The full wetland system will now be protected, improving connectivity for wildlife populations and allowing wildlife to move more freely in this area. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: South Huron Valley Utility Authority implements Lystek THP® technology for sustainable biosolids treatment

PUBLISHED: 03 August 2022

Water Canada

The South Huron Valley Utility Authority (SHVUA, “the Authority”) has successfully implemented Lystek International’s (Lystek) award-winning Thermal Hydrolysis Solution, Lystek THP®, to enhance the biosolids management program at the South Huron Valley Wastewater Treatment Plant (SHV WWTP) located in Brownstown Township, Michigan. This project commenced in the Fall of 2020 and was commissioned in March 2022. Click here to continue reading

‘Beautifully quiet’: RiverWatch launches Eco Floats tours through Edmonton’s downtown

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

Edmonton Journal

The 2.5-hour Eco Floats, funded by Epcor, take people on a 12.5-kilometre tour that floats under nine city bridges. The new 2022 route starts at the Laurier Park Boat Launch and ends at Dawson Park. The tour is being offered every Wednesday to Sunday this August by the RiverWatch Institute of Alberta. As the raft passes some Edmonton landmarks, the tour guides will educate riders on the history of the city and the river, and will point out some parks and buildings of significance located on the route. Rafters will be asked to paddle periodically throughout the tour and will pass some well-known spots such as Accidental Beach. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: US drafts new speed limits on shipping to help save endangered whales

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

The Guardian

Vessels off the US east coast must slow down more often to help save a vanishing species of whale from extinction, the federal government said. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration made the announcement via new proposed rules designed to prevent ships colliding with North Atlantic right whales. Vessel strikes and entanglement in fishing gear are the two biggest threats to the giant animals, which number fewer than 340 and are falling in population. Click here to continue reading

‘Drownings are preventable,’ so this Elgin County coalition is working to fill water-safety gaps

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

CBC News

With lifeguards in short supply and the pandemic limiting swim lessons, a new drowning-prevention group in Ontario is looking to educate people heading to beaches about water safety. Across Ontario, 51 people have drowned this year, according to the Lifesaving Society. Risk factors include are being a weak or non-swimmer, not wearing a flotation device, swimming alone or alcohol consumption, according to the Lifesaving Society’s 2020 drowning report. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘We had to swim out’: Kentucky grapples with floods as search for survivors continues

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

The Guardian

As the hunt for survivors goes on in Kentucky after a torrential storm dumped 10 inches of rain in a matter of hours, tales of rescue and tragedy are beginning to emerge from the wreckage of the natural disaster. The region, parts of which remain cut off from power and cellphone service, has recorded 25 people dead with the death toll likely to rise in the coming days as the costs in life and property damage from the flash flooding are compiled. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Act now on water or face emergency queues on the streets, UK warned

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

The Guardian

A national hosepipe ban should be implemented as a national priority along with compulsory water metering across the UK by the end of the decade. That is the key message that infrastructure advisers have given the government as the nation braces itself for a drought that is threatening major disruption to the nation. Failure to act now would leave Britain facing a future of queueing for emergency bottled water “from the back of lorries”. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘People are worried it will happen again’: the English village whose water ran out

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

The Guardian

John Ramsden surveyed the parched village green, its yellow grass withered in the midday sun, and wondered what lay ahead. “People are worried it’ll happen again.” The “again” refers to life without a water supply. Ramsden’s village of Challock, perched in the uplands of the Kent downs, has already survived one bout without mains water this summer. For six days earlier this month, its taps largely ran dry, forcing its school to close. Challock’s village hall was converted into an emergency centre for distributing bottled water. And even that, residents say, ran out. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Lake Mead: shrinking waters uncover buried secrets and grisly finds

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

The Guardian

Drought has a way of revealing things. Receding waters can highlight the precarity of the crucial systems that keep societies functioning and expose hidden ancient cities. In the case of Lake Mead, America’s largest reservoir, diminishing waters have in recent months uncovered long buried secrets and other mysterious finds: at least three sets of human remains, including a body inside a barrel that could be linked to a mob killing, and a sunken boat dating back to the second world war. Click here to continue reading

Heatwaves put classic Alpine hiking routes off-limits

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

The Guardian

Little snow cover and glaciers melting at an alarming rate in Europe’s heatwaves have put some classic Alpine hiking routes off-limits. Usually at the height of summer tourists flock to the Alps and seek out well-trodden paths up to some of its peaks. But with warmer temperatures – which scientists say are driven by climate change – speeding up glacier melt and thawing permafrost, routes that are usually safe at this time of year now face hazards such as falling rocks released from the ice. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Yellowstone Park feels the love after historic flooding

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

CBC Radio

Tourists are once again flocking to famed Yellowstone National Park after flooding shut the iconic location down earlier this summer. Crowds are returning to hike more than 1,600 kilometres worth of trails, catch a glimpse of the bison, elk and bears, and show their love for a location synonymous with outdoor adventure. Both at home, in Canada, and around the world, our passion for parks has only grown during the pandemic. The CBC Radio special For the Love of Parks explores the effects our green spaces have on us and the effect we have on them. Click here to continue reading

Kedgwick, NB to get improved drinking water and stormwater management infrastructure

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

Water Canada

Funding will go towards the replacement of water and sewer service pipes on Notre-Dame Street from the intersection of rue des Montagnes to Saint Jean Baptiste Street, as well as the installation of a new storm sewer line to separate sanitary sewer collection service. The project will eliminate boil water advisories caused by emergency work and reduce the overflow of stormwater into the sanitary system. The improvements will help provide more reliable services to residents and protect the environment. The roadway will also be rebuilt with new concrete curbs and sidewalks. Click here to continue reading

Untreated wastewater again being released into harbour, Halifax Water says

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

CBC News

Halifax Water is again asking people to stay away from Halifax harbour and flush less. In a news release Sunday night, the utility said a wastewater pump failure is causing “screened but untreated” wastewater to be released into the harbour. This comes just over a week after the utility said its Duffus Street wastewater pump had returned to normal operations after another failure caused untreated wastewater and stormwater to flow into the harbour. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Satellite images reveal shrinkage of Utah’s Great Salt Lake

PUBLISHED: 02 August 2022

The Guardian

New satellite images from the European Space Agency have illustrated the extent of dwindling water levels in the Great Salt Lake in Utah, a month after it reached its lowest water level ever recorded. Highlighting falling water levels and the decreasing size of the lake, the report compares satellite images from 1985 and 2022. At its peak in the 1980s, it covered about 8,550 sq km (3,300 sq miles); in recent measurements, it has lost nearly half of its surface area from the historical average. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: At least 16 people dead after flash flooding in Kentucky

PUBLISHED: 30 July 2022

The Guardian

At least 16 people have died in widespread flash flooding in Kentucky, including families with children, a toll the authorities expect to rise on Friday as extreme weather hits several states. Search and rescue teams backed by the national guard are searching for people missing in the record floods that have wiped out entire towns in some of the poorest places in America. Click here to continue reading

Alberta gets funding for water infrastructure projects across the province

PUBLISHED: 30 July 2022

Water Canada

More than $58.7 million from the Water for Life and the Alberta Municipal Water/Wastewater Partnership (AMWWP) grant programs will support 33 water infrastructure projects across the province. The projects will improve water and wastewater services and access to clean drinking water for rural communities and are expected to create 824 jobs during construction. Click here to continue reading

Research: Better estimating the risk of coastal flooding for nuclear power plants

PUBLISHED: 30 July 2022

Water Canada

Coastal facilities around the world must be designed to be protected against extreme sea levels. However, according to a team of Quebecois and French researchers from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), and the Université Gustave Eiffel, current estimates of coastal flood risks contain biases. The scientists therefore came up with a methodology that allows historical data to be used more efficiently and optimally. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: As waters warm, Alaska witnesses salmon booms and busts

PUBLISHED: 30 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer 

There are five kinds of salmon in Alaska: chinook, sockeye, chum, coho and pink. Chum is the most harvested fish on the Yukon, but both chum and chinook are crucial to the lives and culture of the roughly 50 communities around Alaska that rely on the river and its tributaries for subsistence. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: How climate change is melting the Alps’ glaciers – in pictures

PUBLISHED: 30 July 2022

The Guardian

Most of the world’s mountain glaciers are retreating because of the climate crisis, but those in the European Alps are especially vulnerable. Smaller and with less ice cover, this year they are on track for their highest loss of mass in at least 60 years of record keeping. Click here to continue reading

Preparations begin for Sunshine Coast Regional District’s wastewater treatment plant system upgrades

PUBLISHED: 28 July 2022

Water Canada

Patrick Weiler, Member of Parliament for West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-Sea to Sky Country, on behalf of the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Infrastructure and Communities, and Sunshine Coast Regional District Board Chair Darnelda Siegers, have highlighted a federal investment of $461,400 and a Provincial investment of $307,600 to complete upgrades to the Woodcreek Park Wastewater Treatment Plant System in Sunshine Coast Regional District. Click here to continue reading

Government of Canada designates Big Glace Bay Lake as national wildlife area

PUBLISHED: 28 July 2022

Water Canada 

The Honourable Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, has announced that the Government of Canada has designated Big Glace Bay Lake as Canada’s newest National Wildlife Area. The newly designated National Wildlife Area (NWA) in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, comprises 392 hectares of estuary and marsh waters enclosed by a barrier beach. The site also includes mixed woodland, shallow coastal water, and eelgrass flats and encompasses the Big Glace Bay Lake Migratory Bird Sanctuary (MBS) plus an additional 14 hectares. Click here to continue reading

City water restrictions remain in effect

PUBLISHED: 28 July 2022

Wetaskiwin Times

Stage 1 water restrictions are still in effect. Engineers have assessed the reservoir and will have a cleanup plan in place as soon as possible. Updates will now be made as information becomes available. Updates will be provided by the City through the City’s website and social media channels. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: People in England urged to curb water use amid driest conditions since 1976

PUBLISHED: 27 July 2022

The Guardian

People in England are being urged to curb their use of water as the country faces its driest conditions since 1976. Officials are preparing to declare a drought in August if dry conditions continue, after months of very low rainfall in the UK. Farmers are set to be told not to irrigate fields, causing fears of crop failure, and people are likely to face local hosepipe bans. Reservoirs are at record lows in some parts of the country, where rain has been below average for months. Click here to continue reading

Could fish poop help corals recover from bleaching?

PUBLISHED: 27 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

It’s relatively well known that most fully functioning corals one finds dotting colourful coral reefs are a symbiosis between a coral (the animal itself) and the microscopic algae that dwell within it. This duo forms the physical foundation of coral reefs, where one-fourth of Earth’s marine species reside. But what is much less well known is how corals get their algal partners. Click here to continue reading

Research: Water resources to become less predictable with climate change

PUBLISHED: 27 July 2022

Water Canada

Water resources will fluctuate increasingly and become more and more difficult to predict in snow-dominated regions across the Northern Hemisphere by later this century, according to a comprehensive new climate change study led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The research team found that, even in regions that keep receiving about the same amount of precipitation, streamflow will become more variable and unpredictable. As snowpack recedes in a warmer future and fails to provide reliable runoff, the amount and timing of water resources will become increasingly reliant on periodic episodes of rain. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Scientists find 30 potential new species at bottom of ocean

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

The Guardian

Scientists have found more than 30 potentially new species living at the bottom of the sea. Researchers from the UK’s Natural History Museum used a remotely operated vehicle to collect specimens from the abyssal plains of the Clarion-Clipperton Zone in the central Pacific. Previously, creatures from this area had been studied only from photographs. Click here to continue reading

Investments in water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure for Avalon Peninsula

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

Water Canada

In St. John’s, new wastewater infrastructure will improve municipal services in the Goulds area and help protect Shoal Bay and the harbour. In addition, residents of Petty Harbour-Maddox Cove will have access to more reliable water infrastructure through ditching and erosion control measures along the Motion Bay Road extension. Investing in water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure is critical for the growth and health of our cities and environment. These projects will protect our waterways and help our communities continue to provide safe and reliable services for families, businesses and visitors alike. Click here to continue reading

Ovivo acquires industrial wastewater solutions provider Wastech Controls & Engineering

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

Water Canada

Ovivo Inc. (“Ovivo”), a global provider of water and wastewater treatment equipment, technology and systems, is pleased to announce the acquisition of Wastech Controls & Engineering, LLC (“Wastech”). Founded in 1987 by Mr. Paul Nicolas and located in Chatsworth, California, Wastech has become a nationally recognized process system integrator, offering complete facility equipment design and manufacturing, after-sale support and automation solutions in the areas of chemical handling, water and wastewater treatment. Click here to continue reading

How heat waves and urchins stress out kelp forests

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Marine heat waves are becoming a major threat to key coastal habitats. The longest marine heat wave on record, known as the Blob, hit the northeast Pacific Ocean between 2013 and 2016. Ever since, scientists have been working to unravel its effects, which include killing thousands of birds, bolstering jellyfish numbers, and spurring the proliferation of harmful algae that poisoned marine mammals. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Melting glacier in Alps shifts border between Switzerland and Italy

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

The Guardian

A melting glacier in the Alps has shifted the border between Switzerland and Italy, putting the location of an Italian mountain lodge in dispute. The borderline runs along a drainage divide – the point at which meltwater will run down either side of the mountain towards one country or the other. But the Theodul Glacier’s retreat means the watershed has crept towards the Rifugio Guide del Cervino, a refuge for visitors near the 3,480-metre (11,417ft) Testa Grigia peak – and it is gradually sweeping underneath the building. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Rio Grande runs dry in Albuquerque for the first time in 40 years

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

Washington Post 

A stretch of the Rio Grande near Albuquerque that supplies farmers with water and a habitat for an array of aquatic life is drying — an unsettling sighting of climate change’s effects in a populous U.S. city. As the summer’s hotter and drier weather has fueled drought and fire throughout the West, federal and local agencies are salvaging what they can along a 100-mile section of the river: rationing the water for 66,000 acres of agricultural land and rescuing silvery minnows stranded in the remaining puddles of water. Click here to continue reading

Federal Flood Mapping Guidelines Series

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

Public Safety Canada

In consultation with provincial and territorial partners and key stakeholders, the federal government has developed new documents in the Federal Flood Mapping Guidelines Series. These are a series of evergreen guidelines that will help advance flood mapping activities across Canada. The publication of these documents will contribute to better addressing overland flooding – Canada’s costliest hazard – by strengthening flood mapping across the country. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UK facing drought in August following extreme heat

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

The Guardian

The UK is facing the prospect of a drought being declared in August, experts have said, warning of potential crop failures after a period of remarkably dry weather and extreme heat. Hosepipe bans for households could be brought in across the UK and farmers could be restricted from irrigating their crops if the government implements a drought plan. Click here to continue reading

Nature-based healing: Wetland conservation for healthy lakes

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

Water Canada

Lake Erie in southwestern Ontario is one of three chronically sick Canadian lakes that are monitored by satellite for EOLakeWatch, the Government of Canada’s algal bloom reporting system. It’s a relatively shallow lake that receives high levels of nutrients, washed away from mainly non-point sources such as fields and lawns. Every year, Lake Erie coughs up harmful blooms that threaten the drinking water of 12 million people in Canada and the United States. Click here to continue reading

Delivering clean oceans and healthy coasts with an expanded Oceans Protection Plan

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

Water Canada

Since its launch in 2016, the Oceans Protection Plan has strengthened protections for our coasts and wildlife, improved marine traffic and incident management, and advanced partnerships with Indigenous communities. Click here to continue reading

Watercraft inspection at Wabamun Lake helps keep invasive species out of the water

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

Global News

The Watercraft Inspections Program set up a station at Wabamun Lake, Alta. on Saturday, looking for any potentially invasive species — particularly zebra and quagga mussels. Officials say there are currently no invasive mussels in Alberta, B.C. or Saskatchewan, and they want to keep it that way. Click here to continue reading

Cleansing stations to be added at Lac Ste. Anne to deal with blue-green algae

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

CTV News

Organizers of the Lac Ste. Anne pilgrimage say cleansing stations are to be provided for anyone who wants to enter the lake next week. Alberta Health Services issued a blue-green algae bloom advisory for the lake Thursday afternoon. It comes just days before the Pope is set to visit the lake and kick off the pilgrimage at the site west of Edmonton. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flash flooding kills at least 21 people in southern Iran

PUBLISHED: 26 July 2022

CBC News

Flash floods in Iran’s drought-stricken southern Fars province have killed at least 21 people, state television said Saturday. Heavy rains swelled the Roudbal river by the city of Estahban, according to the city’s governor, Yousef Karegar. Karegar said rescue teams had saved 55 people who were trapped by the flash flooding, but at least six people were still missing. Click here to continue reading

West Coast infrastructure is on the rise to stem the wave of ocean plastics

PUBLISHED: 23 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Coastal community cleanup groups on eastern Vancouver Island have been itching for the opening of B.C.’s newest ocean debris recycling depot. The Cumberland site, operated by Comox Strathcona Waste Management (CSWM) in partnership with the Ocean Legacy Foundation, opened in mid-June to tackle the tonnes of plastic washing ashore in the region, said Stephanie Valdal, CSWM’s waste management services co-ordinator. Click here to continue reading

Blue-green algae advisory issued for Lac Ste. Anne days before Pope Francis visit

PUBLISHED: 22 July 2022

Global News

Just days before a small Alberta lake community is set to be inundated with people from around the world, a health advisory has been issued for the body of water Pope Francis is set to visit. On Thursday, Alberta Health Services issued a blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) advisory for Lac Ste. Anne. The pope is set to visit the lake northwest of Edmonton next Tuesday, although he is not expected to enter the water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Dry rivers compound water crisis, stressing food and energy supplies

PUBLISHED: 22 July 2022

CBC News

Click here to continue reading

PSA: City encourages residents to have a waterwise summer

PUBLISHED: 22 July 2022

City of Calgary 

While summer kicked off with a bit of a cool and wet start, we also know Calgary’s weather can be unpredictable and quickly turn into weeks of hot and dry conditions. With many Calgarians out in yards and tending to their gardens, The City of Calgary is reminding them that it’s always a good idea to use our precious water resources wisely and are offering their top tips to help keep your yard looking healthy, while making the most of water they do use and possibly saving you some time along the way. Click here to continue reading

New funding for flood mitigation in B.C.

PUBLISHED: 22 July 2022

Water Canada

First Nations and local governments can apply for funding for projects under the new Green Infrastructure Adaptation, Resilience and Disaster Mitigation (ARDM) program. The program will help communities protect people, homes and infrastructure from floods and flood-related hazards, while adapting to climate-related flooding effects. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Study: Balancing protein in your diet could improve water quality

PUBLISHED: 22 July 2022

Water Canada

Protein consumption in the United States, from both plant and animal sources, ranks among the highest in the world. The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, said that if Americans ate protein at recommended amounts, projected nitrogen excretion rates in 2055 would be 27 per cent less than they are today despite population growth. Click here to continue reading

Canadian lakes in hot water over climate change

PUBLISHED: 22 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer 

Canadian lakes are in hot water over climate change, a new research survey has concluded. “Canadian lakes are warming twice as fast as the rest of the lakes globally,” said York University biologist Sapna Sharma, a co-author of a paper published in the journal Bioscience. Sharma and her colleagues pored over 143 studies from around the world to try to summarize how climate change is affecting the globe’s 100 million lakes. Click here to continue reading

Repeatedly snarled in fishing gear, a scarred right whale fights for survival

PUBLISHED: 19 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Until he was 28 or so, a North Atlantic right whale named Meridian spent most of his time in the Bay of Fundy, swimming mouth open through zooplankton and sieving prey through his teeth-like baleen. A scar runs across his head, forward of his blowhole — a big arching line, like a meridian line on a globe. Click here to continue reading

Ottawa awards $870 million to B.C. for flood, landslide recovery

PUBLISHED: 19 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The federal government is providing $870 million to support recovery efforts after destructive flooding in British Columbia last November, Emergency Preparedness Minister Bill Blair announced Monday. The money is the first payment of a commitment Ottawa made in the immediate aftermath of the severe weather, with more to come, he said. Click here to continue reading

Go away, goldfish! Lethbridge, Alta. invites anglers to catch invasive goldfish

PUBLISHED: 19 July 2022

CTV News

If you’re into fishing and saving the local environment at the same time, then an initiative in the city of Lethbridge might be a great activity for you. On Saturday, officials are launching the first of two Goldfish Derby Days – events that not only teach people about the dangers of invasive species in local waterways but also gives them the opportunity to cut down on the populations. Click here to continue reading

As the Atlantic Ocean warms, fisheries scramble to adapt

PUBLISHED: 19 July 2022

CBC News

Cape Cod got its name for the abundance of cod off the shores of Massachusetts, but it wouldn’t be an apt namesake today. First, the once populous fish was decimated by decades of Atlantic overfishing, which was also felt acutely in Newfoundland. Now, climate change is further complicating that, as different fish species show up in Gulf of Maine waters warming more quickly than the global average. Click here to continue reading

Alberta farmers hopeful this year spells end of drought conditions

PUBLISHED: 19 July 2022

CBC News

Farmers and ranchers around southern Alberta are making hay while the sun shines — all while hoping it doesn’t shine too hard, or too long. Much of southern Alberta has been under a heat warning for the last week. Alberta farmers will get a nice reprieve from the heat in the coming few days with between 10 and 30 mm of rain expected to fall in the southern half of the province Sunday and into Monday, according to Environment Canada’s website. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: China floods leave at least 12 dead, with thousands evacuated

PUBLISHED: 19 July 2022

The Guardian

Flash floods in south-west and north-west China have left at least a dozen dead and put thousands of others in harm’s way, state media has reported. In the south-western province of Sichuan, at least six people have died and another 12 are missing after torrential rain triggered flash floods, state-owned news outlet CGTN reported on Sunday. Click here to continue reading

Meet the dogs sniffing stinky mussels for work, not play

PUBLISHED: 19 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Zebra and quagga mussels are small freshwater mussels originally from the Black and Caspian seas. First seen in North American lakes and rivers in the 1980s, they were probably imported by ships dumping their ballast water into the Great Lakes. The molluscs rapidly took hold, growing on everything from irrigation lines to hydro dams, and spread around waterways from the Eastern Seaboard and Ontario to California via contaminated boats. Click here to continue reading

When an iceberg flips: Dark Ice exhibition uncovers some Arctic truths

PUBLISHED: 16 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

There’s a phenomenon when an iceberg, after breaking off from a glacier and its weight is imbalanced, flips. It’s a process that reveals what had been submerged, bringing to the surface a whole new glacial landscape. Click here to continue reading

Weyburn lagoon system gets a helping hand

PUBLISHED: 16 July 2022

Water Canada

Seeking solutions to effectively remove its lagoon sludge and reduce the associated costs, the City of Weyburn, Saskatchewan opted to implement a new automated bioaugmentation service technology from EnBiorganic Technologies on a performance trial basis. Click here to continue reading

Stage 1 water restriction in effect

PUBLISHED: 16 July 2022

Wetaskiwin Times

The City of Wetaskiwin declared a Stage 1 water restriction Thursday, July 14, after discovering contamination in the central station reservoir. The station has since been isolated from the water distribution system, the city says, to keep the water supply safe for consumption. Click here to continue reading

Residents fear homes, farmland in Ontario’s Hillman Marsh area will go under water without federal help

PUBLISHED: 14 July 2022

CBC News

Residents, environmentalists and the mayor of Leamington, Ont., say homes and businesses are at severe risk while Ottawa considers an application for millions of dollars to help protect the Hillman Marsh Conservation Area on the Point Pelee peninsula against Lake Erie flooding. Click here to continue reading

Water restored for residents at southeast Calgary mobile home park

PUBLISHED: 14 July 2022

CTV News

Multiple residents a southeast Calgary mobile home park now have running water after being without it for days. A half-dozen residents of the Mountview Mobile Home Park found themselves without water late last week, and the Toronto-based company that owns the park says it all started with a minor leak. Click here to continue reading

Mining risks for Pacific Northwest salmon murky due to lack of transparent data

PUBLISHED: 14 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The impact of mining on key salmon watersheds in northwestern Canada and the U.S. is impossible to gauge because of a lack of transparency and access to data. That was one conclusion of a cross-border study involving a team of experts in salmon ecology, watershed science, mining policy that surveyed the intersection of mining risk with important salmon habitat, ranging from Montana to Alaska as well as B.C. and the Yukon. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: NSW city goes a week without drinkable water after floods cause contamination

PUBLISHED: 13 July 2022

The Guardian

Water in Dubbo and surrounding towns has been undrinkable for nearly a week as local authorities work to “climate-proof” against the future contamination of catchments. After the Little River swelled during the deluge of rain, animal faeces and carcasses were flushed into the catchment. Click here to continue reading

Irving Oil invests in electrolyzer to produce hydrogen from water

PUBLISHED: 13 July 2022

CBC News

Irving Oil is expanding hydrogen capacity at its Saint John, N.B., refinery in a bid to lower carbon emissions and offer clean energy to customers. The family-owned company said Tuesday it has a deal with New York-based Plug Power Inc. to buy a five-megawatt hydrogen electrolyzer that will produce two tonnes of hydrogen a day — equivalent to fuelling 60 buses with hydrogen — using electricity from the local grid. Click here to continue reading

Calgary mobile home residents without running water for days amid extreme heat

PUBLISHED: 13 July 2022

CTV News

A half-dozen residents of the Mountview Mobile Home Park in southeast Calgary have been without running water since a pipe burst late last week, shutting off water supply amid hot weather. A majority of the six affected mobile home occupants are senior citizens, who say doing basic tasks has been extremely challenging. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Africa turns to private sector to fund ocean climate action

PUBLISHED: 13 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Countries on Africa’s west coast are increasingly turning to climate funding initiatives to boost livelihoods of oceanside communities, aid biodiversity and take climate action. On the margins of the high−level political forum on sustainable development currently underway at the United Nations headquarters in New York, African coastal and island states and conservation groups outlined plans to boost ocean conservation and economic development through a system of “ blue bonds” — a method of financing projects that would also benefit ocean health. Click here to continue reading

Senate report calls for rights-based Indigenous fisheries

PUBLISHED: 13 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A new report from the Senate is calling on the federal government to implement Mi’kmaq, Wolastoqiyik and Peskotomuhkati rights-based fisheries on Canada’s East Coast and overhaul its approach to negotiations. One of the report’s 10 recommendations is that discussions with First Nations be immediately transferred to Crown-Indigenous Relations from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, which is something Indigenous communities have been calling for. Click here to continue reading

‘Unprecedented’ changes to world’s rivers

PUBLISHED: 13 July 2022

Science Daily

The way rivers function is significantly affected by how much sediment they transport and where it gets deposited. River sediment — mostly sand, silt, and clay — plays a critical ecological role, as it provides habitat for organisms downstream and in estuaries. It is also important for human life, resupplying nutrients to floodplain agricultural soils, and buffering sea level rise caused by climate change by delivering sand to deltas and coastlines. Click here to continue reading

Excessive rainfall causes landslides in Red Deer

PUBLISHED: 13 July 2022

City of Red Deer

The City is asking residents to watch for signs of cracking or moving ground after three landslides were reported in Red Deer earlier this week. On July 11 and 12, The City’s Engineering team was made aware of three separate land slides which occurred on private properties around the city. The landslides were a result of excessive rainfall in June, which saturated the soil and caused some areas to drop. Click here to continue reading

AHS issues blue-green algae advisory for Wizard Lake

PUBLISHED: 12 July 2022

Edmonton Journal 

A bloom of blue-green algae on the surface of Wizard Lake, about 50 km southwest of Edmonton, should have area residents and visitors on alert, Alberta’s health authority says. In a Monday news release, Alberta Health Services (AHS) warned visitors and lakeside residents to avoid all contact with blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria, which produces toxins harmful to both humans and pets. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Video captures moment tourists hit by avalanche in Kyrgyzstan’s Tian Shan mountains

PUBLISHED: 12 July 2022

CTV News

A group of tourists trekking in Kyrgyzstan’s Tian Shan mountains on Friday survived a huge avalanche that swept right over them. One of the trekkers, Briton Harry Shimmin, managed to capture on video the moment snow chipped off a mountain top in the distance, before blanketing the slope and engulfing the group. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: At least 16 killed, thousands rescued at flood-hit Hindu pilgrimage in Kashmir

PUBLISHED: 12 July 2022

CBC News

Emergency workers rescued thousands of pilgrims after flash floods triggered by sudden rains swept through their makeshift camps during an annual Hindu pilgrimage to an icy Himalayan cave in Indian-controlled Kashmir, officials said on Saturday. At least 16 people have died and dozens were injured. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Drought, heat and thunderstorms have Alaska burning

PUBLISHED: 12 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Alaska fire experts say the season has had an incredibly quick start, with fires driven by a severe drought, hot temperatures and an abundance of lightning strikes. More acreage burned in June than in the 2020 and 2021 Alaska fire seasons combined. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Spain and Portugal suffering driest climate for 1,200 years, research shows

PUBLISHED: 08 July 2022

The Guardian

Spain and Portugal are suffering their driest climate for at least 1,200 years, according to research, with severe implications for both food production and tourism. Most rain on the Iberian peninsula falls in winter as wet, low-pressure systems blow in from the Atlantic. But a high-pressure system off the coast, called the Azores high, can block the wet weather fronts. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Yellowstone floods reveal how climate change has made forecasting difficult

PUBLISHED: 08 July 2022

CBC News

The Yellowstone National Park area’s weather forecast the morning of June 12 seemed fairly tame: warmer temperatures and rain showers would accelerate mountain snow melt and could produce “minor flooding.” A National Weather Service bulletin recommended moving livestock from low-lying areas but made no mention of danger to people. By nightfall, after several centimetres of rain fell on a deep spring snowpack, there were record-shattering floods. Click here to continue reading

Calgary Fire Department Reminds River Users to Use Extreme Caution When Recreating on the Water

PUBLISHED: 08 July 2022

City of Calgary 

On Wednesday, July 6 at approximately 6:40 in the evening, the Calgary Fire Department aquatics team was dispatched to the 7100 block of Bow Crescent for reports of two people who had fallen into the Bow River. One person was calling for help and the other was possibly trapped under the paddleboards they were using. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Will a Nile canal project dry up Africa’s biggest wetland?

PUBLISHED: 08 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Seen from space, the Sudd swamp is a giant green smudge where the White Nile, one of the great river’s two main branches, spreads out across flat arid land, forming myriad back channels that are often covered in floating vegetation. Africa’s largest freshwater wetland permanently occupies roughly 3,500 square miles in an otherwise dry region of South Sudan and floods up to 10 times more in the wet season. Click here to continue reading

Infrastructure bank eyes irrigation investment

PUBLISHED: 08 July 2022

The Western Producer

The Canada Infrastructure Bank is ready to discuss investing in Saskatchewan’s $4-billion irrigation project if the provincial government asks. The bank has already spent almost half-a-billion dollars in Alberta’s irrigation sector. It’s also working on a project to alleviate congestion at the port of Vancouver. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba government provides funding to protect fish and wildlife

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

Water Canada

The Manitoba government is helping protect the province’s natural resources by awarding over $1 million in funding for 35 fish and wildlife improvement projects from the Fish and Wildlife Enhancement Fund (FWEF), Natural Resources and Northern Development Minister Greg Nesbitt announced. Click here to continue reading

Water Security Agency expanding channel clearing assistance for local governments to support agricultural industry

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

Water Canada

The Water Security Agency (WSA) is providing new funding for channel clearing as well as maintenance for constructed agricultural drainage projects. Up to $1 million is available in 2022-23 for local governments to apply, including rural municipalities (RMs), Conservation and Development Area Authorities (C&Ds) and Watershed Associations. Click here to continue reading

Calgary’s rainy summer getting mixed reaction from businesses, agriculture sector

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

CTV News

It’s been a wet summer so far in Calgary and the surrounding areas, with lots of rain and cooler temperatures. Those two things are putting a damper on business for places like Calgary restaurant Porch, which relies on its patio to bring in patrons during the summer. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Record rainfall displaces 50,000 people as Sydney’s wild weather moves north

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

The Guardian

Record rainfall has displaced 50,000 people from their homes in Sydney, with more than 150 evacuation orders and warnings remaining in place on Tuesday night as the wild weather headed north. Parts of New South Wales have had more than 700mm of rainfall since the floods hit, while areas of the Illawarra have experienced record July rainfall in a matter of days. Click here to continue reading

Calgary firm pleads guilty to acidic water release in west-central Alberta

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

CBC News

Tidewater Midstream and Infrastructure Ltd. has pleaded guilty to a charge related to the company’s release of acidic water in west-central Alberta in October 2019. The Calgary-based company was charged in October 2021 with breaching environmental protection laws by the Alberta Energy Regulator. In an agreed statement of facts, Tidewater acknowledged the release occurred at the company’s Ram River sour gas processing plant near Rocky Mountain House. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Monsoon rains cause at least 77 deaths in Pakistan in three weeks

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

The Guardian

At least 77 people have died in rain-related incidents across Pakistan in the past three weeks, the country’s minister for climate change said on Wednesday. The monsoon rains have also damaged homes, roads, bridges and power stations, Sherry Rehman told a news conference in the capital, Islamabad, as storms continued to lash the country. Click here to continue reading

AHS issues water advisory for Zeiner Park Beach

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

Wetaskiwin Times

Due to elevated levels of fecal bacteria currently present in the water of Zeiner Park Beach at Pigeon Lake, located within the Central and Edmonton Zones of Alberta Health Services (AHS), AHS is advising the public not to swim or wade at Zeiner Park Beach, effective immediately. Click here to continue reading

As flood waters recede, northwestern Ontario communities turn attention to cleanup, mitigation

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

CBC News

As flood waters in the area recede, the northwestern Ontario municipality of Sioux Lookout is now shifting its focus to cleaning up, and preparing for the future. Water levels across the region are dropping, according to the Lake of the Woods Secretariat. The Lake of the Woods fell by one centimetre in the last week, while Namikan Lake has returned to normal summer levels. Click here to continue reading

Climate change creates hazards for Alpine glaciers

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Italy was enduring a prolonged heat wave before a massive piece of Alpine glacier broke off and killed hikers on Sunday and experts say climate change will make those hot, destabilizing conditions more common. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Utah’s Great Salt Lake hits new historic low amid drought in western US

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

The Guardian

The Great Salt Lake has hit a new historic low for the second time in less than a year, a dire milestone as the US west continues to weather a historic mega-drought. The Utah department of natural resources said in a news release on Monday that the Great Salt Lake dipped over the weekend to 4,190.1ft (1,277.1 meters). Click here to continue reading

Odd fish has adapted to Canada’s deepest, coldest lakes

PUBLISHED: 07 July 2022

Science Daily

The deepwater sculpin is not an attractive fish by any conventional standard. You won’t find it hanging on a plaque or landing a feature role in a Disney movie. What you might say about the bottom-dweller is that it’s a survivor, having managed to eke out an existence at the bottom of Canada’s deepest and coldest lakes since the last ice age. Researchers are now sequencing its entire genome to see how this seemingly unremarkable fish has been able to adapt to such extreme environments. Click here to continue reading

Global water basins’ hotspots prioritize areas under threat: USask research

PUBLISHED: 05 July 2022

Water Canada

Recent studies involving a University of Saskatchewan (USask) researcher show where groundwater is becoming less available globally, but less work has been done to understand the impact changes to these water systems have on people. That is where a new study, which was recently published in Nature Communications, takes into account both social and ecological impacts, allowing researchers to identify global “hotspots” where the threat to the water basin is most concerning. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Snow at Austrian observatory 3,000 metres above sea level melting earlier than ever before

PUBLISHED: 05 July 2022

The Guardian

The snow at the highest observatory in the world to be operated all-year-round is expected to completely melt in the next few days, the earliest time on record. Scientists at the Sonnblick observatory in the Austrian Central Alps, which is 3,106 metres (10,190ft) above sea level, have been shocked and dismayed to see the snow depleting so quickly. Click here to continue reading

‘Safety in numbers’ tactic keeps Pacific salmon safe from predators

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

Science Daily

A new study that leverages historical data has found unique support for a ‘safety in numbers’ strategy, where Pacific salmon living in larger groups have a lower risk of being eaten by predators. But for some salmon species, schooling comes at the cost of competition for food, and those fish may trade safety for a meal. Click here to continue reading

‘It’s about safety first’: Authorities encouraging safety on the North Saskatchewan River this summer

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

Edmonton Journal

More than half the boaters on the North Saskatchewan River in Edmonton were flouting safety rules last year, say authorities as they highlighted the risks ahead of the Canada Day long weekend. River users should always wear a life jacket, have access to a signaling device and keep a cellphone in a waterproof case or dry bag so if someone ends up in the water they can call rescuers to their location. Click here to continue reading

Flooding rain across Prairies may not be enough to end prolonged drought conditions. Here’s why

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

CBC News

After last year’s record-breaking heat and dry weather, the rain this spring and summer has been welcome to many on the Prairies. Yet, despite all the rain, drought conditions continue in Alberta and Saskatchewan. And while it seems like this extra bump of rain is the solution to the drought, is it actually enough? Though it may be hard to believe, the answer is likely no. Click here to continue reading

Several Kananaskis campgrounds closed through long weekend due to lingering snowpack

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

CTV News

Inaccessible toilets, muddy or snow-covered tent pads and less than favourable trail conditions have prompted the delayed opening of five backcountry campgrounds in Kananaskis country. Alberta Parks says the campgrounds in Peter Lougheed Provincial Park and Spray Lakes Provincial Park will remain closed through the Canada Day long weekend as a result of the lingering snowpack. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Singapore craft beer uses recycled sewage to highlight water scarcity

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

The Guardian

It is a beer made with only the finest ingredients: premium German barley malts, aromatic Citra and Calypso hops, farmhouse yeast from Norway – and reclaimed sewage. NewBrew, a collaboration between Singapore’s national water agency and the local craft brewery Brewerkz, has already proved popular and has sold out on tap at the brewery’s restaurants, according to reports. Click here to continue reading

Fecal bacteria triggers water quality advisory for Zeiner Park Beach

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

Global News

Alberta Health Services says a water quality advisory has been issued for Zeiner Park Beach at Pigeon Lake Provincial Park. The health authority said the advisory was triggered “due to elevated levels of fecal bacteria currently present in the water.” AHS added that contact with the water at this time could also potentially result in skin, ear or eye infections. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pearl Harbor water poisoning: US military families say they continue to fall ill

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

The Guardian

Beginning in December, US army Major Amanda Feindt and her family found themselves in and out of Tripler army medical center in Honolulu. First, her husband for debilitating ocular migraines, then her four-year-old daughter, who was vomiting with severe abdominal pain, then her one-year-old for chemical burns, and later herself when she started experiencing crippling back pain that prevented her from being able to walk, among other troubling symptoms. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Storms slow search for missing hikers after Italy glacier collapse that killed at least 7

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

CBC News

Thunderstorms hampered Monday the search for more than a dozen hikers who remained unaccounted for a day after a huge chunk of an Alpine glacier in Italy broke off, sending an avalanche of ice, snow and rocks down the slope. Officials have now put the death toll at seven. Drones were being used to help look for any of the missing as well as to verify safety, but even they had to stop operating when thunderstorms lashed the area in late morning. Click here to continue reading

City of Guelph award-winning Water Supply Master Plan approved by council

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

Water Canada

Council has approved the Water Supply and the Wastewater Treatment and Biosolids Management master plans, both of which relied heavily on community engagement to inform staff’s recommendations. The City of Guelph is committed to protecting the environment including our water resources. Engagement with the community and Indigenous Nations identified high value on water supply protection, support for the City’s water conservation and efficiency programs, protection of the natural environment, managing growth and development, and controlling impacts both from large water users and on other water users. Click here to continue reading

‘Flushable’ wipes causing growing number of clogs for Calgary wastewater crews

PUBLISHED: 04 July 2022

CBC News

They might be out of sight, out of mind once they’re flushed down the toilet, but single-use wipes are causing a headache for Calgary wastewater crews. The wipes, along with a whole host of other items not meant to be sent down the toilet or the sink, cause sewer backups in homes and businesses and clog pipes along city streets. Click here to continue reading

Real-time flood plain mapping for improved forecasting

PUBLISHED: 29 June 2022

Water Canada

The International Lake Champlain-Richelieu River Study Board (Study Board) has published a new technical report, Development of a Binational Flood Forecasting and Real-time Flood Plain Mapping System for Operational Implementation as part of its multi-year study into finding solutions to flooding in the Lake Champlain-Richelieu River (LCRR) basin. Click here to continue reading

Water Security Agency invests in new weather and soil monitoring stations

PUBLISHED: 29 June 2022

Water Canada

The Water Security Agency (WSA) has invested nearly $600,000 in new weather and soil monitoring stations in a dozen locations across the province. Starting in fall 2021, with the cooperation of local landowners, and in partnership with the Saskatchewan Public Safety Agency (SPSA), WSA installed twelve weather stations in areas where gaps in data gathering networks exist. Click here to continue reading

Nature Conservancy of Canada expands freshwater wetlands in Nova Scotia

PUBLISHED: 28 June 2022

Water Canada

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is announcing the expansion of an important private land conservation area in southcentral Nova Scotia. The not-for-profit conservation organization has purchased 51 hectares of intact forest, freshwater wetlands, lakes and a one-kilometre section of river frontage along the Musquodoboit River. The new parcel of land brings NCC’s conservation area to 317 hectares in the Musquodoboit River Valley. Click here to continue reading

Bi-national Circular Great Lakes strategy and action plan released by CGLR

PUBLISHED: 28 June 2022

Water Canada

The Council of the Great Lakes Region (CGLR), as part of its Circular Great Lakes initiative, released an innovative five-year circular economy strategy and action plan for plastics. The organization worked in collaboration with a number of corporate stakeholders in the plastics value chain as well as government, academic, and NGO partners to develop the plan. The aim is to forge a future without plastic packaging waste and litter in the bi-national Great Lakes region, the engine of the North American economy and guardian of the largest freshwater system in the world. Click here to continue reading

Eddy Smart Home Solutions Ltd. and Tridel partner for water control in the Well

PUBLISHED: 28 June 2022

Water Canada

Eddy’s system protects the project with a comprehensive system of real-time monitoring, smart sensors, and remote and automatic shutoffs that identify and action issues from the construction phase when the water is first initiated and extended to all functioning areas of the finalized building post-occupancy, including the risers, hydronics, in-suite, and common areas. The system will be installed in Well C, D, and E in Tridel’s project, and all ongoing projects in the GTA. Click here to continue reading

Investment in upgrades to water and wastewater infrastructure for Sussex and Riverside-Albert

PUBLISHED: 28 June 2022

Water Canada

More than $1.8 million has been announced by three levels of government for upgrades to water and wastewater infrastructure in Sussex and Riverside-Albert. The installation of a new wastewater pumping station in Sussex will replace aging infrastructure and improve the community’s ability to treat and manage wastewater. Click here to continue reading

B.C. flood victims fear losing their homes — again — after Red Cross unexpectedly ends support

PUBLISHED: 28 June 2022

CBC News

The provincial and federal governments have been working with the Red Cross to provide personalized recovery support for flood relief, including interim housing and basic needs assistance. While the Red Cross says it has supported thousands of flood victims, struggling residents are calling for more flexibility in financial support and better communication for victims of natural disasters. Click here to continue reading

Data Meets Action: The Riparian Web Portal

PUBLISHED: 28 June 2022

Water Canada

In 2002, Alberta farmer Don Ruzicka was facing the worst drought in recent history. Fortunately, five years earlier, Ruzicka had worked with Ducks Unlimited Canada to restore a wetland on his property which was now functioning as a natural reservoir to retain water. As the drought worsened, his neighbours whose man-made dugouts had dried-up, asked if they could use water from Ruzicka’s still-saturated wetland. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Kenya devises coral reef nurseries to restore dying coral

PUBLISHED: 28 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Minutes away from the Kenyan mainland, the densely forested island of Wasini is one of several starting lines for coral reef restoration efforts in the western Indian Ocean. On a rare calm day during the normally turbulent monsoon season, four divers, carrying measuring equipment, shoes and toothbrushes descended in turns to the sea−bed reef restoration site on the Shimoni channel. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: California’s largest reservoirs at critically low levels – signaling a dry summer ahead

PUBLISHED: 24 June 2022

The Guardian

California’s two largest reservoirs are at critically low levels, signaling that the state, like much of the US west, can expect a searing, dry summer ahead. This week, officials confirmed that Lake Oroville, the state’s second-largest reservoir, was at just 55% of its total capacity when it reached its highest level for the year last month. Meanwhile, Shasta Lake, California’s largest reservoir, was at 40% capacity last month – after the state endured its driest start to a year since the late 19th century. Click here to continue reading

Oceana Canada celebrates federal ban on six categories of single-use plastics

PUBLISHED: 24 June 2022

Water Canada

Oceana Canada is celebrating a significant milestone in the fight to end Canada’s contribution to the global plastic pollution crisis, following today’s federal government announcement banning six categories of the most commonly found plastics polluting Canada’s shorelines and oceans. The ban will gradually eliminate the Canadian production and export of plastic bags, cutlery, stir sticks, six-pack rings, straws and some takeout containers. Click here to continue reading

Cleaning Our Shoreline partners with the PEI aquaculture industry and watershed groups to protect Island shorelines

PUBLISHED: 24 June 2022

Water Canada

The Cleaning Our Shoreline team will work with industry and community partners to clean Island beaches this summer. The PEI Aquaculture Alliance (PEIAA) and local watershed groups began clean-up efforts earlier this year, and the Cleaning Our Shoreline student crews will join them from June 20 to August 27 to remove and dispose of debris from coastal shorelines. Since 2020, student crews have helped dispose 27,230 kilograms of debris from 443 beaches and shorelines. Click here to continue reading

The 2021 heat dome in B.C. had wide-ranging impacts on marine life, scientists say

PUBLISHED: 24 June 2022

CBC News

A new study in the journal Ecology suggests that last year’s heat dome over the west coast of B.C. and Washington state may have “far-reaching” effects on the ecology of beaches, bluffs, inlets and river deltas, in addition to the impact on fisheries and cultural connections that the land, sea and sea life provide. The heat that descended on the West Coast last June not only killed 619 people, but also roughly a billion sea creatures, which baked to death as temperatures soared. Click here to continue reading

Water quality advisory lifted for Chestermere Lake

PUBLISHED: 23 June 2022

CTV News

Alberta Health Services lifted the water quality advisory for the water in Chestermere Lake at Anniversary Park Beach, Cove Park Beach and Sunset Park Beach Wednesday. “Water quality has returned to an acceptable level and the health risk is low for usage of these beaches for recreational purposes,” AHS said in a release. The water quality advisory was initially issued after increased fecal matter levels were recorded in the water. Click here to continue reading

B.C. fish farm licences renewed outside Discovery Islands until at least spring 2023

PUBLISHED: 23 June 2022

CBC News

Open-net salmon farming may continue off British Columbia’s coast outside the Discovery Islands area, while Ottawa undertakes consultation on a plan to transition away from the practice, the federal government announced Wednesday. Fisheries and Oceans Canada will share a draft framework for the transition in the coming weeks and consultation will run until early 2023 with the final plan to phase out 79 open-net pen farms expected to be released next spring, the department said. Click here to continue reading

Slow spring melt means Milk River farmers may avoid another summer of water shortages

PUBLISHED: 23 June 2022

CBC News

Just under two months ago, Elise Walker was sure her farm near the Milk River would experience another summer of drought conditions. But with a cool, rainy spring now in the rearview, things are looking much different. The native prairie has a nice green tinge, she said, and the rain keeps coming. “It makes a huge difference, considering how dry we’ve been the past 12 months,” she told the Calgary Eyeopener Monday. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Drought threatens northern Italy’s crops

PUBLISHED: 23 June 2022

The Western Producer

Northern Italian regions risk losing up to half their agricultural output due to a drought, a farm lobby said June 17, as lakes and rivers across much of Italy start to run dangerously low, jeopardizing irrigation. The federation of Italian utility companies, Utilitalia, warned last week that the country’s longest river, the Po, was experiencing its worst drought for 70 years, leaving many sections of the vast, northern waterway completely dried up. Click here to continue reading

As water sources dry up, towns in southern Quebec sound the alarm

PUBLISHED: 22 June 2022

CBC News

During an unrelenting stretch of dry, hot weather last August, Rachel Mahannah and her husband spent two hours a day hauling water from their other farm a kilometre and a half away, to make sure their dairy cows didn’t get dehydrated. The well on the dairy farm, 70 metres deep, had almost run dry. Click here to continue reading

Minister Guilbeault announces investment with Ducks Unlimited Canada to conserve wetland and coastal marshes across Eastern Canada

PUBLISHED: 22 June 2022

Water Canada

Conserving and restoring nature is fundamental to reducing the impacts of a changing climate and to ensuring Canadians have a healthy environment. The Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, announced that the Government of Canada will invest $5.6 million over three years with Ducks Unlimited Canada. The funding will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by  increasing biodiversity conservation efforts in southern Canadian wetlands and coastal areas in the six eastern provinces of Canada, from Ontario to Newfoundland and Labrador. Click here to continue reading

Federal, provincial, and municipal governments invest in improved wastewater infrastructure for Northeastern New Brunswick

PUBLISHED: 22 June 2022

Water Canada

Funding will support the renewal of aging sanitary sewer lines, aqueduct lines and storm sewer lines on Principale Street in Tracadie. This will help reduce infiltration issues and avoid annual water main breaks. In addition, the street will be rebuilt with a focus on active transportation. Click here to continue reading

Scientists unveil bionic robo-fish to remove microplastics from seas

PUBLISHED: 22 June 2022

The Guardian

Scientists have designed a tiny robot-fish that is programmed to remove microplastics from seas and oceans by swimming around and adsorbing them on its soft, flexible, self-healing body. Microplastics are the billions of tiny plastic particles which fragment from the bigger plastic things used every day such as water bottles, car tyres and synthetic T-shirts. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Millions of people marooned in India, Bangladesh floods

PUBLISHED: 21 June 2022

CBC News

In Sylhet, in northeastern Bangladesh along the Surma River, villagers waded through streets flooded up to their knees. One man stood in the doorway of his flooded shop, where the top shelves were crammed with items in an effort to keep them above water. Local media said millions have been left without electricity. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Largest freshwater fish ever recorded caught in Cambodia

PUBLISHED: 21 June 2022

The Guardian

The world’s largest recorded freshwater fish, a giant stingray, has been caught in the Mekong River in Cambodia, according to scientists. The stingray, captured on 13 June, measured almost four metres from snout to tail and weighed just under 300kg, according to a statement on Monday by Wonders of the Mekong, a joint Cambodian-US research project. The previous record for a freshwater fish was a 293kg Mekong giant catfish discovered in Thailand in 2005, the group said. Click here to continue reading

Government of Canada strengthens partnership with Indigenous coastal communities to enhance marine safety

PUBLISHED: 21 June 2022

Water Canada

Through the Oceans Protection Plan, the largest investment ever made to protect Canada’s coasts, the Government of Canada is working in partnership with Indigenous coastal communities to improve marine safety for mariners. As part of this plan, in 2017 the Canadian Coast Guard launched the Indigenous Community Boat Volunteer Pilot Program. This program provides Indigenous communities with funding to purchase boats and equipment to build up their on-water search and rescue capabilities. Click here to continue reading

Saskatoon celebrates completion of Wastewater Treatment Plant Digester and Heating Upgrades project

PUBLISHED: 21 June 2022

Water Canada

The City of Saskatoon has announced that work is now completed on the Digester and Heating Upgrades project at the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP). The 3-year, $48.2 million project is funded by the Government of Canada ($9.5 million) and Government of Saskatchewan ($9.5 million) through their New Building Canada Fund, with a $29.2 million investment by the City of Saskatoon. Click here to continue reading

View: Water is key to our economic future: Why aren’t we investing in it like we should?

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

Euro News Green

Water ripples through many sectors of the global economy. Whether companies are in the business of hygiene or hamburgers, phones or pharmaceuticals, they all have water in their supply chain. But those connections also mean risk, especially as climate change disrupts the water cycle with longer droughts, more frequent flooding, and continued sea-level rise. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: India, Bangladesh floods leave millions homeless, 18 dead

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer 

Army troops were called in to rescue thousands of people stranded by massive floods that have ravaged northeastern India and Bangladesh, leaving millions of homes underwater and severing transport links, authorities said Saturday. In India’s Assam state, at least nine people were killed in the floods and 2 million saw their homes submerged, according to the state disaster management agency. Lightning strikes in parts of neighboring Bangladesh have left at least nine dead since Friday. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Mount Everest base camp to be moved as climate change accelerates glacial melt

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

CTV News

Mount Everest’s most famous base camp is being moved further down the mountain, as ice that took 2,000 years to form slowly melts away. The south base camp on Mount Everest is just the starting place for climbers, but it’s located on top of a thinning glacier that’s becoming increasingly dangerous amid climate change. Click here to continue reading

SHARC Energy and HTS Ontario to supply two PIRANHA T15 Wastewater Energy Transfer Systems

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

Water Canada

SHARC International Systems Inc. (CSE: SHRC) (FSE: IWIA) (OTCQB: INTWF) (“SHARC Energy” or the “Company”), a world leader in energy transfer from wastewater, is pleased to announce that the Company and HTS Ontario (“HTS”), a representative of SHARC Energy products, have been selected to supply two PIRANHA T15 Wastewater Energy Transfer (“WET”) systems to be installed in Ottawa. These units will help a new housing complex recover the thermal energy from wastewater. This project represents the second PIRANHA site in Ottawa, Ontario. The units are expected to ship in the fourth quarter of 2022. Click here to continue reading

Tidal power: How the Bay of Fundy can be used as renewable energy

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

CTV News

Located just off Nova Scotia’s Brier Island, six turbines attached to a floating platform are generating enough electricity to power 150 homes. Harnessing the power of the Bay of Fundy into reliable and renewable energy has been an idea around for decades, and this project is the first of its kind in Canada. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Heat wave: how Orkney is leading a tidal power revolution

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

The Guardian

Orkney, chosen as the European Marine Energy Centre’s (Emec) headquarters for its combination of strong tides and waves as well as connection to the energy grid, has become a hub for tidal power innovation. Alongside Scottish company Orbital, Spain-based Magallanes is also testing at Emec and US company Aquantis has just signed up to a six-month demo programme. Tidal power, while not yet widely commercialised, is seen by many as the next frontier in global renewables. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: How heavy snow and rain flooded Yellowstone

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Just three months ago, the Yellowstone region like most of the West was dragging through an extended drought with little snow in the mountains and wildfire scars in Red Lodge from a year ago when the area was hit by 40.5 C heat and fire. Rivers and creeks this week raged with water much higher and faster than even the rare benchmark 500-year flood. Weather-whiplashed residents and government officials raced to save homes, roads and businesses. Click here to continue reading

Calgary lifts state of local emergency as weather forecast improves; berm to be removed

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

Calgary Herald

The City of Calgary has lifted its state of local emergency as officials believe the latest weather system will track south of the city. The emergency was declared on Monday in response to a three-day storm which dumped significant rainfall across Calgary as well as areas west of the city. According to Environment Canada, Calgary received just over 61 mm of rain over the past week and approximately 105 mm since the start of June, causing high levels in both the Bow and Elbow rivers. Click here to continue reading

As Montreal cleans up from heavy rains, mayor vows to fight off future floods

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

CBC News

Montreal was a mess on Thursday. After about 40 millimetres of rain fell, streets were flooded, part of the Metro system temporarily shut down and sewer covers popped open. On Friday, staff at a downtown day shelter for Indigenous people experiencing homelessness were still scrambling to clean up while throwing out boxes and bags of donated clothes which were ruined by water that had seeped into the building. Click here to continue reading

Fecal bacteria in Chestermere Lake prompts advisory to stay out of the water

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

CBC News

Alberta Health Services issued a water quality advisory on Friday for Chestermere Lake because of elevated levels of fecal bacteria. AHS says people should not swim or wade in the water at Anniversary Park Beach, Cove Park Beach or Sunset Park Beach, effective immediately. Contact with the water could result in gastrointestinal illness. Skin, ear and eye infections are also possible. Water-borne organisms, including fecal bacteria, can cause vomiting and diarrhea. Click here to continue reading

Flooding concerns ease in Red Deer

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

Red Deer Advocate 

Flooding concerns have subsided for Red Deer, says the city. The city said since Thursday afternoon, water levels on the Red Deer River and tributaries have stabilized, as well as outflow rates from Dickson Dam. However, Red Deer River remains under a high streamflow advisory by Alberta Environment and boat launches into the river remain closed. Click here to continue reading

New flood watch issued for Clearwater River near Rocky Mountain House

PUBLISHED: 20 June 2022

Red Deer Advocate

A flood watch has been issued for the Clearwater River and Little Red Deer River basin near Rocky Mountain House, along with some park and road closures. On Friday morning there were flood warnings issued for these two rivers, but they were were downgraded to flood watches later in the day as Alberta Environment believes most major rivers flowing out of the foothills have now peaked. Click here to continue reading

Walkerton Clean Water Centre pilot project helped address arsenic in groundwater supply

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

Water Canada

Since 2007, the Walkerton Clean Water Centre (WCWC) has conducted pilot tests to help drinking water professionals better understand source water characteristics, treatment process performance and alternative treatment options. WCWC recently followed up with a former pilot testing client to learn about their progress since the project was completed. Click here to continue reading

UVic leads national project to tackle water and sanitation crisis

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

Water Canada

If problems around water quality and wastewater in remote and poorly served communities are to be solved, they’ll need funding, local involvement and technical know-how. Caetano Dorea, a University of Victoria professor in civil engineering at UVic, is leading a team that has been awarded a $1.65-million Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada grant to train emerging engineers to work on water and sanitation projects in low-resource contexts in Canada and abroad. Click here to continue reading

Drought slashes EU durum production

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

The Western Producer

The durum crop in the European Union is in trouble, says an analyst from that region of the world. The European Commission is forecasting 7.6 million tonnes of production, down two percent from last year and five percent below the five-year average. But industry groups think it could be a lot worse than that. Italy usually accounts for about 50 to 60 percent of EU durum production, followed by France, Spain and Greece, according to Annachiara Saguatti, market intelligence analyst with Areté, an Italian agri-food intelligence company.  Click here to continue reading

Red Deer River levels peaked

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

City of Red Deer

Water levels on the Red Deer River have begun peaking, however the river remains under a high streamflow advisory. Since Monday, the Red Deer River has risen approximately one and half meters. Some low-lying areas of the McKenzie Trail area saw isolated flooding, however no trails were closed or damage to park infrastructure occurred. Click here to continue reading

City closes trails as North Saskatchewan River water levels expected to peak Friday

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

CTV News

The city has closed four low-lying trails as water levels in the North Saskatchewan River rise. Officials say water levels are expected to rise over the next 24 hours, peaking on Friday morning. High water levels may cause some flooding in areas running along the river. Emily Murphy Park to Kinsmen Park Trail, Highlands lower trail, river loop trail alongside Fort Edmonton Park, and Gold Bar Park lower trail have been closed because of the threat of flooding. Click here to continue reading

City keeping flood mitigation measures in place as second storm system approaches

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

Calgary Herald

Flood mitigation measures will remain in place in anticipation of another storm system that could strike Calgary next week. Calgary water services director Francois Bouchart said forecasts show 50 to 100 mm of rain falling Monday and continuing through Tuesday, causing water levels in rivers to peak the day after rain ends. Uncertainty of early forecasts and models means the storm could miss Calgary entirely, Bouchart acknowledged, but he said it would represent a flood risk if it does materialize. Click here to continue reading

Alberta irrigators turn on taps early

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

The Western Producer

Irrigated crops in Alberta are doing better than their dryland counterparts but challenges exist. Sugar beets, potatoes and corn crops have been fully seeded across the southern portion of the province for several weeks and they need hotter weather to spur growth. Cory VandenElzen, Alberta Sugar Beet Growers vice-president, said about 500 sugar beet acres required re-seeding due to dry and windy conditions but that’s about average in any year. Click here to continue reading

Sylvan Lake to raise awareness around pollutants in stormwater systems

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

Sylvan Lake News

A Sylvan Lake group is endeavouring to bring awareness to where the rainwater goes and the impact of pollutants through a Yellow Fish Road project. It sheds the spotlight on harm caused by pollutants to the ecosystem and urban life, while inspiring youth to take action in the community. Town of Sylvan Lake’s Youth IMPACT (Individuals Making Positive Action and Change Today) Coalition has partnered with three local schools to implement the project. It is an educational program that was created by Trout Unlimited Canada aiming to reduce water pollution. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Water supply in Montana’s biggest city imperiled by Yellowstone floods

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

The Guardian

The unprecedented flooding that wrecked parts of Yellowstone national park is also jeopardizing freshwater supplies in Montana’s most populated city. The roughly 110,000 residents of Billings, Montana, were asked on Wednesday to conserve water after intense flooding in the region shut down service from the city’s main water plant, reported Q2 News, a local Billings news outlet. City officials sent out a press release on Wednesday morning, alerting that the city’s water plant was shut on Tuesday night due to the historic flooding. Click here to continue reading

Calgary’s flood mitigation efforts are more robust than ever

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

City TV 

Our very own Executive Director, Kim Sturgess, was interviewed yesterday to discuss Calgary’s flood mitigation infrastructure and recent rainfall’s impact on Alberta producers. Click here to continue reading

Flood concerns and downed trees: Calgary cleans up after storms

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

CTV News

Mayor Jyoti Gondek addressed the situation Thursday morning alongside Sue Henry, the chief of Calgary Emergency Management Agency, as well as Francois Bouchart, director of water resources. Significant rainfall early in the week led to concerns the Bow and Elbow rivers might breach their banks. As the rain subsided, strong wind gusts brought down trees and caused power outages throughout the city. Click here to continue reading

Insurance costs from B.C.’s atmospheric rivers total $675 million

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

November’s floods in British Columbia that swamped homes and farms, swept away roads and bridges and killed five people are now the most costly weather event in provincial history. The Insurance Bureau of Canada made the statement as it released the latest cost estimate of $675 million, and that’s only for damage that was insured. Click here to continue reading

‘Instant relief’: Rain brings hope to southern Alberta producers

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

Calgary Herald

The low water table is also impacting available water for dugouts that are normally filled by winter runoff, leaving ranchers facing potential shortages this summer if the rain stops and the temperature shoots up. This is further impacted by a global grain shortage, which continues to push the cost of feed higher with profit margins that are already tight. Click here to continue reading

Red Deer River levels expected to rise

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

City of Red Deer

The City of Red Deer’s Emergency Operations Centre continues to monitor local waterways for impacts with information from Dickson Dam and Alberta Environment. Outflow rates from Dickson Dam increased this morning, and we anticipate to see the Red Deer River rise by one meter starting this evening around 6 p.m. and peaking tomorrow afternoon. At this point, we expect minimal localized flooding in the McKenzie Trail area, with no impacts expected to residential areas. Click here to continue reading

Steady rain causes basement flooding across central Alberta

PUBLISHED: 17 June 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Calls from homeowners with flooded basements are pouring into local restoration companies from across central Alberta. After three straight days of rain, with some areas seeing upwards of 60 millimetres, businesses dealing with water damage were inundated with calls for service — not only from Red Deer, but from homeowners from Rocky Mountain House to Gadsby. Click here to continue reading

Rainfall warnings ended for all of Alberta

PUBLISHED: 16 June 2022

Global News

After days of rain in many areas of Alberta, rainfall warnings have been dropped for the entire province. Environment Canada issued special weather statements on Sunday, warning of significant rain for areas around Calgary, Airdrie, Canmore and Crowsnest Pass. At the time, the weather agency said 75 to 100 millimetres of rain was expected by Wednesday morning. Click here to continue reading

Revised Update on City of Calgary response to weather event

PUBLISHED: 16 June 2022

City of Calgary

The system has begun to move east resulting in conditions tapering off. Environment Canada has ended the wind and rainfall warnings, but the State of Local Emergency remains in effect. Over the last 48 hours Calgary has received 70–80mm of precipitation with up to 100mm in localized areas. Wind gusts are expected to reach 70 km/h today. The boating advisory remains in effect on both the Bow and Elbow rivers and will be in place until water levels taper off to a safe level. Click here to continue reading

More than 100 towns in Italy’s Po valley asked to ration water

PUBLISHED: 16 June 2022

The Guardian

More than 100 towns in the Po valley have been asked to ration water amid the worst drought to affect Italy’s longest river in 70 years. Northern Italy has been deprived of significant rainfall for months, with the effects of drought along the 400-mile (650km) Po River, which stretches from the Alps in the north-west and flows through the Po delta before spilling out into the Adriatic, becoming visible early in the year. Click here to continue reading

‘Nerve-racking’: 2013 flood victims confront deja vu

PUBLISHED: 15 June 2022

Calgary Herald

Nearly 100,000 Calgarians living mainly in riverside communities were evacuated during the 2013 deluge, which led to five deaths and $5 billion in insurable damage. Those effects have indeed been prolonged and only exacerbated by this week’s flooding scare in southern Alberta, said Dr. Caroline McDonald-Harker, a Mount Royal University sociologist who’s studied the aftermath of the 2013 disaster and the 2016 Fort McMurray wildfire. Click here to continue reading

 

Compare and Contrast: Yellowstone visitors ordered to leave as floodwaters leave wreckage behind

PUBLISHED: 15 June 2022

The Guardian

More than 10,000 visitors were ordered out of Yellowstone as unprecedented flooding tore through the nation’s oldest national park, washing out road and bridges, officials said on Tuesday. The only visitors left in the massive park that straddles three states were a dozen campers still making their way out of the backcountry. The park, which celebrates its 150th anniversary this year, could remain closed as long as a week, and northern entrances may not reopen this summer. Click here to continue reading

Update on City of Calgary response to weather forecast

PUBLISHED: 15 June 2022

City of Calgary

Over the past 24 hours, the majority of precipitation for this system has fallen and the amount of rain was a bit less than the high end of the forecast. So far, approximately 75-100 mm of precipitation has been received. The system is starting to taper off with up to 40 mm of rain expected today. Fortunately, some of this precipitation fell as snow in the mountains, which helps as it takes time to melt and therefore slows the run-off. The peak river flow is still expected Tuesday night on the Elbow and Wednesday morning on the Bow. At this point, river flows are not expected to cause widespread overbank flooding. Click here to continue reading

Update on spring flooding (June 14, 4:30 p.m.)

PUBLISHED: 15 June 2022

Government of Alberta

The province is preparing for potential flooding in central and southern Alberta. States of local emergency are declared in Calgary and the Municipal District of Bighorn. Click here to continue reading

State of local emergency declared in Kelowna, B.C. in response to flooding

PUBLISHED: 15 June 2022

Global News

A local state of emergency has been issued in Kelowna, B.C., due to isolated flooding. Central Okanagan Emergency Operations declared the local state of emergency just after 2 p.m., on Tuesday afternoon, stating it was doing so due to flooding along Mission Creek, Scotty Creek and the upper reaches of Mill Creek. Click here to continue reading

Berm across Memorial Drive completed, but city optimistic with improved forecast

PUBLISHED: 15 June 2022

CTV News

A massive berm is now completed across Memorial Drive in Calgary and will better protect the community of Sunnyside should the Bow River breach its banks, but the protection may not be needed as the city’s rain forecast improves, officials said. The Elbow River is expected to peak Tuesday evening. On the Bow River, current models show the river will peak some time on Wednesday morning. River flows are not expected to cause significant overland flooding, the city says, and the Bow River isn’t expected to reach levels that would prompt evacuations. Click here to continue reading

Snow hits mountain parks as avalanche risk rises

PUBLISHED: 15 June 2022

CTV News

While Calgary and its surrounding communities are being inundated with rain, the mountain parks are seeing snow. A lot of it. Peter Lougheed Provincial Park got hit hard over the last few days as cooler temperatures turned a forecast of big rain into a late spring snowstorm. As a result, campgrounds and trail heads that would normally be jammed with hikers at this time of the year are deserted. Click here to continue reading

Bow River in Calgary under ‘high streamflow advisory’ as forecast improves

PUBLISHED: 15 June 2022

CTV News

The City of Calgary is still watching the water levels of the Bow and Elbow rivers, but the outlook has improved when it comes to the potential for overland flooding. According to data from the province, the Bow River is now under a high streamflow advisory as opposed to a flood watch. Evacuations of areas along the rivers are not anticipated in Calgary, but the Calgary Police Service says it has a plan in place if weather conditions and water levels take a turn for the worse. Click here to continue reading

Flood watches and high streamflow advisories in Foothills County

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

CTV News

Flood watches and high streamflow advisories have been issued in the Municipal District of Foothills County. The county sits immediately south of Calgary and covers 3,600 square kilometres including Okotoks, High River, Turner Valley, Black Diamond, Longview and the Eden Valley Indian Reserve. A Monday release from county officials indicated the area is expected to see a “prolonged and significant rainfall” from June 13 through until June 15. Click here to continue reading

Fernie, B.C. on flood alert as Elk River expected to rise

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

CTV News

The City of Fernie in southeast B.C. is keeping tabs on the level of the Elk River and has closed several trails that are susceptible to flooding. B.C.’s River Forecast Centre issued a flood warning for the Elk River and flood watches for the Upper Columbia, West Kootenay and East Kootenay regions. Late Monday morning, city officials announced that the Elk River was at a level consistent with regular spring freshet, but there is potential for flooding as heavy rain is forecasted for the area. Click here to continue reading

Could used beer yeast be the solution to heavy metal contamination in water?

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

Science Daily

A new analysis by researchers at MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA) has found that inactive yeast could be effective as an inexpensive, abundant, and simple material for removing lead contamination from drinking water supplies. The study shows that this approach can be efficient and economic, even down to part-per-billion levels of contamination. Serious damage to human health is known to occur even at these low levels. Click here to continue reading

City of Calgary declares State of Local Emergency in response to heavy rainfall

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

City of Calgary

With the forecasted rainfall, and out of an abundance of caution, we are taking steps to ensure Calgarians are safe. Over the last 24 hours, forecast conditions in the Kananaskis region and Calgary have not improved, with the potential for more severe weather than originally anticipated. At this point, river flows are not expected to cause widespread overbank flooding, however, as mentioned by the mayor we today are announcing a State of Local Emergency (SOLE) effective immediately and opening the Emergency Operation Centre to lead coordination and response efforts and are taking several steps to protect critical infrastructure and the safety of citizens. Click here to continue reading

Flood watch issued for Waterton Lakes National Park

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

CTV News

Officials say there is some flooding in lower, flood-prone areas along the shoreline of Waterton Lakes. The flow rate and level is also above average in the Waterton River and Belly River. The snowpack is about 37 per cent higher than normal right now, thanks to cooler temperatures seen in the spring. About 20 millimetres of rain has fallen at Waterton Lakes National Park in the last 48 hours and another 10-20 mm is expected in the coming days. Click here to continue reading

City activates Emergency Operations Centre in anticipation of flooding

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

City of Red Deer

The City of Red Deer has activated the Emergency Operations Centre in preparation for potential flooding that could impact our community over the next 24 to 72 hours. At this time, a flood warning is not in effect for the Red Deer River and The City, however we anticipate rising water levels over the coming 24 to 72 hours. City staff are monitoring for the potential for rising river levels, and assessing the potential impacts including to infrastructure such as parks, trails and roadways. No evacuation alerts or orders have been issued. All boat launches into the river are closed, and residents are asked to stay off the river as conditions could change quickly. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Record flooding and mudslides force closure of Yellowstone national park

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

The Guardian

Record flooding and rockslides following a burst of heavy rains prompted the rare closure on Monday of all five entrances to Yellowstone national park at the start of the summer tourist season, the park superintendent said. The entire park, spanning parts of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, will remain closed to visitors, including those with lodging and camping reservations, at least through Wednesday, as officials assess damage to roads, bridges and other facilities. Click here to continue reading

Much of southern B.C. under flood warnings as storm approaches

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The emergency operations centre in the British Columbia community of Fernie has been activated as heavy rain pounds the area and a flood warning has been posted for the nearby Elk River. Flood warnings, watches or high streamflow advisories cover much of southern B.C. and Environment Canada said Fernie would be the centre of a rainstorm bringing 50 to 80 millimetres before it tapered to showers Tuesday. Click here to continue reading

Stretch of Calgary’s Memorial Drive closed due to flood concerns

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

CTV News

The City of Calgary has closed a 14-block section of Memorial Drive to accommodate flood mitigation work. The closure went into effect late Monday and stretches from Edmonton Trail N.E. to 10th Street N.W. The area is considered to be at significant risk of flooding if the Bow River breaches its banks. The city declared a state of local emergency on Monday afternoon as upward of 100mm of rain — the typical average for Calgary for the entire month of June — was expected to fall from Monday through Wednesday. Click here to continue reading

Foothills Rainfall Warning

PUBLISHED: 14 June 2022

A rainfall warning is in place for the Alberta foothills region for Monday June 13th through Wednesday June 15th.

Foothills regions from Banff and Kananaskis to the Calgary area are anticipating greater than 100mm of rain. This extreme rainfall event, coupled with a snow pillow that is much above average for mid-June, may create a risk of flooding along the lower regions of Bow, Elbow, Sheep and Highwood Rivers if the situation escalates.

On Sunday, operators began releasing water from some reservoirs, notably Glenmore Reservoir, in preparation for the storm. Elbow River flows on Sunday at 5 pm at the confluence with the Bow River were 54 m3/s, more than 10 times higher than the flows were at this location one day earlier.

Successive weather models have been variable with respect to location and amounts, so the rainfall amounts and location are still subject to change.

The WaterPortal will continue to monitor and provide updates on the situation as it evolves. For updates on current river flows, visit https://rivers.alberta.ca/.

Helpful Resources

Detailed weather forecasts and current weather information are available from:Alberta Agriculture and Forestryhttps://wildfire.alberta.ca/wildfire-status/fire-weather/forecasts-observations/default.aspxEnvironment Canada and Climate Changehttps://weather.gc.ca/forecast/canada/index_e.html?id=AB
If you are in Calgary and concerned about flooding in your area, we’re sharing links to flood-related resources and current river conditions:

Learn more about river flow rates – what is normal, and when flooding begins, at the City’s River Flow Rates webpage.

Alberta Environment expects Red Deer River water levels to rise over next few weeks

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

Red Deer Advocate

The low water flow on the Red Deer River is expected to change soon. Alberta Environment confirmed through Twitter on Thursday there’s still lots of snowpack left in the mountains, which is melting two or three weeks later than usual, due to a cool spring. This mountain meltwater is expected to make its way into the Red Deer River and other provincial waterways over the coming weeks as the weather warms, bringing most rivers back in line with seasonal averages. Click here to continue reading

Ancient ice samples from highest mountain in Canada may reveal past climate secrets

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

CBC News

Ice core samples from Canada’s highest mountain, now in storage at the University of Alberta, may provide scientists with answers about Earth’s climate thousands of years ago. The samples, from an ice core drilled 327 metres deep on Mount Logan, Yukon, are in 35 cardboard boxes, each about the size of a mini fridge. The boxes arrived in Edmonton last week and are now in freezer storage at the U of A’s department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Click here to continue reading

On the bank of a swelling South Nahanni River, this N.W.T. community is preparing for the worst

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

CBC News

The community of 93 people, which lies next to the point where the South Nahanni River joins the Liard River, was put on high alert for flooding this week. The N.W.T. government also warned the same in Fort Liard, citing snowmelt from the mountains in B.C., Yukon, and the N.W.T. The South Nahanni River rose between two to three inches overnight. A water monitoring bulletin issued Friday evening said the flow on the Liard River had increased steadily over the past couple of days. Click here to continue reading

Rain brings ‘widespread relief’ to Central Alberta farmers: Alberta Crop Report

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Central Alberta crop reporters were communicating widespread relief with this past week’s rains, according to the provincial government. Most areas in Alberta’s Central region had five to 30 millimetres of rain, the government said in the latest Alberta Crop Report, which features crop conditions as of this past Friday. Sixty per cent of surface soil moisture in the central region of Alberta is now rated as good or excellent. Crop seeding is 100 per cent complete. About 94 per cent of major crops have emerged which is the highest level of all regions in the province. There are reports of canola reseeding due to frost. Click here to continue reading

City of Calgary issues boating advisory for Elbow River as we prepare for significant rainfall

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

City of Calgary 

The City of Calgary is closely monitoring significant rainfall in the forecast for the Kananaskis region, west of Calgary, with potentially as much as 75-100 mm expected by Wednesday morning. This amount of rain has the potential to quickly raise flow rates on the Bow and Elbow Rivers. In response, on June 12, 2022, effective immediately, The City of Calgary is issuing a boating advisory for the Elbow River, due to higher expected flow rates and the current forecast. Calgarians are advised against boating and all other watercraft activities on the Elbow River during this time. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba Government provides additional $3M in watershed districts program

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

Water Canada

The Watershed Districts Program is a voluntary partnership between Manitoba and municipal governments based on local, grassroots decision-making. This year, the province will expand program support by $570,000, for a total of $6.443 million. The Manitoba government is also establishing the Manitoba Watershed Districts Capacity Fund. Annual revenues from this new $2.5 million fund will provide a stable source of funding to support technical work, operations, communications, governance and watershed planning efforts for districts and the Manitoba Association of Watersheds. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Iraq’s Lake Sawa dries up amid water crisis

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

This year, for the first time in its centuries−long history, the lake dried up. A combination of mismanagement by local investors, government neglect and climate change has ground down its azure shores to chunks of salt. Lake Sawa is only the latest casualty in this broad country−wide struggle with water shortages that experts say is induced by climate change, including record low rainfall and back−to−back drought. Click here to continue reading

High streamflow advisory issued for many B.C. rivers

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A high streamflow advisory has been issued by the River Forecast Centre for some of the same British Columbia rivers where flooding last November ripped away roads and devastated communities. The centre says snowmelt above the North Thompson River in central B.C. will send a “pulse” of water downstream toward the Fraser River. It says while the water level is expected to rise, no significant rain or heat is in the forecast that would produce major increases in flow through the river. Click here to continue reading

Flood warnings issued for Banff, Canmore and Exshaw

PUBLISHED: 13 June 2022

CTV News

Significant rainfall and an above-average snowpack in Alberta’s mountain parks has prompted flood warnings for communities along the Bow River. As of Monday morning, flood warnings are in place for the towns of Banff and Canmore, and the hamlet of Exshaw. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Extreme, severe drought impacting the upper Colorado River basin in the second century, new study finds

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

Science Daily

The Colorado River is in an extremely severe drought and has been for the last 22 years. To better understand this drought, researchers looked at the drought history within the Colorado River Basin. Previous studies have gone back 1,200 years, but this paper goes back 2,000 years. The findings, using paleo hydrology, show that there was an even more severe drought in the Colorado River Basin in the second century. Click here to continue reading

High streamflow advisory for B.C.’s lower Fraser River, snowpack remains high

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

Sylvan Lake News

Increasing snowmelt and wet weather have led to a high streamflow advisory for several British Columbia communities along the lower Fraser River. The River Forecast Centre says the advisory applies to areas from Quesnel downstream, including Big Bar, Boston Bar and the Fraser Valley from Hope to the ocean. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Triple La Niña’: Australia may face another summer of flooding rains, US expert warns

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

The Guardian

Australia’s east coast could be hit by a rare “triple La Niña” that brings flooding rains and cooler weather for the third summer in a row, a senior US government scientist says. Experts say the prospect of a triple La Niña is real, but there is disagreement between different computer models and Australia could yet avoid a return of summer floods. Click here to continue reading

Flooded communities in northwest now eligible for Ontario disaster recovery funding

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

CBC News

The province will provide disaster recovery financial assistance to northwestern Ontario communities where spring flooding has damaged homes, buildings and infrastructure in recent weeks. The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing announced Thursday the aid applies to the Rainy River district and parts of the Kenora district. In a news release, the ministry said heavy precipitation and snow melt are behind the flooding, which has affected areas including Fort Frances, Sioux Lookout, Kenora, Ignace and Ear Falls. Click here to continue reading

Wetter weather increases interest in tile drainage on eastern Prairies

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

The Western Producer

Environment Canada data shows that 268 millimetres of rain and snow fell on Winnipeg in April and May, making it the second wettest April and May on record. Installers of drainage tile were busy in Manitoba and other parts of the Prairies for much of the 2010s because excess rain and saturated soils were common problems for many farmers. Click here to continue reading

Alberta misses May moisture, gains seeding time

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

The Western Producer

Alberta has been largely spared the deluge of precipitation that has hit Manitoba and parts of Saskatchewan this spring. Now, an early June heavy rain across the southern part of the province has provided relief to areas experiencing deteriorating moisture conditions. Most major crops in southern and central Alberta were reporting as more than half seeded in the middle of May with nearly all fully complete by the end of the month. Click here to continue reading

Seeding plans float away

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

The Western Producer

The quickest thing to evaporate on the eastern Prairies this spring has been farmers’ seeding plans. On many farms in southeastern Saskatchewan and most of Manitoba, farmers are engaged in a great switcheroo from one crop to another and one variety to the next as they wrestle with wet fields, expiring crop insurance deadlines and low seed stocks. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Using phosphorus from sewage could help with soaring food bills, says report

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

The Guardian

Sewage could provide a novel way of helping consumers with soaring food bills and reducing pollution in our waterways – if sewage plants separated out phosphorus, a vital ingredient of fertiliser, according to a new report. Phosphorus, found naturally in all plants, is essential for growing plants but its use as a fertiliser is creating widespread pollution in developed countries, because much of it is wasted. Click here to continue reading

‘We are salmon people’: First Nation leaders in B.C. demand audience with fisheries minister

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

It’s been nearly five years since Tribal Chief Tyrone McNeil has pulled salmon from the Fraser River and strung fish over wooden racks to dry in the wind, preserving food for his family and his people’s ancestral traditions. He and other First Nations leaders and communities in B.C. dependent on salmon are grieving the ongoing disappearance of the fish that defines them. Click here to continue reading

City of Whitehorse improving water and wastewater services

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

Water Canada

The City of Whitehorse is investing over $5.1 million of its portion of the Canada Community-Building Fund, formerly known as the Gas Tax Fund, to purchase equipment to upgrade services and start water and wastewater projects across the city. This includes reconstruction work on the Alaska Highway to connect Hillcrest to Whitehorse’s water supply network. The new water main will ensure that the growing neighbourhood will have improved access to reliable drinking water. Click here to continue reading

BC’s Carl Data Solutions wastewater system software chosen for Los Angeles County sanitation districts

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

Water Canada

Vancouver’s Carl Data Solutions has announced that the The Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts has selected FlowWorks software for real-time reporting and analytics on a wastewater system that services 5.6 million people. The California agency has awarded a two-year contract after which it is renewable on an annual basis. This is the largest sale of FlowWorks to any Carl Data Solutions customer. Click here to continue reading

B.C. residents living in flood zones should pack a bag for quick exit

PUBLISHED: 10 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Officials in British Columbia are urging residents of communities at elevated risk of flooding to be prepared if water levels rise due to rapidly melting snow and too much rain. May and June are the wet part of the year for the B.C. Interior, from the southern Rockies all the way up to Yukon, so the focus over the next few weeks will be to watch for heavy rain or prolonged heat. Click here to continue reading

Forecast centre says river in northeast B.C. could surge to flood conditions

PUBLISHED: 09 June 2022

Ponoka News

The River Forecast Centre is warning residents of northeastern British Columbia that the Liard River could surge to extremely high flows, creating flood conditions similar to last year. The forecast centre upgraded the river conditions to a flood warning on Tuesday for the area that includes tributaries around Fort Nelson and Highway 97 towards Watson Lake. Click here to continue reading

Niagara Region wins best tasting tap water at provincial water conference

PUBLISHED: 09 June 2022

Water Canada

Niagara Region entered the Taste Test competition at the Ontario Water Works Association (OWWA) Conference, with a sample from the Niagara Falls Water Treatment Plant in hopes of bringing home gold. Conference delegates selected Niagara Region’s sample as best tasting tap water! The OWWA conference took place in early May in Niagara Falls. The Taste Test competition allowed the more than 1,000 attendees from across Ontario to sample drinking water from varying utilities across Ontario who entered the competition and cast their vote. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Portugal baked under severe drought in May

PUBLISHED: 09 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Almost the whole of Portugal was in severe drought at the end of May, the country’s weather service said Thursday. The month of May was the hottest in the southern European country for the last 92 years, weather service IPMA said in its monthly climate report. The average temperature of just over 19 C (66 F) was more than 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than usual, it said. Click here to continue reading

‘15-20 structures’ flooded in northwest B.C., as flood risk continues

PUBLISHED: 08 June 2022

Sylvan Lake News

The emergency program coordinator in northwestern British Columbia says 15 to 20 structures are heavily flooded in three communities where an evacuation order has been issued. Flood watches were posted Sunday for the Dean River in the Fraser Plateau east of Bella Coola and for the Liard River and its tributaries around the northeastern B.C. community of Fort Nelson and along Highway 97 toward Watson Lake. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Microplastics found in freshly fallen Antarctic snow for first time

PUBLISHED: 08 June 2022

The Guardian

Microplastics have been found in freshly fallen snow in Antarctica for the first time, which could accelerate snow and ice melting and pose a threat to the health of the continent’s unique ecosystems. The tiny plastics – smaller than a grain of rice – have previously been found in Antarctic sea ice and surface water but this is the first time it has been reported in fresh snowfall, the researchers say. Click here to continue reading

Vancouver’s first floating habitat brings biodiversity to Trout Lake

PUBLISHED: 08 June 2022

Water Canada

On June 6, 2022, Vancouver’s first floating ecosystem was assembled and launched onto Trout Lake as a pilot to improve biodiversity, plant and wildlife habitat in John Hendry Park. Made from sustainable, non-toxic materials, the 60 square metre island is constructed from a series of interlocking platforms, and planted with native species such as sedges and rushes to support plant and animal life above and below the surface of the water. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Industrial water use threatens Louisiana capital’s drinking water

PUBLISHED: 08 June 2022

The Guardian

The city pulls its water deep underground from the Southern Hills aquifer, which requires little to no treatment to drink, unlike other Louisiana communities such as New Orleans, which draws its water from the Mississippi River and requires heavy treatment. But the pristine water source for the predominantly Black city of Baton Rouge is facing a serious and worsening threat from over pumping: saltwater intrusion. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Only God can help’: Hundreds die as Somalia faces drought-induced famine

PUBLISHED: 08 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Deaths have begun in the region’s most parched drought in four decades. Previously unreported data shared with The Associated Press show at least 448 deaths this year at malnutrition treatment centers in Somalia alone. Authorities in Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya are now shifting to the grim task of trying to prevent famine. Click here to continue reading

Calgary’s great June flood of 1929

PUBLISHED: 08 June 2022

Calgary Herald

Over the years, long-time Herald researcher/librarian Norma Marr prepared a feature called The H Files, in which she looked back at a myriad of Calgary news events. This instalment recalled the significant flooding experienced by Calgary and southern Alberta in June 1929. Click here to continue reading

Recent rain came at a good time for area farmers

PUBLISHED: 07 June 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Many Central Alberta farmers got much-needed rain in the last few days. Seeding is pretty much complete in the central region and about two-thirds of crops have emerged. Surface soil moisture percentages are much better than the southern areas of the province, with 69 per cent of soil moisture rated fair or good in the region, which covers an area from Rimbey to Airdrie and Coronation to Oyen. Click here to continue reading

West Coast kelp is in hot water, but scientific insights may help save our underwater rainforests

PUBLISHED: 07 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

B.C.’s critical kelp forests withered as climate change has triggered marine heat waves along the entire West Coast in recent years. But exceptions to the rule may provide insights helpful to saving and restoring our underwater forests, said Samuel Starko, a University of Victoria researcher. Kelp forests don’t all respond the same way to incidents of extreme marine heat, such as the two-year event starting in 2014 ominously known as “The Blob,” Starko said. Click here to continue reading

NB gets cyanobacteria signage at ponds, lakes, and rivers to educate public

PUBLISHED: 07 June 2022

Water Canada

The provincial government has partnered with communities and organizations to install new cyanobacteria signage at ponds, lakes and rivers throughout New Brunswick. Cyanobacteria, which includes blue-green algae, are naturally occurring bacteria found in many bodies of water. They are not normally visible, but under certain conditions, can increase in numbers to form visible surface blooms or benthic mats. The signs will describe cyanobacteria and inform the public on how to stay safe. A new cyanobacteria web page has also been created. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flood alerts issued as more torrential rain forecast to hit China

PUBLISHED: 07 June 2022

The Guardian

Record-breaking rains that have battered parts of China and east Asia in the last week are expected to worsen, with authorities warning of an increased risk of floods. In the first week of China’s flood season, extreme rainfalls have caused floods and landslides, destroyed roads and infrastructure, and led to the deaths of at least 15 people. Click here to continue reading

Dry spring means no mosquitoes — but is a water shortage looming?

PUBLISHED: 06 June 2022

Red Deer Advocate

The City of Red Deer’s mosquito control crews are cooling their heels during this very dry start to June. With virtually no mosquitoes to worry about, Ken Lehman, the city’s parks ecological services operations co-ordinator, said his crews are “still on stand-by” and have not had to spread the organic mosquito control agent, Bti. Click here to continue reading

Growing season off to a rocky start as Prairie farmers contend with rain, snow, flooding

PUBLISHED: 06 June 2022

CBC News

Seeding delays across much of the Prairies are raising concerns about potentially lower crop yields in a year when Canadian farmers are under pressure to deliver a strong harvest. The stakes are high for Canada’s agriculture industry in 2022, with the war in Ukraine spurring global food security fears and driving prices for commodities such as wheat and canola sky-high. Domestically, farmers also need to grow enough to break even financially. Click here to continue reading

Evacuation alerts issued for parts of B.C. with flood and thunderstorm watches in effect

PUBLISHED: 06 June 2022

CBC News

B.C.’s River Forecast Centre has issued a flood watch for parts of the province’s Interior as warming weather causes snowmelt and rising waters, while high streamflow advisories remain in place across much of northern B.C., prompting evacuation alerts in a number of small communities. The latest flood watches cover the East Okanagan River including Mission Creek and tributaries, the West Kettle River, and Spius Creek. A flood watch means river levels are rising and may exceed their banks and flood adjacent areas. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Whale watching season starts early as humpback population bounces back

PUBLISHED: 06 June 2022

The Guardian

People across Australia’s east coast are catching an earlier than expected first glimpse of breaching humpback whales as they migrate north, and scientists say the reason why is a conservation success story. Whale watchers were treated to a spectacular show in Sydney on Monday as two humpback whales surged from the water metres from their boat. Click here to continue reading

Calgary researchers release endangered tadpoles in B.C. wetlands

PUBLISHED: 06 June 2022

CBC News

Researchers with the Wilder Institute/Calgary Zoo have recently translocated more than a thousand tadpoles to wetland areas in southeastern B.C. Working with the B.C. Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Team, they’re hoping the project will help the endangered frog’s population in the province bounce back after years of declines. Researchers say there’s only one known surviving native population of northern leopard frogs in B.C. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Hidden world’ of marine life discovered in Antarctic ‘river’ under ice

PUBLISHED: 06 June 2022

The Guardian

Beneath a vast Antarctic ice shelf, in a cathedral-like cavern hundreds of metres high, are swarms of little shrimp-like creatures in a newly discovered underwater ecosystem that, until recently, had remained an ice-locked secret. A team of scientists from New Zealand discovered the ecosystem 500 metres below the ice in a suspected estuary, hundreds of kilometres from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. Click here to continue reading

Thousands of flood-damaged sites need repairs in Manitoba, tab already tens of millions and growing

PUBLISHED: 03 June 2022

CBC News

The devastation from the wettest Manitoba spring in over a century is still being catalogued, but officials say there are thousands of sites that need repairs, with a repair tab that is already into the tens of millions of dollars. Widespread flooding has stretched the province’s ability to respond on multiple fronts. In the Interlake, Peguis First Nation experienced a historic flood that damaged hundreds of homes and forced nearly 1,900 people to leave. Click here to continue reading

Boaters told to stay off low-flowing North Saskatchewan River in Edmonton

PUBLISHED: 03 June 2022

Global News

While the warm days may be tempting outdoor enthusiasts to hit the river in Edmonton, power boaters are being told to hold off due to very low water levels. A joint warning from Edmonton Fire Rescue, city police, park rangers and RCMP warned power boaters to stay off the North Saskatchewan River. Click here to continue reading

Developers’ ability to build in Okotoks to end without water solution, town warns

PUBLISHED: 03 June 2022

CBC News

Located on the edge of southern Alberta’s foothills and close to Calgary, the community of Okotoks has been a popular destination for people seeking a small-town feel not far from the big city. But the town, located roughly 47 kilometres south of Calgary, now estimates it only has nine years of development left before continued issues around getting a new water source force developers to put down their shovels. Click here to continue reading

Funding for expanded water and wastewater systems in Three Rivers, PEI

PUBLISHED: 03 June 2022

Water Canada

Funding will support the water and wastewater systems in the Town of Three Rivers by providing approximately 80 households with efficient and convenient distribution and collection services. Residents will benefit from the newly constructed 2500 metres of expanded sewer main and 2000 metres of water main by eliminating the need for individual septic tanks and well pumps. Once complete, the new infrastructure will help to preserve the health of residents, protect local soils and waterways from contamination, and improve property values. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Record low wild salmon catch in Scotland alarms ecologists

PUBLISHED: 03 June 2022

The Guardian

Salmon anglers have called for urgent action to protect Scotland’s wild salmon after the lowest number on record were caught last year. The latest official data shows that 35,693 Atlantic salmon were caught by anglers on Scottish rivers last year, the lowest number since records began in 1952 and just 75% of the average over the last five years. The figures for sea trout, a species that uses the same rivers as salmon, were also the lowest on record, at 12,636 and 77% of the latest five-year average. Click here to continue reading

Campbell River estuary is a restoration showcase to save salmon habitat from climate change

PUBLISHED: 03 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Jim Van Tine points out a grassy marsh bench sloping into a tranquil pond populated by ducks and ringed by a mix of salmonberry shrubs and alder and cottonwood trees at the heart of the Campbell River estuary. The site — Mill Pond in the Baikie Island Reserve — was an industrial wasteland little more than 20 years ago, stuffed full of log booms and surrounded by timber yards, Van Tine said. Click here to continue reading

Our wetlands are drowning

PUBLISHED: 03 June 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Schoenoplectus americanus, or the chairmaker’s bulrush, is a common wetland plant in the Americas, and it has an existential problem. It has chosen to live in a place where it is always at risk of being drowned. Like all plants, the bulrush requires oxygen to produce energy. One solution is obvious: Send shoots skyward like straws to suck down oxygen to the roots. But the bulrush also employs a more unusual strategy: raising the ground on which it grows. Click here to continue reading

AECOM to design replacement submarine potable water supply line for City of Yellowknife

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

Water Canada

AECOM announced it has been selected by the City of Yellowknife to provide engineering services for a replacement submarine potable water supply line. This work aims to reduce the risk of flooding in the community and better protect the drinking water supply during times of extreme weather. AECOM authored Yellowknife’s Potable Water Source Selection Study in 2017, which evaluated the city’s potable water supply options as the current pipeline reaches the end of its useful life. Click here to continue reading

Recent rain welcomed by Central Alberta farmers

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Many Central Alberta farmers got much-needed rain in the last week and seeding is ahead of schedule. Just under 86 per cent of major crops were seeded in the region as of May 24, according to the latest Alberta Crop Report. That is ahead of the five-year average of 81 per cent. Province-wide, 73 per cent of major crops have been seeded, which is below the five-year average of 77.3 per cent and the 10-year average of 82.4 per cent. Click here to continue reading

 

Compare and Contrast: Fishing industry still ‘bulldozing’ seabed in 90% of UK marine protected areas

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

The Guardian

More than 90% of Britain’s offshore marine protected areas are still being bottom-trawled and dredged, two years after analysis of the extent of destructive fishing exposed them as “paper parks”, according to data shared with the Guardian. The UK’s network of marine parks, set up to safeguard vulnerable areas of the seabed and marine life, is a cornerstone of the government’s target to protect 30% of ocean biodiversity by 2030. Click here to continue reading

Weeks after the flood, N.W.T. homesteaders tackle ’30-acre catastrophe’

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

CBC News

Flooding from the Hay River overwhelmed the small community of Paradise Gardens earlier this month. The agricultural area lies about halfway between Enterprise and Hay River. Days later, Hay River itself would be inundated prompting an unprecedented, middle of the night evacuation of the town’s nearly 4,000 residents. Click here to continue reading

Support for Saint John Airport wastewater infrastructure, setting the stage for further development

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

Water Canada

Through this funding the Saint John Airport Authority will make improvements to their existing wastewater treatment facility by switching from a chlorination disinfection system to a UV disinfection system. This will allow the system to treat more wastewater per day and to release cleaner water into the environment. Once completed, the improved wastewater treatment facility will feature a wastewater lift station, two pumping stations and one wastewater treatment plant. Click here to continue reading

Alberta needs cohesive flood planning: experts

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

CTV News

Communities in northern Alberta are seeing spring flooding and experts say Alberta must do more to prepare for flooding in the future. The Metis settlement of Paddle Prairie, home of around 800 people, has faced massive floods in recent weeks, and many homes were without running water. Ryan Ness, director of adaptation at the Canadian Climate Institute, said extreme weather and flooding are going to become more frequent in the future and damages can range from $1 billion per year currently to more than $10 billion a year by the end of the century, depending on the amount of climate change seen in Canada. Click here to continue reading

Wastewater surveillance provides crucial COVID data, but also carries privacy concerns: scientists

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

CBC Radio

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, wastewater surveillance and analysis became a key tool in monitoring and measuring the amount of virus in communities. But some experts caution that the data collected from these studies could also lead to privacy concerns, especially because samples are often gathered from public sources without individual consent. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Critical global water questions

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

Science Daily

Recent intense heatwaves in India and widespread US droughts have highlighted the need for a global approach to tackling chronic water shortages. Now, new research has drawn together expert voices from across the globe to help address current and future water challenges. Key areas identified include water scarcity, sanitation and climate dynamics. But the main concern is the way governments are equipped to deal with these challenges. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Dozens killed in Brazil after flooding from heavy rain

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

CBC News

Firefighters, volunteers and army officers work at the site where a house collapsed due to a landslide caused by heavy rains in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, on May 29, 2022. At least 44 people were killed after downpour lashed the country’s north. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Tiny Pacific island nation declares bold plan to protect 100% of its ocean

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

The Guardian

The Pacific island state of Niue has announced that it will protect 100% of the ocean in its exclusive economic zone (EEZ), which spans 317,500 sq km (122,000 sq miles), roughly the area of Vietnam. The water that surrounds one of the world’s largest raised coral atolls is the only place where the katuali is found – a sea snake that lives in the island’s honeycomb of underwater caves. Humpback whales migrate to Niue from Antarctica to give birth, spinner dolphins swim near the coast and Niue boasts the world’s highest density of grey reef sharks. Click here to continue reading

Hands-on wetlands learning for Charlottetown students

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

Water Canada

This week, more than 400 Grade 4 students from across the Island will head out onto a marsh for a hands-on learning experience with student mentors from Charlottetown Rural High School’s Wetland Centre of Excellence. Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) is inviting local media on these field trips to observe the significance and impact of environmental education. Wetland Centres of Excellence are a national network of schools and community partners where students lead wetland projects, peer-to-peer mentorship and community outreach. Click here to continue reading

What monitoring COVID through wastewater can (and can’t) tell us

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

Water Canada

As pandemic restrictions have eased, many Canadians have begun enjoying gathering again with family, friends, and colleagues in a more carefree manner. While smoother waters abound, the reality is that there are many moving parts working hard beneath the surface to keep us safe. Public health is carefully monitoring the Coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by the SARS-Coronavirus, and its variants. With limited polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing available and recognized limitations of rapid antigen tests (RATs), wastewater surveillance has become Canada’s best tool to track emerging cases. Click here to continue reading

Graham joint venture awarded Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant Renewal Project

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

Water Canada

Graham and its joint venture partner Aecon have been awarded the $273M construction contract for the Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant Renewal Project by the Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Corporation. This award follows the joint venture’s successful completion of Phase I early contractor involvement, which included engineering, constructability and pre-construction services for the same project. Click here to continue reading

Robot buoys track Atlantic right whales’ sounds to warn ships

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A Cape Cod science center and one of the world’s largest shipping businesses are collaborating on a project to use robotic buoys to protect a vanishing whale from lethal collisions with ships. A lab at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution developed the technology, which uses buoys and underwater gliders to record whale sounds in near real time. Click here to continue reading

Dry spring forcing some Alberta cattle ranchers to evaluate their herds

PUBLISHED: 31 May 2022

CBC News

After last year’s summer drought prompted many Alberta cattle ranchers to cull their herds, ongoing dry weather this winter and spring, especially in the southern part of the province, could mean more of the same. High feed costs combined with not enough moisture to sustain grass for grazing means some ranchers are assessing how many cattle they can realistically keep. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Technology pulls drinking water from the air, 24 hours a day, with no energy input

PUBLISHED: 26 May 2022

The Brighter Side of News

Fresh water is scarce in many parts of the world and must be obtained at great expense. Communities near the ocean can desalinate sea water for this purpose, but doing so requires a large amount of energy. Further away from the coast, practically often the only remaining option is to condense atmospheric humidity through cooling, either through processes that similarly require high energy input or by using “passive” technologies that exploit the temperature swing between day and night. Click here to continue reading

Carl Data Solutions launches Auto Inflow and Infiltration software as part of its new generation of AI-enabled predictive analytics technology

PUBLISHED: 26 May 2022

Water Canada

Carl Data Solutions Inc. has announced the general availability of Auto I&I, its latest predictive analytics software product for smart city and industrial infrastructure applications that takes advantage of advanced Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning automation. Auto I&I was successfully Beta-tested with Carl Data Solutions’ partner AECOM in York Region’s long-term flow monitoring program – one of the largest and most advanced flow and rainfall monitoring programs in North America. Click here to continue reading

Assessing the risk of drinking water contamination during flooding

PUBLISHED: 26 May 2022

Water Canada

Québec has seen record flooding in recent years. In addition to causing property damage and psychological impacts, flooding can pose a significant health risk, particularly due to contamination of drinking water sources. Professor Geneviève Bordeleau of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) is leading a research project to better protect communities and boost their resilience by enabling them to manage vulnerable drinking water sources more effectively in the event of flooding. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The road to success when it comes to mitigating flood disasters

PUBLISHED: 26 May 2022

Science Daily

Australia has experienced one of the worst flood disasters on record in the eastern states this year, with 23 people killed, thousands left homeless, and a damage bill expected to top $1.5 billion. Climate change aside, increasing urban development is escalating the potential flood risks and adding to the likelihood of a projected $10 billion hole in the economy by 2050 unless urgent action is taken. Click here to continue reading

Winnipeg River, already flowing at a record volume, slated to rise even higher

PUBLISHED: 26 May 2022

CBC News

The Winnipeg River is flowing at a record volume in Manitoba because officials no longer have any other option to control flooding across a vast swath of northwestern Ontario and northern Minnesota. Flooding on the Winnipeg River, which is running at about 3.5 times its usual volume at this time of year, has already forced hundreds of people from their homes and washed out roads in Whiteshell Provincial Park. Click here to continue reading

B.C. fish farms cultivate increased risks for wild salmon, new studies show

PUBLISHED: 26 May 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Pacific salmon are likely exposed to increased risks from pathogens concentrated in fish farms on the West Coast, two new scientific studies indicate. Young Fraser River sockeye salmon migrating past fish farms in the Discovery Islands were more than 12 times more likely to carry a potentially harmful bacteria, Tenacibaculum maritimum, than in other areas, according to a study published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: More floods forecast for Australia’s east as La Niña weather pattern lingers

PUBLISHED: 26 May 2022

The Guardian

The breakdown of the La Niña weather pattern in the Pacific has stalled while a key Indian Ocean climate driver is tilting towards its wetter phase, making it more likely that eastern Australia will face more heavy rain and floods. Just as the Bureau of Meteorology released a special climate report on the extreme rainfall and flooding that hit parts of south-eastern Queensland, northern New South Wales and the region around Sydney in February and March, its fortnightly report on climate influences pointed to the big wet extending for months to come. Click here to continue reading

Fuel contamination the next concern in flood-ravaged Hay River, N.W.T.

PUBLISHED: 25 May 2022

CBC News

Fuel drums, an upside down truck and an entire house are among the items scattered across parts of West Point First Nation and West Channel in Hay River, N.W.T., after significant flooding last week. Community members are trying to pick up the pieces after devastating flooding prompted an evacuation order for about 4,000 people in the area and now people like Janice Moore are worried about fuel contamination. Click here to continue reading

Farming experts say moisture in Lethbridge area offering some relief from wind erosion

PUBLISHED: 25 May 2022

Global News

Dry and windy conditions in the Lethbridge area have been posing some challenges for the county and area farmers. Experts say unusually strong spring gusts have contributed to sandblasting of emerging seedlings and loss of topsoil. Click here to continue reading

Community meeting held to discuss proposed feedlot near popular Alberta lake

PUBLISHED: 25 May 2022

Global News

Community members and land owners at a popular lake southwest of Edmonton gathered Saturday evening to voice their concerns about a feedlot proposed in their community. A feedlot owner near Pigeon Lake has applied to expand his operation by 4,000 head of cattle. Some who live and visit the area are worried the proposed feedlot threatens the water quality of the lake, among other environmental concerns. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: California threatens ‘mandatory water restrictions’ if people don’t cut back

PUBLISHED: 25 May 2022

The Guardian

California could face mandatory water restrictions if residents don’t use less on their own as the drought drags on and the hotter summer months approach, the state’s governor has said. Gavin Newsom threatened the possibility of statewide mandates in a meeting with representatives from major water agencies, including those that supply Los Angeles, San Diego, and the San Francisco Bay Area, according to his office. The Democratic governor has avoided issuing sweeping mandatory cuts in water use and instead favored an approach that gives local water agencies power to set rules for water use in the cities and towns they supply. Click here to continue reading

Join the conversation on drought resilience and water saving strategies

PUBLISHED: 25 May 2022

City of Calgary

Starting today, The City of Calgary is inviting Calgarians to share their thoughts on The City’s Drought Resilience Plan, which will include a range of potential strategies that will help protect our water supply, create more drought resilient yards and landscapes, and encourage even more outdoor water conservation. More than 1.3 million people rely on the Bow and Elbow Rivers for all our water needs. Click here to continue reading

No significant flood risk for Calgary this spring: emergency officials

PUBLISHED: 25 May 2022

Calgary Herald

Calgary doesn’t face a significant flood risk this year, according to city emergency officials. Despite high mountain snowmelt that’s an estimated 20 to 40 percent larger than usual, forecasts for the upcoming months suggest there are currently no flooding concerns for the season, the city council’s emergency management committee heard Tuesday. Click here to continue reading

Nova Scotia releases public education campaign on blue-green algae

PUBLISHED: 20 May 2022

Water Canada

A new public education campaign will help Nova Scotians become more aware of blue-green algae when enjoying the province’s outdoors with the arrival of warmer weather. Cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, are naturally occurring in freshwaters like lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams. They can flourish in water high in nutrients, especially during hot, dry conditions. The bacteria can be harmful to people and fatal for animals, so it is important that Nova Scotians know what to look for and how to protect themselves, their families, and pets. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Pharmacy in the sea: Dolphins ‘use coral as medicine for skin ailments’

PUBLISHED: 20 May 2022

The Guardian

Who doesn’t like a bath scrub? Dolphins definitely do: they are known for being clever, playful, tactile animals, and they like to rub against rough surfaces, nap in coral beds and soak on sponges like guests at an underwater spa. However, dolphins may be getting more from their bath scrubs than just relaxation and leisure. A study published today suggests that bottlenose dolphins may be self-medicating their skin ailments with the help of corals, adding to growing research on their previously unexplored medicinal properties. Click here to continue reading

How Atlantic Canada’s warming ocean could impact everything from seaweed to lobster

PUBLISHED: 20 May 2022

CBC News

An Atlantic Canadian biotechnology seafood company says it’s seeing the effects of warming ocean temperatures as levels of the cold-water seaweed it harvests have plunged in one area. Acadian Seaplants converts the seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum into ingredients used in many food, household and fertilizer products. But the southern range of Ascophyllum in Massachusetts is now far less productive than it used to be, according to Acadian Seaplants CEO J.P. Deveau. Click here to continue reading

Flood fight ramps up in Minnedosa amid heavy rainfall

PUBLISHED: 20 May 2022

CBC News

The flood fight continues in parts of western Manitoba. And with a rainfall warning in place due to a weather system expected to bring 30 to 40 millimetres by Friday morning, people in the southwestern town of Minnedosa were frantically sandbagging and pumping water throughout a downpour Thursday, as the Little Saskatchewan River inched higher. Right now, volunteers are using sandbags to reinforce dikes on the north and south sides of the river to hold the water back from nearby homes and businesses. Click here to continue reading

For wetland plants, sea level rise stamps out benefits of higher CO2

PUBLISHED: 20 May 2022

Water Canada

Wetlands across the globe are in danger of drowning from rising seas. But for decades, scientists held out hope that another aspect of climate change — rising carbon dioxide (CO2) — could trigger extra plant growth, enabling coastal wetlands to grow fast enough to outpace sea-level rise. That helpful side effect is disappearing, they discovered in a new study. Conserving wetlands is critical both to fight climate change and adapt to it. Besides providing habitat, wetlands sequester massive amounts of carbon and protect people from some of climate change’s more extreme effects, such as hurricanes and typhoons. Click here to continue reading

Co-Operators renews commitment to building flood resilience

PUBLISHED: 20 May 2022

Water Canada

Co-operators has renewed its multi-year funding commitment to Partners for Action (P4A), a research initiative at the University of Waterloo that focuses on empowering Canadians to become flood resilient, with a three-year commitment of $500,000 towards program delivery and research. The increasing frequency and severity of extreme weather and its devastating impacts are top of mind for Canadians after the severe flooding in British Columbia late in 2021, and more recently the flooding in Manitoba. Click here to continue reading

Community to meet to discuss proposed feedlot near fragile Alberta recreational lake

PUBLISHED: 20 May 2022

CTV News

Cottage owners and farmers who say a proposed feedlot threatens the water quality of a popular lake are to gather this weekend to discuss how they can keep making their case to the regulatory body that will rule on the project. Pigeon Lake is unusual in that it’s fed by runoff, not streams or rivers, and is drained by a single creek. That makes the lake highly vulnerable to algal blooms fed by nutrients washing into its waters. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The Lasting Agreement – California’s long legacy of trying to solve its water problem

PUBLISHED: 19 May 2022

Comstock’s Magazine

If there’s one thing people in the West know how to fight over, it’s water. California was built on scarcity, whether it be gold or silver, land or water. In the mid-1800s, when European Americans arrived to the land where Indigenous people had lived for at least 10,000 years, they wasted no time staking their claims. A big head-scratcher for those early colonizers was how to get water to sustain burgeoning towns. California’s hydrology didn’t match where people wanted to live. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Climate change will force big shift in timing, amount of snowmelt across Colorado River Basin

PUBLISHED: 19 May 2022

Science Daily

New research predicts that changes in mountain snowmelt will shift peak streamflows to much earlier in the year for the vast Colorado River Basin, altering reservoir management and irrigation across the entire region. The basin stretches from sea level at the Gulf of California to higher than 14,000 feet in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and provides critical water to cities and farmers within the basin and beyond. Significant water is diverted to large population centers, including Albuquerque, Denver, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, San Diego and Santa Fe. Click here to continue reading

York research team removes harmful waste from Canada’s groundwater

PUBLISHED: 18 May 2022

Water Canada

An internationally recognized leader in the development of novel green technologies, Professor Satinder Kaur Brar, Lassonde School of Engineering, is on a mission to add value to residues and remove toxic compounds from the environment that pose extreme hazards to ecological and human health. Brar’s research hinges on two main themes: the removal of emerging contaminants such as plastics, chemical antibiotics, and pesticides from wastewater and drinking supply water; and value-addition of wastes. Click here to continue reading

SFU researchers mapping landslides that could wipe out Fraser River salmon

PUBLISHED: 18 May 2022

Water Canada

On Nov. 1, 2018, the Big Bar landslide in British Columbia blocked the Fraser River, prevented salmon from getting back to their spawning grounds in the Upper Fraser Basin and threatened the future of the species. Remediation efforts are still ongoing, but researchers led by SFU are back at Big Bar to map the effects of the slide. Their work is part of a larger project aimed at assessing and mitigating the risk of landslides to critically important salmon in the Fraser River. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Accidental discovery that scallops love ‘disco’ lights leads to new fishing technique

PUBLISHED: 18 May 2022

The Guardian

An unusual technique for catching scallops that was stumbled upon accidentally by scientists could potentially reduce some of the damage caused to our seabeds by fishing. The marine scientist Dr Rob Enever and his team at Fishtek Marine, a fisheries consultancy based in Devon, designed small underwater “potlights” to help protect fish stocks by replacing the need to use fish to bait crab and lobster pots. Click here to continue reading

This First Nation was on water advisories for 24 years. Now, its treatment plant has won an award

PUBLISHED: 18 May 2022

CBC News

A northwestern Ontario First Nation that was under a boil-water advisory for 24 years has received this year’s award for building the province’s best small drinking water system. The Ontario Public Works Association presented the 2022 Public Works Project of the Year for Small Municipalities and First Nations award to Shoal Lake #40 First Nation, at a ceremony in Mississauga, Ont., Tuesday. The award recognizes the new Shoal Lake #40 water treatment plant as having uniquely provided opportunities for local procurement and employment. Click here to continue reading

Hundreds in B.C. are still in urgent need of flood relief, community volunteers say

PUBLISHED: 18 May 2022

CBC News

In Abbotsford, 202 people remain in temporary lodging and are still unable to return to their homes, Mayor Henry Braun said. Across the province, at least 1,150 households are still displaced, according to Emergency Management B.C. These numbers only include those who have registered with the Red Cross and not those staying with family or friends, or are being supported by other means. But even those returning to their properties are facing extensive repairs, potentially gutting their homes, and counting the cost of their lost belongings — and, in some cases, livelihoods. Click here to continue reading

Central Alberta farmers hoping for some rain soon

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Central Alberta farmers are hoping to see rain and higher temperatures soon to give this year’s crop a push in the right direction. The Red Deer area seems to be right on the edge of the driest areas and has not got as much rain as land to the north. The start to the seeding season got pushed back a few days this year, both because there was not a lot of moisture, but also because of the unseasonably cold temperatures until recently. Click here to continue reading

Efficient processes necessary to effectively remove emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment plants

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

Water Canada

Currently, treatment systems let, on average, half of the emerging contaminants found in wastewater go through. However, scientists are developing new technologies to make infrastructure more efficient and remove the remaining contaminants that would otherwise be discharged into waterways. One of the most promising technologies is ozonation. Ozone, a powerful oxidizing gas, breaks down pollutants through a chemical reaction. Click here to continue reading

Alberta hatcheries begin stocking ponds with more than a million trout

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

CTV News

Nearly 200 ponds and lakes around Alberta are currently being stocked with more than 1.3 million fish that began their lives indoor in tanks in the province’s hatcheries. It takes ten months for a fish to grow from an egg to a catchable size of 20 centimetres in length at either the Sam Livingston Fish Hatchery in Calgary or the hatchery in Cold Lake in northern Alberta. Fisheries technician Shawn Berube drove a truck loaded with tanks of rainbow trout to Mount Lorette Ponds. The annual pilgrimage made from the Sam Livingston Fish Hatchery to Kananaskis country occurs once the surface ice melts and water becomes oxygenated. Click here to continue reading

Abraham Lake near Nordegg is very low, but vehicles are not permitted on the lakebed

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Visitors to the Nordegg area will notice a whole lot of ‘shoreline’ around the man-made Abraham Lake. The water level is very low this spring, as noticed this week by Aurum Lodge owner Alan Ernst. Since visitors are expected to flock to the area on the May long weekend, Ernst wants to remind area residents that driving vehicles onto the lake bed is not permitted. Cars and trucks used to get stuck in the mud near the lake every year. Click here to continue reading

Community gathers to help keep the river valley clean

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

CTV News

The River Valley Alliance (RVA) held its spring trail cleanup Saturday to help get garbage off the trails. Around 20 volunteers were equipped with cleanup kits from the RVA and hit the trails for a few hours in Edmonton. The volunteers came across a lot of masks, recyclables and wrappers. The RVA is a non-profit run by six municipalities that border the North Saskatchewan River in the capital region. Their goal is to preserve and enhance the river valley so everyone can enjoy it for years to come. Click here to continue reading

Manitobans in Red River Valley still grappling with ‘devastating’ flooding over windy weekend

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

CBC News

Just two months ago, Chao Shen bought his dream house in the St. Adolphe, Man., area and set to work making it a home where he and his wife could raise a family. Now, it’s more of a nightmare, with his new home’s basement underwater. “I’m feeling sad, very sad, because I just bought this March 8 and I spent $40,000 on renovations, and now it’s all flooded,” he said. On Friday, Shen returned to his house in the community just south of Winnipeg, after being evacuated from the area due to overland flooding. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Record number of dams removed from Europe’s rivers in 2021

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

The Guardian

More than 1m barriers are estimated to exist on Europe’s rivers, with many built more than a century ago. At least 150,000 are old, obsolete barriers that serve no economic purpose. Dams, weirs and other river obstacles block fish migration routes, often leading to the loss of breeding areas and reduced numbers of species such as salmon, sturgeon, trout and eel, which affects the wider biodiversity of ecosystems, including species ranging from eagles to otters. Free-flowing rivers also transport sediments and nutrients. Click here to continue reading

Rejection of Arctic mine expansion bid offers hope for narwhal population

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

The Guardian

The expansion of an iron ore mine in the Arctic that would have increased shipping and led to the “complete extirpation of narwhal” from the region has been blocked. After four years of consultations and deliberations, the Nunavut Impact Review Board rejected a request from Baffinland Iron Mines Corp asking to significantly increase mining on the northern tip of Baffin Island in Nunavut, Canada. The area is home to one of the world’s richest iron ore deposits, and the densest narwhal population in the world. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba flood zones seen from the air

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Manitoba’s premier and transportation minister shared a helicopter with the Opposition leader for a tour of flooded regions south and north of the provincial capital on Sunday, where water levels appear to have crested or are on their way down. But they noted heavy rain on Friday in the west, combined with melting snow, has washed out roads in Duck Mountain Provincial Park and has affected bridges on Highway 10 north and south of the community of Mafeking. Click here to continue reading

Residents who fled flooded N.W.T town can return; some services might be unavailable

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

Sylvan Lake News

A town in the Northwest Territories says people were being allowed to return to their homes Sunday evening, four days after about 3,500 were ordered to evacuate as floodwaters rose. A reopening plan posted by the Town of Hay River, on the south shore of Great Slave Lake, warns residents that hazard assessments do not include private property. The plan says it is important that residents understand the specific services available on their properties as they decide when it is appropriate to return. Click here to continue reading

Saskatchewan gets support for irrigation expansion

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

Water Canada

The Ministry of Agriculture is providing additional support for irrigation development in the province with a $2.5 million investment to help producers finance irrigation infrastructure. The $2.5 million included in the 2022-23 Budget will allow producers to continue to access up to $500,000 under the Irrigation Development Program, from the previous maximum payment of $300,000. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The European drought event from 2018 to 2020 was the most intense in over 250 years

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

Science Daily

The drought from 2018 to 2020 thus affected approximately one-third of the land area of Europe, especially in central Europe, such as Germany, France, and the Czech Republic. The total duration of the drought event in Europe was also unusually long, starting in April 2018 and not ending until December 2020: 33 months. Only the drought between 1857 and 1860 lasted slightly longer for a total of 35 months. What’s more: The drought from 2018 to 2020 also continued in 2021 and 2022 in deeper soils. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: California is in a water crisis, yet usage is way up. Officials are focused on the wrong problem, advocates say

PUBLISHED: 17 May 2022

CNN

California is facing a crisis. Not only are its reservoirs already at critically low levels due to unrelenting drought, residents and businesses across the state are also using more water now than they have in seven years, despite Gov. Gavin Newsom’s efforts to encourage just the opposite. Newsom has pleaded with residents and businesses to reduce their water consumption by 15%. But in March, urban water usage was up by 19% compared to March 2020, the year the current drought began. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Giant endangered freshwater stingray rescued by scientists

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

CBC News

A team of marine biologists has welcomed the discovery of an endangered giant freshwater stingray during a recent expedition to a remote stretch of the Mekong River in Cambodia, though they warned the biodiversity of the area was under threat. The stingray was accidentally caught by fishermen in an 80-metre-deep pool in the Mekong in Cambodia’s northeastern Stung Treng province, and the visiting scientists helped return the animal alive. Click here to continue reading

Post-flood workbook aims to help B.C. farmers

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

The Western Producer

Farmers hit by last year’s flooding in British Columbia need to plan their recovery, says the author of a provincial workbook on how to deal with the crisis. The 87-page workbook breaks the recovery process into several steps, beginning with assessing the situation, including dealing with grief. Click here to continue reading

 

Snowpack may be high west of Calgary, but flooding depends on rainfall

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

CTV News

Snowpack in the mountains west of Calgary is above average this year, but that doesn’t mean the risk of flooding is also higher than normal. The real risk of flooding, officials say, depends on how much rain falls in the area over the next two months. To prepare for spring runoff, water levels in the Glenmore Reservoir and Ghost Reservoir have been lowered to create more room for potential flood water. Crews are also testing infrastructure like river outfalls and lift stations, while also stockpiling materials for temporary barriers. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba storms take devastating toll on livestock

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

The Western Producer

Manitoba’s lambs have been decimated, about 3,000 calves are dead, and honeybee colonies are being ravaged as Manitoba producers continued to struggle through a fourth spring storm that hit May 9. The first storm was a blizzard, which caused deaths to animals on pasture and outdoor situations from multiple causes. The second storm was a mix of snow and heavy rain. The third was mostly rain. The fourth is rain. Click here to continue reading

Stettler town council hears about watershed school programs

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

East Central Alberta Review

Town of Stettler council heard about a watershed organization’s efforts to work with school kids on environmental education. The report was made at the May 3 regular meeting of council. The alliance management oversees three areas of interest, watershed management, engagement and stewardship and noted that the organization enjoys the membership of a diverse group of stakeholders including governments, industry, the farm community and many more. Click here to continue reading

As flood battles continue in Western Canada, here’s a look at what’s happened so far

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

Global News

Spring flooding has forced communities in the western provinces of Canada to declare states of emergency and evacuate residents. Excessive rainfall at the beginning of May has caused severe flooding, particularly in Manitoba and Alberta, where thousands have been forced out of their homes. Global News’ chief meteorologist Anthony Farnell said flooding often happens in Canada, but global warming is “making it a bit more extreme.” Click here to continue reading

What is Lethbridge’s risk of flooding in 2022?

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

Global News

It’s been several years since any major flooding occurred on the Oldman River in Lethbridge. However, snowmelt from the mountains and the arrival of some spring precipitation is raising the question: Is there any risk this year? According to Luke Palmer, the emergency preparedness manger with the City of Lethbridge, his team has begun transitioning to daily monitoring of river levels. Alberta Environment and Parks conducts different types of measuring for snowpacks. Up-to-date numbers are available online, but they also send teams to measure in person. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: California Coastal Commission rejects plan for Poseidon desalination plant

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

Los Angeles Times

After hearing hours of heated debate, the California Coastal Commission voted against a controversial plan by the company Poseidon Water to build a huge desalination plant in Huntington Beach. Despite worsening drought and repeated calls from Gov. Gavin Newsom to tap the Pacific Ocean as a source of drinking water, commissioners voted unanimously against the plan Thursday night. The decision, which was recommended by the commission‘s staff, may end the company’s plans for the $1.4-billion plant. Click here to continue reading

Citizen science whale observers worry humpbacks being harassed

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A humpback known as Big Mama and her new calf were followed by an entourage of whale watching boats upwards of five hours a day while in Boundary Pass earlier this week, said Washington-Smyth, co-ordinator for the Southern Gulf Island Whale Sighting Network. The network — which has more than 50 volunteer observers on three different islands to track whales — noted as many as eight vessels at a time in the vicinity of the humpbacks. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: South Africa’s April floods made twice as likely by climate crisis, scientists say

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

The Guardian

The massive and deadly floods that struck South Africa in April were made twice as likely and more intense by global heating, scientists have calculated. The research demonstrates that the climate emergency is resulting in devastation. Catastrophic floods and landslides hit the South African provinces of KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape on 11 April following exceptionally heavy rainfall. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba is flooding and there’s more rain on the way

PUBLISHED: 14 May 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Severe flooding that has displaced thousands of people in southern Manitoba has reached levels that are quite literally out of this world. Satellite images of flooding in the Red River Valley were NASA Earth Observatory’s images of the day on Thursday. The two false-colour images, taken on Tuesday and Wednesday, show the flooded valley on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border. The image from Tuesday shows dark masses of flooded area around the Red River from Winnipeg south to Grand Forks, N.D. Click here to continue reading

Emergency alerts remain: Floodwater on northern Alberta Métis settlement receding

PUBLISHED: 12 May 2022

CTV News

The chief administrative officer of a Métis settlement in northwestern Alberta says its members are feeling scared as floodwater that was up to the knees a few days ago recedes, exposing the damage left behind. The Dene Tha’ First Nation at Chateh, about 845 kilometres northwest of Edmonton, and the Little Red River Cree have also been under local emergency alerts due to flooding since the weekend. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Lampposts, rings, cameras: over 25,000 pounds of junk cleared from Lake Tahoe

PUBLISHED: 12 May 2022

The Guardian

A California non-profit started an ambitious project beneath the surface of Lake Tahoe that concluded Tuesday: hire scuba divers to gather the litter in the top 25 ft of the lake. Divers have now pulled out more than 25,000 pounds of debris from the 72 miles of the lake’s shoreline, working in a circle from Stateline, Nevada. As volunteer divers navigated the lake, they plucked plastic bottles, engagement rings, 1980s Nikon film cameras, entire lampposts, “no littering” signs, big pieces of broken-down boats and engine blocks, lost wallets and cordless home telephones, according to Clean Up the Lake. Click here to continue reading

UBC research pinpoints ‘blue corridors’ for highly migratory fish

PUBLISHED: 12 May 2022

Water Canada

By studying the tendency of fish to return to their place of birth to reproduce (a concept known as philopatry that is often, and falsely, thought to apply only to salmon species) and pairing such knowledge with catch distribution maps and tagging and genetic sequencing studies, researchers at UBC’s Sea Around Us initiative identified the tentative migration routes of 11 tuna and other large pelagic fish in the Pacific Ocean and determined that certain areas should be considered as of ‘high’ and ‘very high’ priority when it comes to maintaining their populations. Click here to continue reading

Evacuation order issued for all of Hay River, N.W.T.

PUBLISHED: 12 May 2022

CBC News

An evacuation order was issued for the entire community of Hay River, N.W.T., at 11:45 p.m. MT Tuesday, with residents asked to head to higher ground or the community centre. Those in need of transportation assistance are asked to call 833-699-0188. People who leave the community are asked to register at the same number or on the town’s website. Those who head to Yellowknife are asked to go directly to the Multiplex at 41 Kam Lake Road. Click here to continue reading

Hay River reports extensive flood damage as second surge of water and ice hits community

PUBLISHED: 12 May 2022

CBC News

Ice and floodwaters have caused “extensive” damage in Hay River, N.W.T., according to senior administrative officer Glenn Smith. A second surge of water and ice began to push through the community Thursday morning at around 8 a.m. The town is warning residents who are still in Hay River to find high ground or take shelter at the community centre. There may be more surges coming. An evacuation order, issued late Wednesday night, remains in place for the entire community. Click here to continue reading

‘It’s not supposed to be here’: Wayward minke whale spotted near Montreal sparks worries

PUBLISHED: 12 May 2022

CTV News

A marine mammal research group is keeping a close eye on a wayward minke whale that made its way to the Montreal area over the weekend, raising concerns about its safety. The whale was first spotted on Sunday afternoon between Île Sainte-Hélène and Île Notre-Dame. Alain Belso was at Parc Jean-Drapeau for a walk when he noticed a fin sticking out of the water. The nature photographer had his camera with him, naturally, so he snapped a few photos, first thinking it might be a dolphin. Click here to continue reading

Floods in northern Alberta force thousands of people to flee their homes

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Edmonton Journal

More than 1,000 people have been forced from their homes in the Dene Tha’ First Nation community of Chateh after flooding that Chief James Ahnassay calls the worst he’s seen in his lifetime. An evacuation order for Chateh, about 100 kilometres west of High Level, was issued Sunday as snowmelt and precipitation drove overland flooding. Ahnassay said Tuesday that water levels still haven’t begun to recede. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Ukraine’s ‘hero river’ helped save Kyiv. But what now for its newly restored wetlands?

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

The Guardian

After negotiating more than a dozen army checkpoints within the thick forests of Kyiv’s outer boundary, we have reached the flooded village of Demydiv on the Irpin River and the long-lost wetland basin, which has returned after the dam was opened by Ukrainian troops defending the capital from Russian army units, and was later struck by a missile. The breaching of the Irpin dam at the end of February held back the Russian soldiers and tanks, and reflooded 13,000 hectares (32,000 acres) of wetlands that were drained by the Soviets in the 1960s. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: California to decide fate of controversial desalination plant amid brutal drought

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

The Guardian

California officials are poised to decide the fate of a controversial desalination plant planned along its southern coast, in a vote that comes as the American west battles an increasingly perilous drought. California water use leapt 19% in March, amid one of the driest months on record. After more than a decade of debate, the California coastal commission on Thursday will finally vote on a proposal for a $1.4bn desalination plant in Huntington Beach, south of Los Angeles. Click here to continue reading

New DNA insights can help transform Arctic marine biodiversity and fisheries management

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Water Canada

There are significant knowledge gaps relating to Canada’s biodiversity in the north, including Inuit Nunangat. Traditional environmental programs have been limited due to remote, harsh arctic conditions. The Nunavut Fisheries Association (NFA) and environmental genomics specialists, eDNAtec, have partnered, through a MOU to bridge this knowledge gap, expanding upon their Canada’s Ocean Supercluster project, OceanDNA System™. Click here to continue reading

Disaster financial assistance program for Manitoba flooding

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Water Canada

The Manitoba government is providing Disaster Financial Assistance (DFA) to individuals and municipalities experiencing damages to infrastructure, private residences, farms or small businesses due to spring flooding, Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Doyle Piwniuk announced. Click here to continue reading

Inuit fear Arctic mine expansion could hasten narwhal decline

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Inuit hunters fear an upcoming ruling on an Arctic mine expansion could hasten the ongoing decline of a narwhal population that they rely on for food. Harvesters say numbers of the iconic, single-tusked whale are already a small fraction of what they were before the Mary River iron mine began operating. They say a decision expected Friday from the Nunavut Impact Review Board could make things even worse by allowing the mine to nearly double the amount of ship traffic through nearby waters. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: California water use leaps 19% in March, amid one of the driest months on record

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

The Guardian

California’s drought is worsening yet new figures show that in March, water usage jumped nearly 19% compared with 2020, during one of the driest months on record. The startling figures come despite pleas from the state’s governor, Gavin Newsom, and other authorities who have urged residents to curb their water usages. They also come the same day that the Los Angeles mayor ordered residents and businesses to restrict outdoor watering to just two days a week in an effort to conserve. Click here to continue reading

Hay River, N.W.T., issues evacuation alert for riverfront properties

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

CBC News

The Town of Hay River, N.W.T., has issued an evacuation alert for riverfront properties, including the Corridor, Miron Drive, McBryan Drive, Capital Drive (Downtown) and Riverview Drive. The alert is precautionary, the town said in a notice at 8 p.m. Sunday night, due to the risk of flooding from the river. It will be followed up with an evacuation order if needed. The alert came a couple hours after the town ordered the evacuation of Paradise Gardens, a satellite community about 25 kilometres south of Hay River. Click here to continue reading

Crews in Peguis First Nation ramp up flood protection in anticipation of more rain

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

CBC News

With more rain expected this week, the flood fight in Peguis First Nation is taking on renewed urgency today, with crews working rapidly to build up dikes and sandbagging around homes. Water levels in the community have gone down in recent days, enough so that a tractor trailer was able to make a delivery to the local grocery store. But rain in the forecast has residents worried water levels will rise back up again. The province’s flood forecaster met with community leaders Sunday, telling them that with the added precipitation, the area could see water levels rise back up again by 30 centimetres or more. Click here to continue reading

Water Diversion Leaves Fish Stranded In Canal

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Chestermere Anchor

Alberta Environment and Parks have received reports of fish stranded in the inlet canal to Chestermere Lake. On April 25, local residents reported the fish near the pedestrian bridge. “Water diversion had been started in Calgary, but the diverted water had not yet reached Chestermere Lake. The pre-diversion water flow in the canal is likely the result of snowfall events on April 19 and April 22 and subsequent snowmelt.” Click here to continue reading

Last habitat of endangered Atlantic whitefish saved from logging

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Canada’s National Observer

After strong pushback, Nova Scotia has halted logging plans in an area that is home to the world’s only remaining population of Atlantic whitefish. The province’s Department of Natural Resources and Renewables announced the decision Monday, citing the species’ precarious state as the reason for an indefinite hold on logging plans near Minamkeak Lake that include three sections of Crown land. The move comes after WestFor, a forestry group that supplies lumber to 13 mills in the province, proposed a 49-hectare cutblock in the Petite Rivière watershed in southwestern Nova Scotia. Click here to continue reading

B.C. benefits from flood mitigation funding

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Water Canada

To help reduce flood risk, the Province is providing Merritt with $329,000 for a project to update flood-hazard mapping and develop new flood-mitigation plans, and the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen (RDOS) and the community of Princeton with $100,000 each to create an updated flood risk and hazard assessment. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Devastating’: 90% of reefs surveyed on Great Barrier Reef affected by coral bleaching in 2022

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

The Guardian

Coral bleaching affected more than 90% of reefs surveyed along the Great Barrier Reef this year, according to a report by government scientists that confirms the natural landmark has suffered its sixth mass bleaching event on record. The Reef snapshot: summer 2021-22, quietly published by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority on Tuesday night after weeks of delay, said above-average water temperatures in late summer had caused coral bleaching throughout the 2,300km reef system. Click here to continue reading

3rd northern Alberta community under local state of emergency due to flooding

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Global News

Flooding has led a third northern Alberta community to issue a local state of emergency. The Paddle Prairie Métis Nation Settlement joins Chateh and Little Red River Cree in issuing local states of emergency due to localized flooding. As of Tuesday morning, the Alberta government said about 20 to 30 homes on the Paddle Prairie Métis Nation Settlement had been evacuated. A flood warning was issued for the Sousa Creek last Friday, with waters expecting to rise over the next four to five days. Click here to continue reading

Canada’s Largest Water Infrastructure Projects

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

Water Canada

Each year, our sister publication ReNew Canada provides its report on the largest public sector infrastructure projects in Canada. This year’s report reached new heights: $273 billion in assets in the transit, transportation, energy, healthcare, and water industries, along with other public sector projects making the list. The water sector continues to have a strong presence, with nine of Canada’s Top100 Projects coming specifically from the water sector, including wastewater treatment plants, reservoirs, and flood mitigation assets in four Canadian provinces (B.C., Alberta, Manitoba, and Ontario). Click here to continue reading

Flood forecasters watching closely as Manitoba expected to get more rain over coming days

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

CBC News

Flood forecasters in Manitoba say they’re keeping a close eye on a series of precipitation systems that could bring between 40 and 60 millimetres of rain to much of the province over the next five to seven days. There’s also a high chance some areas will get more than 60 millimetres of rain, the province said in a flood bulletin on Saturday afternoon. Manitoba’s hydrologic forecast centre will update its water level forecasts to determine the effect all the rain will have on areas already experiencing flooding, the bulletin said. Click here to continue reading

Huon Aquaculture accounts for 75% of seal deaths at Tasmanian salmon farms in past year

PUBLISHED: 11 May 2022

The Guardian

Huon Aquaculture accounted for the deaths of at least three-quarters of seals killed at Tasmanian salmon farms since the start of last year, with new data showing the company released more than 8,000 underwater explosives aimed at scaring the seals. Government data released in response to a right-to-information request revealed Huon Aquaculture, now owned by the controversial Brazilian meat company JBS, used 8,057 underwater explosives against seals in the 15 months to the end of March. Click here to continue reading

Century-old treaty stops Alberta farmers from using Milk River for much of the summer

PUBLISHED: 10 May 2022

CBC News

The Milk River looks great right now, according to farmer Elise Walker. It’s high, it’s flowing and it’s fairly clean. For now, she and about 30 to 40 other families in southern Alberta can continue using the water to irrigate their farms, helping to get them through a very dry spring. In fact, Walker already started to irrigate her 607 hectares (1,500 acres) of land at the end of March — the earliest ever. But she and other farmers are steeling themselves for that moment in the near future when they’ll have to watch the water flow by. Click here to continue reading

Policy must accelerate to keep pace with emerging water concerns

PUBLISHED: 10 May 2022

Water Canada

Researchers from Toronto Metropolitan University are leading critical policy conversations as emerging issues and technologies impact how we consume and use water. While water research is primarily led by scientists and engineers, politics and public administration professor Carolyn Johns, urban and regional planning professor Pamela Robinson and law and business professor Patricia Hania are examining areas where policy and legislation around water are slow to adapt to current urban realities. Click here to continue reading

This First Nation was swindled out of its land — and into a flood zone

PUBLISHED: 10 May 2022

CBC News

The largest First Nation community in Manitoba is no stranger to flooding — over the last few decades, residents have been chased from their homes by rising waters several times — but that wasn’t always the case. A few generations ago, the community lived on prime farmland just north of Winnipeg, far from the flood-prone delta on the Fisher River about 160 km north of the capital city where it is today. Click here to continue reading

Committee in Ottawa seeks to eliminate risk to rural communal drinking water

PUBLISHED: 10 May 2022

Water Canada

The City’s Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee has approved an incentive program to encourage the replacement of fuel oil tanks near municipal wells. Home heating oil fuel tanks in areas near municipal wells can pose a threat to rural communal drinking water. While existing policies do require annual inspections and maintenance to prevent spills, removing these tanks would eliminate the risk altogether. Click here to continue reading

Advanced sedimentation technologies proven effective at improving water quality

PUBLISHED: 10 May 2022

Water Canada

A three-year pilot project completed by Greenland International Consulting Ltd. studying the effectiveness of Clearflow Group’s Advanced Sedimentation Technologies (ASTs) has been completed at an active development site in Innisfil, Ontario. Since 2015, Greenland and Clearflow have worked collaboratively on innovative water management solutions using Clearflow’s product line with Greenland’s 30-year engineering track record in stormwater management. This includes site solutions to address regulatory compliance targets and regard for cumulative river basin conditions for a broader environmental risk mitigation perspective. Click here to continue reading

Climate change means more rain will fall but its impact on severe storms is less clear

PUBLISHED: 09 May 2022

CBC News

Severe thunderstorms and summer go hand-in-hand on the Prairies. And it’s not your imagination that such weather events have been getting increasingly catastrophic over the past decade. In the prairies, the last few years have been marked by severe storms. Calgary alone has seen hail, funnel clouds, and lightning strikes, with downpours that turned roads into rivers and stranded motorists in their cars. Climate change is increasing the risk of these extreme weather events. Click here to continue reading

Nixon lays out public input on feedlot near popular Alberta lake

PUBLISHED: 06 May 2022

Global News

Alberta’s environment minister says there has been public input on a plan to build a cattle feedlot near a popular recreational lake southwest of Edmonton. Earlier this week, an Opposition politician said the proposal for a 4,000-head feedlot near Pigeon Lake did not give thousands of people in the area enough time to understand the potential consequences and express concerns. Click here to continue reading

Construction begins on Springbank reservoir intended to protect Calgary area from floods

PUBLISHED: 06 May 2022

CBC News

The long-awaited and sometimes controversial Springbank off-stream reservoir project (SR1) is now underway, the provincial government announced Thursday, with the construction contract awarded to Vinci Infrastructure Canada. The project is intended to protect Calgary from floods such as the one that hit the region in 2013, causing widespread devastation. That event resulted in an estimated $5 billion in damage, killed five people and forced tens of thousands to evacuate. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: U.S. takes unprecedented steps to replenish Colorado River’s Lake Powell

PUBLISHED: 04 May 2022

Reuters

U.S. officials on Tuesday announced unprecedented measures to boost water levels at Lake Powell, an artificial reservoir on the Colorado River that is so low as to endanger the production of hydroelectric power for seven Western states. Amid a sustained drought exacerbated by climate change, the Bureau of Reclamation will release an additional 500,000 acre-feet (616.7 million cubic meters) of water this year from the Flaming Gorge Reservoir upstream on the Wyoming-Utah border that will flow into Lake Powell. Click here to continue reading

Neskantaga First Nation’s chief says residents don’t support federal drinking water settlement

PUBLISHED: 03 May 2022

CBC News

Residents of some First Nations affected by unsafe drinking water can now file claims under a settlement with the federal government, but the chief of one northwestern Ontario community says they don’t support the arrangement. “I just want to say that I’m not in agreement with the settlement,” said Roy Moonias, a member of Neskantaga First Nation, which has been under a drinking-water advisory for nearly three decades. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flood and cyclone-prone areas in eastern Australia may be ‘uninsurable’ by 2030, report suggests

PUBLISHED: 03 May 2022

The Guardian

Extreme weather due to the climate crisis is expected to increasingly make some Australian homes “uninsurable”, with a new report suggesting up to one in 25 households will struggle to be covered by 2030. The analysis by the Climate Council, using data from consultants Climate Valuation, mapped the 10 electorates across the country considered most at risk of becoming uninsurable due to flood, fire and other extreme weather risk. Click here to continue reading

Northeast Sask. lake rich in history and unusual scenery

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

The Western Producer

Amisk Lake in northeastern Saskatchewan stands out for its varied landscapes and storied history, much of which we can experience on a drive along its eastern shore. Highway 167 starts at the twin communities of Creighton and Flin Flon on the Saskatchewan-Manitoba border and then winds southwest to the resort village of Denare Beach. A protected bay with myriad islands gives the community a stunning setting. It boasts a sandy beach, picnic grounds, campground, fishing lodges, cottages and shops. Click here to continue reading

Caution urged for South Sask. River system

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

The Western Producer

Projects ranging from logging to open-pit coal mining in the Alberta headwaters of the South Saskatchewan River system need to be scrutinized before being approved, says a researcher. Any development “really needs to be done in a careful way that minimizes the disruption of these really pristine and sensitive headwater ecosystems,” said Matthew Bogard, who is the Canada Research Chair in Aquatic Environments at the University of Lethbridge. Click here to continue reading

Proposed cattle feedlot threatens popular but fragile Pigeon Lake, residents say

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

CBC News

Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting anxiously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large cattle feedlot to be developed near a popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. Pigeon Lake, about 100 kilometres southwest of Edmonton, is home to about 5,800 seasonal and permanent residents and attracts about 100,000 visitors a year to its leafy setting, beaches, boating and fishing. But many say that’s threatened by a proposal before the Natural Resources Conservation Board. Click here to continue reading

Hundreds in Peguis First Nation flee homes as Fisher River floods community

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

CBC News

Flooding has forced hundreds of people living in Peguis First Nation to leave their homes after local officials issued a mandatory evacuation order on Sunday. A total of 920 people are now in hotels in Winnipeg. Chief Glenn Hudson said he has never seen flooding this bad. The Interlake community, 160 kilometres north of Winnipeg, is the most populous First Nation in the province with around 11,000 members, 4,800 of whom live in the community. Click here to continue reading

Husky Oil fined for contaminated water release into Saskatchewan river

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Husky Oil has been fined $600,000 for releasing a harmful substance into a river in Saskatchewan. The Calgary-based oil and gas producer pleaded guilty Friday in provincial court to depositing the substance into a waterway full of fish. The charge came after the release almost four years ago of about 2.8 million litres of process water, a byproduct of oil and gas production and typically high in salt content. Click here to continue reading

Town of Sylvan Lake begins annual water conservation program

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

Sylvan Lake News

As part of the Town of Sylvan Lake’s many attempts to reduce the environmental footprint, a mandatory water conservation program is in effect from May 1 to Sept. 30. The conservation program is enforced during the same time every year. “Let’s all do our part and use water wisely. Rain barrels are a great way to collect rainwater for outdoor use,” states the town website. The program strictly prohibits watering lawns, gardens and yards between noon and 7 p.m. on any day of the month. Click here to continue reading

Feds announce 2022 measures to protect endangered orcas

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

CTV News

For the fourth year in a row, Transport Canada has announced measures to protect southern resident killer whales in British Columbia. Announced Friday, they include additional closures of commercial and recreational salmon fisheries, “seasonal slowdown areas,” and limits on whale watching tours. “These actions will help protect the whales’ access to salmon and minimize disturbance in key foraging areas,” says a statement from the federal agency. Click here to continue reading

Sundre receives $7.5-million grant for wastewater treatment plant

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

Red Deer Advocate

The Town of Sundre will receive a one-time grant from the province for upgrades to its wastewater treatment plant, after a pilot project to test new technology has been evaluated. The pilot project, which ends in 2023, is part of plans to upgrade the wastewater treatment plant with new and innovative technology. Construction will create 69 jobs. The Government of Alberta says the $7.5-million contribution will support innovation, be more cost-effective and provide environmental benefits. Click here to continue reading

After weeks of moisture, drought conditions ease in parts of Prairies

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

CBC News

Trevor Hadwen, an agriclimate specialist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, says the drought has migrated over Western Canada over the past five years or so, with Manitoba and Saskatchewan experiencing the worst of it last summer. This year, he says, the contrast in Saskatchewan is noticeable. Click here to continue reading

Drought-stricken farmers pray for rain as they seed their crops

PUBLISHED: 02 May 2022

Calgary Herald

Farmers in southeastern Alberta are desperate for rain as they seed their fields. They were largely skipped by the snow and moisture Calgary received this past week and are already considered to be in drought conditions. This is coming off of last year’s drought and heat dome which doomed many crops across the Prairies. They are eternal optimists, but already are a little wary of what could be in store for them. Click here to continue reading

Red River flood now expected to be as high as crest in 2009, the worst since 1997

PUBLISHED: 29 April 2022

CBC News

The spring flood on the Red River is now expected to approach the volume of the 2009 flood, which was the highest since the 1997 flood of the century, provincial forecasters say. Provincial hydrologist Fisaha Unduche forecasts the Red River will crest around May 10 at a level slightly below that of the 2009 flood, which closed down Highway 75 for weeks and required the evacuation of some rural properties. Click here to continue reading

Alberta’s mountain snowpack above average this season

PUBLISHED: 29 April 2022

CTV News

To track the amount of snow that falls in Alberta’s mountain parks, the province monitors real-time electronic data along with physically measuring the depth and weight to calculate its water equivalence. So far this season, numbers show there is a lot of snow in the mountains. At various points in mountain parks the snowpack averages between 115 and 145 percent of normal. Click here to continue reading

Residents in Three Hills, Alta. told to boil water until further notice

PUBLISHED: 29 April 2022

CTV News

Some residents in Three Hills, Alta. are being instructed to take precautions with their water supply after a water main break knocked out services on Tuesday. The town says the issue in the community of approximately 3,000 people was first discovered at about 3 p.m. on April 26. Officials said crews were immediately dispatched to repair the break that affected a number of homes and businesses. Click here to continue reading

Taber, Alta. breaks ground on constructed wetlands to aid with flood mitigation

PUBLISHED: 29 April 2022

Global News

A new constructed wetlands project in the eastern part of Taber, Alta., is hoping to prevent future flood damage and assist the local irrigation district. In March of 2018, a state of emergency was declared in the Municipal District of Taber and the Town of Taber due to overland flooding caused by rapid snow melt. Several homes were evacuated and the damage was costly. Click here to continue reading

Details on water blockage for Lethbridge farmers revealed, 2 weeks later

PUBLISHED: 29 April 2022

Global News

The details of a now resolved dispute between the Piikani Nation and Alberta government are coming to light, two weeks after water stopped flowing into the Lethbridge Northern Irrigation District (LNID). The blockage sent farmers across southern Alberta into a panic as they tried to grapple with the ramifications of what that could mean for their livestock and crops. But possibly the most frustrating part for these farmers was the fact that they had no idea what the issue was, or why it was happening. Click here to continue reading

Irrigation dispute resolved for southern Alberta farmers

PUBLISHED: 27 April 2022

Global News

Water issues continued to plague southern Alberta farmers into Tuesday as few details were available as to why or what was happening, but officials later said a resolution had been reached. Those who rely on the Lethbridge Northern Irrigation District (LNID) to water their crops and animals were worried this blockage, and standoff between the government and the Piikani Nation, could cause detrimental results. Click here to continue reading

Massive underwater avalanches deliver pollutants to deep sea

PUBLISHED: 27 April 2022

The Guardian

On 18 November 1929, a magnitude 7.2 earthquake shook the ocean floor off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada. Within minutes transatlantic telephone cables started sequentially snapping, with the furthest cable – 600km from the quake – breaking 13 hours and 17 minutes later. At the time geologists hypothesized that the cables had been broken by a series of earthquakes, but we now know that the culprit was a massive underwater avalanche, known as a “turbidity current”. Click here to continue reading

New federal funding will shore up Ducks Unlimited Canada’s conservation efforts in the Fraser River Estuary

PUBLISHED: 27 April 2022

Ducks Unlimited Canada

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada announced more than $5 million in funding for three major conservation projects in the Fraser River Estuary to restore salmon habitat. The projects will receive funding through the British Columbia Salmon Restoration and Innovation Fund, a contribution program funded jointly by the federal and provincial government to support B.C.’s fish and seafood sector, and to ensure the sustainability of wild Pacific salmon. Click here to continue reading

District of Squamish Wastewater Treatment Plant to receive $10M upgrade for growing community

PUBLISHED: 27 April 2022

District of Squamish

Construction upgrades to the primary and secondary-treatment processing system at the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) are set to begin later this month to help meet the demands of a growing community as well as maintain compliance with Federal and Provincial wastewater treatment regulations. Click here to continue reading

High snowpack, water levels put several N.W.T. communities once again at risk of spring flooding

PUBLISHED: 26 April 2022

CBC News

Water levels in the Hay River Basin are at or near the highest ever recorded at this time of year — as much as 40 per cent higher than normal levels in Alberta and B.C. This is combined with an already saturated ground which increases the risk of smaller bodies of water overflowing. Higher than normal water levels have been recorded around Aklavik and high snowpack is reported around the Peel River and the Mackenzie Delta. Click here to continue reading

‘It’s life or death’: Southern Alberta farmers in dark over potential water stoppage

PUBLISHED: 26 April 2022

Global News

A lack of water: it’s an issue farmers often deal with during dry periods throughout the year, however, now people are worried there could be a shortage for a very different reason. On Saturday, dozens of farmers and stakeholders with the Lethbridge Northern Irrigation District met in Nobleford to discuss a blockage of water. Click here to continue reading

Banff National Park opens registration for guided hike to Hidden Lake

PUBLISHED: 25 April 2022

CTV News

Registration is now open for visitors to Banff National Park to explore Hidden Lake, a glacier-fed lake in the park’s Skoki Valley. Participants on the hike will also be able to learn more about the conservation work in Banff National Park, specifically the effort to restore westslope cutthroat trout populations and other species at risk. Click here to continue reading

EPCOR employs army of home water sniffers to monitor Edmonton’s water quality

PUBLISHED: 25 April 2022

CTV News

Susan Godwin has an unusual side gig. She’s been a water sniffer for EPCOR for the last seven years. EPCOR says the program, which runs from Family Day to the end of May, goes back more than two decades. The sniffers test the hot and cold water in their homes every day. Godwin says she does it first thing in the morning, and she fills out a survey that goes back to EPCOR. The company compensates her in gift cards for the yearly task. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Could Anglesey’s tidal energy project drive a new energy revolution?

PUBLISHED: 25 April 2022

The Guardian

On the stunning and craggy coastline of Holy Island in north Wales, work has started on a construction project to generate energy from one of the world’s greatest untapped energy resources: tidal power. The Morlais project, on the small island off the west of Anglesey, has benefited from £31m in what is likely to be the last large grant for Wales from the European Union’s regional funding program. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: After the relentless rain, South Africa sounds the alarm on the climate crisis

PUBLISHED: 25 April 2022

The Guardian

Survivors of South Africa’s devastating floods have described “sheet upon sheet of relentless rain” that washed away entire houses, bridges and roads, killing about 450 people and making thousands homeless. The storm, which delivered close to an entire year’s usual rainfall in 48 hours, took meteorologists by surprise and has been blamed by experts on climate change. The new disaster comes after three tropical cyclones and two tropical storms hit south-east Africa in just six weeks in the first months of this year. Click here to continue reading

Winnipeg homeowners grapple with damaged homes, ruined basements amid flooding from spring storm

PUBLISHED: 25 April 2022

CBC News

A spring storm, which brought up to 60 millimetres of rain and snow, has flooded and damaged the homes of many Winnipeggers — leaving some wondering what they should do next. The city said in a news release that Winnipeg crews are working hard around the clock to clear ditches, catch basins and culverts so water can drain more effectively. Click here to continue reading

Wet spring seen as likely for Prairies

PUBLISHED: 22 April 2022

The Western Producer

What this summer’s weather holds for producers was a hot topic during the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association’s first townhall of 2022 with meteorologist Matt Makens outlining the latest predictions. Makens said sea surface temperatures remain colder than average, especially in the Gulf of Alaska, that will see storm systems draining them of their humidity as they move from the West over Canada and the northern United States. Click here to continue reading

Meeting a critical need: First Nations community gets water treatment facility

PUBLISHED: 22 April 2022

Water Canada

Most of North America takes potable water for granted, but for many of Canada’s First Nation communities, access to clean drinking water is not a given. While many Indigenous communities continue to wait for water service, residents of the Fort McMurray #468 First Nation recently witnessed the construction of a water reservoir and pump station that will deliver clean, reliable, potable water to its nearly 600 residents. Click here to continue reading

Canada and Prince Edward Island invest in improved water and wastewater infrastructure for Cornwall

PUBLISHED: 22 April 2022

Government of Canada

Joint funding for two community infrastructure projects that will improve water and wastewater infrastructure in the Town of Cornwall was recently announced. Funding will support the installation of 2,100 metres of new watermains, 18 new fire hydrants and new property services along Main Street. Several hundred metres of the new watermains will be used to expand the water distribution system and provide new services to 13 existing properties over a hundred acres of land within Cornwall. Click here to continue reading

Watershed restoration creates a healthier future for B.C.

PUBLISHED: 22 April 2022

Government of British Columbia

An ongoing effort to restore watersheds and wetlands in the province is creating a healthier future for British Columbians by mitigating the impacts of climate change on communities, strengthening ecosystems and securing quality drinking water. Premier John Horgan highlighted the Budget 2022 commitment of $30 million to continue to improve B.C.’s watersheds. Half of the funding ($15 million) will be provided to Watersheds BC through the MakeWay Foundation to co-ordinate watershed restoration projects led or co-led by First Nations. Click here to continue reading

Tech helps researchers track endangered right whales off Atlantic coast

PUBLISHED: 22 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Researchers will be using the latest technology again this year to track the movement of North Atlantic right whales in the waters off Atlantic Canada in an effort to protect the endangered animals. It’s the second year of a five-year, $3.6-million project using ocean-going autonomous vehicles called underwater gliders. The two gliders used last year successfully provided information in time to reduce whale collisions with vessels. Click here to continue reading

Protected areas don’t always benefit wildlife, global study finds

PUBLISHED: 21 April 2022

The Guardian

National parks and other protected areas have had mixed success in conserving wildlife, according to the largest ever global study of their effects. Using wetland bird data from 1,506 protected areas around the world, scientists analyzed the trends of more than 27,000 populations, and found that increased provision for the birds had not necessarily helped. The results show that managing parks to protect species and their habitats is crucial, and that without such management parks are more likely to be ineffective. Click here to continue reading

Red Deer gets a month’s worth of snow in one big April dump

PUBLISHED: 21 April 2022

Red Deer Advocate

As if to make up for a dry winter, Mother Nature delivered a month’s worth of spring snow on Red Deer in one big dump. From 10 to 15 cm of snow fell on the city from Tuesday afternoon to Wednesday morning, while our average snowfall for the month is about 14 cm, said Sara Hoffman, a meteorologist for Environment and Climate Change Canada. As a result, many Red Deerians had to haul their shovels, snowblowers and windshield-scrapers out of storage. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Trojan trout: could turning an invasive fish into a ‘super-male’ save a native species?

PUBLISHED: 21 April 2022

The Guardian

There were just two species found in Leandro Creek. One is an embattled native, the Rio Grande cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki virginalis), distinguished by its cream-coloured skin, mottling of black spots and a vibrant orange slash under the jaw. Once widely distributed in rivers and streams across northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, it is now found across just 10% of its historical range. Today, it is reeling under the pressures of the climate crisis, habitat loss and a hardy intruder. Click here to continue reading

Ducks Unlimited Canada analyzing wetlands on farms and ranches for carbon capture

PUBLISHED: 21 April 2022

Water Canada

New research in southwest Manitoba will help landowners, industry and government understand carbon storage and greenhouse gas release from wetlands in two important agricultural landscapes. Funded by the Canadian Agriculture Partnership, Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) and its project partner Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association (MFGA) are measuring carbon dioxide and methane emissions from wetlands located on cattle farms and wetlands found in annual crop fields. Click here to continue reading

Kingston’s clean water tech collaboration

PUBLISHED: 21 April 2022

Water Canada

St. Lawrence College (SLC) Applied Research and Queen’s University have partnered with Purafy Clean Technologies Inc., of Kingston, ON to assess the water and energy saving potential of Purafy’s water treatment system. This multi-dimensional research and development project will last three years, with funding support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and provincial government channels. Click here to continue reading

Canada and Ontario invest in 144 community water infrastructure projects

PUBLISHED: 20 April 2022

Water Canada

The Government of Canada is investing more than $190.2 million in 144 projects across Ontario, through the Green Infrastructure Stream of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program. The Government of Ontario is providing over $140.5 million, while local communities are contributing more than $108.5 million. Today’s investment will improve water infrastructure and ensure Canadians have better access to reliable and clean drinking water. Click here to continue reading

Phase 2 wastewater upgrade for Cranbrook, B.C.

PUBLISHED: 20 April 2022

Water Canada

The desludging and diffuser upgrades will be a huge step in significantly minimizing the odour issues that have been occurring for the past several years. It is important to know that significant odour issues will still be experienced this spring, and will likely occur during the project work itself as the desludging and sewage handling takes place. The City will provide updates to the public throughout this phase especially around the desludging portion of the project as the odour from the lagoons will be much more noticeable. Click here to continue reading

Flood-affected B.C. communities benefit from recovery funding

PUBLISHED: 20 April 2022

Water Canada

Ten B.C. communities severely affected by the November 2021 floods are receiving $53.6 million in provincial funding to support recovery work and get people back into their communities. Due to the extreme effects of the flooding on their communities, the local governments of Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Cowichan Valley Regional District, Fraser Valley Regional District, Hope, Kent, Merritt, Mission, Princeton and Thompson-Nicola Regional District are receiving direct grants to assist them in meeting the additional costs pressures of ongoing recovery and infrastructure planning. Click here to continue reading

Our oceans aren’t just warming — they sound different

PUBLISHED: 20 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Wander into nature and give a good shout and only nearby birds, frogs, and squirrels will hear you. Although sensing noise is a critical survival strategy for land animals, it’s a somewhat limited warning system, as sounds — save for something like a massive volcanic explosion — don’t travel far in the air. They propagate much better through water, with undersea noises travelling hundreds or even thousands of miles, depending on the conditions. Click here to continue reading

Conservation group’s fish carry scheme save thousands of salmon

PUBLISHED: 20 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society, a group of volunteers near Kulchyski’s home, 50 kilometres north of Victoria, have taken the fish into their own hands — literally. They have built a human-propelled salmon run, carrying thousands of spawning salmon from a fish trap in the Salish Sea, up a hillside, above several waterfalls and across the Trans-Canada Highway before releasing them into nearby Shawnigan Creek. Click here to continue reading

Calgary hit with record snowfall of 22 cm in 24 hours

PUBLISHED: 20 April 2022

Global News

More snow fell on Tuesday than what Calgary had for the entire month of March according to Tiffany Lizée, chief meteorologist for Global Calgary. In the past 24 hours, Calgary had 22 centimetres of snow, a record-breaker for April 19 in Calgary. Environment Canada website states the snowiest April 19 before 2022 was in 1985, when Calgary recorded 12.4 cm of snow. The government weather organization had issued snowfall warnings overnight which ended around 4:30 a.m. Wednesday. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Thames Water dumped raw sewage into rivers 5,028 times in 2021

PUBLISHED: 20 April 2022

The Guardian

Thames Water dumped untreated effluent for more than 68,000 hours into the river systems around Oxford last year, campaigners have revealed, arguing that the sum of money the company plans to spend to improve the situation is woefully inadequate. The company discharged raw sewage into the River Thames and its tributaries including the River Windrush, Thame, Evenlode and Ock 5,028 times in 2021, according to data analyzed by the Oxford Rivers Improvement Campaign (ORIC). Click here to continue reading

Magnificent B.C. cold-water coral garden in peril

PUBLISHED: 19 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A remarkable coral garden tucked away in a remote inlet on B.C.’s wild central coast is in danger unless the federal government takes immediate steps to save it from destruction before prawn fishing season gets underway, conservationists say. Heavy prawn traps and ropes, which make contact with the seabed, are particularly destructive to the delicate red tree corals, or Primnoa pacifica, in a unique area in the centre of Knight Inlet. Click here to continue reading

Floating flora for friendlier feedlot flush? Maybe

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

The Western Producer

Researchers want to know if floating islands filled with native plants and placed in feedlot runoff ponds will help remove unwanted contaminants. The project began in 2019 when researchers at Olds studied nutrient and contaminant uptake with a variety of plants including cattails, wheat sedge, sweet flag, smartweed, and water sedge. In a greenhouse, the plants were placed in troughs that were filled with water enriched with high concentrations of nutrients. All plants removed some nutrients, but the cattails performed best. Click here to continue reading

Water studied on the Eastern Slopes

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

The Western Producer

A four-year project will use technology created for video games to help people understand the increasing pressures on water resources in Alberta’s Rocky Mountains. It aims to better explain and monitor snowpack and downstream river runoff in the Eastern Slopes, said Christopher Hopkinson, research chair in remote sensing at the University of Lethbridge. Although the project won’t specifically look at the impact downstream on farmers and ranchers, the agricultural context is “crucially important to everything we’re doing,” he said. Click here to continue reading

$9.5 Million to Experimental Lakes Area research

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

Water Canada

The Ontario government is investing $9.5 million to support vital research in the Experimental Lakes Area—the only freshwater research facility of its kind in the world. The five-year agreement will ensure the facility can continue its important work, including the implementation of an acid rain recovery program for the Sudbury region, actions to address phosphorus in inland lakes and the Great Lakes, and efforts to address the effects of mercury emissions from coal-fired plants in Ontario and the U.S. Click here to continue reading

Canada ignored warnings of virus infecting farmed and wild salmon

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

The Guardian

Canada was warned in 2012 by its own scientists that a virus was infecting both farmed and wild salmon, but successive governments ignored the expert advice, saying for years that risks to salmon were low. Justin Trudeau’s government has said it will phase out open-pen industrial fish farms off the coast of British Columbia by 2025. But both his government and the previous Conservative government were in possession of a newly released report that linked large-scale farms and wild salmon to the highly contagious Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV). Click here to continue reading

B.C. communities struck by wildfires and floods brace for spring thaw

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

Ponoka News

The Nicola Valley is one of many regions in British Columbia still recovering from last year’s extreme weather as the thaw begins. Although the federal and provincial governments have pledged funds to guard communities against the effects of climate change, most protection measures won’t be in place in time for this season. Forecasters say it’s difficult to predict flooding more than a few days in advance so residents should always be prepared. Click here to continue reading

Wastewater now ‘one of our only reliable tools’ to detect COVID-19 prevalence

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

CTV News

With limited access to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing in provinces across the country, getting an accurate clinical picture of the spread of COVID-19 has become increasingly difficult in recent months. This has, however, paved the way for wastewater testing to play an increasingly critical role in monitoring COVID-19 transmission within communities. Click here to continue reading

B.C. flood survivor warns others to check insurance amid increase in climate disasters

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

CBC News

A survivor of British Columbia’s catastrophic floods last year is warning others to check their insurance policies after she said she received a payout of only $30,000 when her home, assessed at $414,000, was destroyed. Pam Velt, whose house collapsed into the Nicola River last November, said she and her husband, Paulus, believed they were fully insured. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Diesel tanker sinks off Tunisia risking environmental disaster

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

The Guardian

A tanker carrying 750 tonnes of diesel fuel from Egypt to Malta sank in the Gulf of Gabes off Tunisia’s southeast coast, sparking a rush to avoid a spill. The Equatorial Guinea-flagged Xelo was sailing from the Egyptian port of Damietta to Malta when it requested entry to Tunisian waters on Friday evening owing to bad weather. A disaster prevention committee would meet in the coming hours to decide on the measures to be taken. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: South Africa battered by more rain as flooding victims seek refuge

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

CBC News

Rains that have killed around 400 people and left thousands homeless in South Africa this week began pounding the east coast again on Saturday, threatening more flooding and forcing many to take refuge in community centres and town halls. The heavy downpours in Kwazulu-Natal Province have already knocked out power lines, shut off water services and disrupted operations at one of Africa’s busiest ports of Durban, the main eastern coastal city. Click here to continue reading

Waterless skincare: the beauty firms tapping into ethical cleansing

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

The Guardian

The climate crisis is driving a new trend that will change the look of your bathroom cabinet forever: waterless skincare. While wrapping-free, vegan toiletries have long had a place on British high streets, thanks to independent brands such as Lush, the new wave of waterless – or anhydrous – beauty products is driven by a combination of ethical concerns, innovations taken from Korean skincare and new developments in packaging. Click here to continue reading

Logging proposed next to the last habitat for the endangered Atlantic whitefish

PUBLISHED: 18 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The Petite Rivière watershed in southwestern Nova Scotia is home to the world’s only remaining population of Atlantic whitefish. It’s also where a new forestry cutblock on Crown land is proposed, much to the concern of environmentalists and scientists who say any activity could threaten the fish. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Bad air, dirty water: Health fears follow carbon capture plans

PUBLISHED: 14 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Carbon capture and storage projects are gaining traction since Congress approved $3.5 billion for them last year. The Global CCS Institute, a think tank seeking to advance these projects globally, called it the “single largest appropriation of money for CCS in the history of the technology.” But even if the technology was deployed successfully, several critics say the projects would pose threats to the public health of communities long plagued by air and water pollution. Click here to continue reading

Some Wheatley, Ont., residents allowed in homes after explosion find sewage water, mould

PUBLISHED: 14 April 2022

CBC News

There was relief — and tears — in Wheatley, Ont., as residents displaced by last summer’s explosion were allowed to return to their homes Wednesday and reunite with their neighbours. The residents have not been able to live in their properties since the August blast, and some have quite a task ahead before they can move back in. Becky and Bugsy Lamb regained access to their property to find about 61 centimetres of sewage and water flooding their basement. Mould has seeped up and covers everything in the house. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: South Africa braces for more heavy rain after floods kill hundreds

PUBLISHED: 14 April 2022

The Guardian

South Africa is bracing for more heavy rain in districts hit by massive and lethal downpours earlier this week. More than 300 people have died in flooding in and around the eastern coastal city of Durban in recent days. On Wednesday the president, Cyril Ramaphosa, described the flooding as a “catastrophe of enormous proportions”, directly linking it to the climate emergency. The South African weather service has warned of continuing high wind and rain bringing the risk of more flooding in KwaZulu-Natal and some other provinces over the Easter weekend. Click here to continue reading

Spring thaw could wreak havoc on B.C. communities damaged by floods and fire

PUBLISHED: 14 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Alanna Cowan has watched the Nicola River in British Columbia’s Interior turn the colour of chocolate milk and rise every spring, as warm weather melts snow from the surrounding mountains. It is part of an annual cycle that can cause minor flooding, but Cowan said this year feels more uncertain. Major wildfires, droughts and mudslides last year dramatically altered the landscape, raising questions about the river’s ability to handle the spring thaw, or freshet. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: East and Horn of Africa faces worst drought in decades

PUBLISHED: 14 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Agricultural workers in the east and Horn of Africa are preparing for their most severe drought in 40 years, as authorities warn that higher temperatures and less than normal rainfall was recorded by weather agencies in March and April this year. The Intergovernmental Authority on Development said rains will likely fail for a fourth consecutive year, triggering fears of increased cases of malnutrition, threats to livelihoods and severe risks for 29 million people in the region. Click here to continue reading

Okanagan water board asks for more federal funding to fight invasive mussels

PUBLISHED: 14 April 2022

Global News

The Okanagan Basin Water Board is urging the federal government to continue helping stop the westward spread of invasive mussels. This week, the OBWB said it sent a letter to newly appointed Federal Fisheries Minister Joyce Murray requesting a renewal of federal funding for invasive mussel outreach and education. The OBWB says the funding, which will expire in 2023 and also goes towards lake monitoring, was previously provided through the Canada Nature Fund for Aquatic Species at Risk. Click here to continue reading

Yukon’s record snowpack adds potential for flooding during ice breakup

PUBLISHED: 13 April 2022

Sylvan Lake News

Yukon’s snow survey shows record-high snowpacks in many of the basins the territory monitors. The bulletin says eight of 11 basins have the highest snowpack ever recorded, while the remaining three have above-average snow. The Yukon government bulletin says record snow in watersheds increases the potential for flooding during river ice breakup and spring snowmelt. It says the April survey usually represents the peak snow levels in most of the territory. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Extreme Atlantic hurricane seasons now twice as likely as in 1980s

PUBLISHED: 13 April 2022

The Guardian

Extremely active Atlantic hurricane seasons are now twice as likely as they were in the 1980s due to global heating, according to new research that warns the climate crisis is supersizing storms that threaten life and property in coastal areas. Climate breakdown has contributed to a “decisive increase” in intense hurricane activity since 1982. Researchers who undertook the analysis wrote that the growing hyperactivity of storms could be “robustly ascribed” to the rising temperature of the oceans. Click here to continue reading

Organization calls for renewed commitment to Great Lakes health 50 years after signing of Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement

PUBLISHED: 13 April 2022

CTV News

GLEN says cooperative action is needed to address threats to the basin such as harmful algal blooms, climate change, and new toxic substances as well as continuing to resolve issues that have not had the necessary attention over the last 50 years in the Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River basins. The federal governments of Canada and the U.S. will host a public forum on the agreement in September. Click here to continue reading

USask report identifies sectors putting global freshwater resources at risk

PUBLISHED: 13 April 2022

University of Saskatchewan

The Global Assessment of Private Sector Impacts on Water makes clear that several key industries like food products, textiles and apparel, and others that are not typically top-of-mind such as pharmaceuticals and mobile technology products, stand out as the biggest contributors to these threats. The report, co-developed with U.S.-based not-for-profit group Ceres, comes as the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns of how the world stands on the precipice of unavoidable and irreversible adverse impacts from rising temperatures. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Memphis may have the sweetest water in the world, but toxic waste could ruin it all – a comic

PUBLISHED: 12 April 2022

The Guardian

Hundreds of feet below the city of Memphis, Tennessee, an enormous collection of freshwater provides drinking water for at least a million residents. Memphis, the largest US city to rely 100% on groundwater, is said to have the sweetest water in the world. Across South Memphis, a cluster of low-income, mostly Black neighborhoods, there are a staggering number of toxic waste sites. These sites pose a dual threat: they risk contaminating the aquifer, and above ground, they endanger lives of residents with noxious emissions. Click here to continue reading

Maritimers debate best way forward in their struggle to hold back the sea

PUBLISHED: 12 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A windswept strip of former marshland provides the only link between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick and some experts say a long-awaited plan to protect it from flooding caused by climate change represents a “massive” missed opportunity. A recently released engineering study commissioned by both provincial governments lays out options for protecting the Chignecto Isthmus, over which approximately $50 million in trade flows every day. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Spring time: why an ancient water system is being brought back to life in Spain

PUBLISHED: 12 April 2022

The Guardian

High in la Alpujarra, on the slopes of the majestic Sierra Nevada in Andalucía, the silence is broken only by the sound of a stream trickling through the snow. Except it is not a stream but an acequia, part of a network of thousands of kilometres of irrigation channels created by Muslim peasant farmers more than a thousand years ago. The channel begins at an altitude of 1,800 metres (5,900ft) and, fed by the melting snow, for centuries supplied water to the village of Cáñar and beyond until it fell into disuse in the 1980s through the gradual depopulation of the area. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The ants go rafting: invasive fire ants take to Australian flood waters to colonise new areas

PUBLISHED: 12 April 2022

The Guardian

Invasive fire ants have used recent flooding in Queensland to expand their Australian invasion, teaming up and forming floating rafts with their bodies to allow them to survive for weeks at a time. Eradication officers in Queensland have captured photos of the dangerous ants forming the rafts in floodwaters. It’s one of the pest’s most impressive survival tricks. Click here to continue reading

Wave of pollution from cruise ships expected regardless of new federal wastewater rules

PUBLISHED: 12 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Environmental groups are hoisting red flags as the cruise ship season relaunches after the easing of COVID restrictions on the West Coast despite Ottawa’s recent announcement it will roll out stricter wastewater dumping rules. The federal government’s proposed environmental regulations are ambiguous, but signal Transport Canada is starting to acknowledge cruise ships have been taking advantage of Canada’s lax standards to dump dirty water waste along the B.C. coast, said Stand.earth’s shipping campaigner. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sunscreen chemicals accumulating in Mediterranean seagrass, finds study

PUBLISHED: 12 April 2022

The Guardian

Chemicals found in sunscreen lotions are accumulating in Mediterranean seagrass, a study has found. Scientists discovered ultraviolet filters in the stems of Posidonia oceanica, a seagrass species found on the coast of Mallorca and endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. The researchers believe the contamination is the result of recreational activities and waste discharges in the tourist destination. While the full impact of these chemicals on seagrass remains unknown, the researchers are concerned about potential harmful effects. Click here to continue reading

B.C. mayors ask Ottawa to make good on funding for last summer’s flood and fire repairs

PUBLISHED: 12 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

British Columbia mayors whose communities were devastated by last year’s flooding and wildfires want the federal government to deliver billions of dollars in promised funding as soon as possible. Abbotsford Mayor Henry Braun said he was among 28 mayors and members of regional districts who met with federal and provincial politicians to ask about the delivery of $5 billion from Ottawa. He said the estimated cost of bringing three dikes up to standards following flooding on the Sumas Prairie is as high as $2.9 billion. Click here to continue reading

Residents raise stink over proposed industrial feedlot near popular Alberta lake

PUBLISHED: 12 April 2022

Global News

A proposed industrial-sized livestock operation southwest of Edmonton is being met with pushback from residents concerned the project could jeopardize their property values and the local ecosystem. Last month, some were notified of an application by livestock producer G & S Cattle Ltd., to construct a new confined feeding operation (CFO) that would hold up to 4,000 cattle just a few kilometres west of Pigeon Lake. Click here to continue reading

Big fish to fry: Alberta’s aquaculture industry is making strides

PUBLISHED: 11 April 2022

Edmonton Journal 

There’s an old joke about good salespeople selling sand in the Sahara. It so happens that Alberta’s developing high-tech aquaculture industry is now becoming competitive enough to sell tilapia to customers in Vancouver — and fresh shrimp to local restaurants. Aquaculture raises aquatic organisms, such as fish and shellfish, under controlled or semi-controlled conditions. High-tech controls can increase not only yields, but the variety of species produced. Click here to continue reading

No water, no school: How water delivery issues disrupt learning for Inuit children in Nunavik

PUBLISHED: 11 April 2022

CBC News

Damaged or inadequate pumps, filtration or water storage tanks, mechanical breakdowns in water delivery trucks whose drivers are already overwhelmed by demand and an unforgiving winter climate mean that villages in Nunavik regularly face water supply issues. And when water runs out in a school — or when sewage tanks, which also must be emptied regularly, are full — the school must be shut down. Click here to continue reading

Water main break causes sinkhole in Garneau area

PUBLISHED: 11 April 2022

CTV News

Utility crews responded to a water main break that caused a sinkhole in the Garneau area Friday evening. EPCOR told CTV News Edmonton that crews were notified of the sinkhole after 6 p.m. at 107 Street and 85 Avenue. Officials shut off the water in the area at 7 p.m. as they started to make repairs, affecting five apartment buildings and one home. In the meantime, EPCOR says a water tank has been made available to residents. Click here to continue reading

Chile announces unprecedented plan to ration water as drought enters 13th year

PUBLISHED: 11 April 2022

The Guardian

As a punishing, record-breaking drought enters its 13th year, Chile has announced an unprecedented plan to ration water for the capital of Santiago, a city of nearly 6 million. The plan features a four-tier alert system that goes from green to red and starts with public service announcements, moves on to restricting water pressure and ends with rotating water cuts of up to 24 hours for about 1.7 million customers. Click here to continue reading

Sask. budget allocates $25 million for irrigation projects

PUBLISHED: 08 April 2022

The Western Producer

It’s been almost two years since Saskatchewan announced its plans for a $4-billion project at Lake Diefenbaker to double irrigation capacity but it is still in the pre-design phase. SaskBuilds minister Jim Reiter said $25 million allocated for irrigation in the recent provincial budget includes $23 million specifically for that project. The other money is for several other smaller projects that are under consideration. Click here to continue reading

Drone technology gives us the eyes of gods. Could it help us save arctic seals?

PUBLISHED: 08 April 2022

The Guardian

By 2035, it is estimated that the disappearance of Arctic sea ice will mean that around 7.5 million harp seals will lose their home. Using satellite technology, superhigh resolution images are being produced in which each pixel measures 30x30cm. This allows for the individual identification of harp seals. By working in conjunction with a large-scale Norwegian aerial and ship-based survey using helicopters, drones and an aeroplane, an accurate count of these animals may be possible for the first time. Click here to continue reading

Water Security Agency Launches Emergency Flood Damage Reduction Program for 2022

PUBLISHED: 07 April 2022

Government of Saskatchewan

The Water Security Agency (WSA) announces it is launching the Emergency Flood Damage Reduction Program (EFDRP) for 2022 to help Saskatchewan communities and residents respond to the challenge of possible flooding. The EFDRP was first established in 2011 to provide assistance with implementing emergency flood damage protection measures for communities, rural municipalities, businesses, non-profit organizations, individuals with rural yard sites, country residences and cottages to prevent damage from imminent risk of flooding. WSA is investing up to $500,000 for 2022. Click here to continue reading

Metro Vancouver residents only allowed to water lawns once a week as of May 1

PUBLISHED: 07 April 2022

Global News

The Metro Vancouver Regional District will only allow residents to water their lawns once a week, instead of twice, in the warmer months in the wake of B.C.’s record-breaking heatwave last summer. For almost two weeks last summer, daytime highs across the province sat 15 to 25 degrees above normal in what meteorologists called a “heat dome,” which in some cases caused a severe drought. Click here to continue reading

Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively donate to help get clean drinking water on all reserves, buoying U of A effort

PUBLISHED: 07 April 2022

Edmonton Journal

Hollywood couple Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively donated $500,000 to a Canadian Indigenous clean drinking water initiative, buoying efforts by a group of University of Alberta (U of A) graduate students. The Student Advocates for Public Health (SAPH), a group of U of A grad students, hosted a media availability last week calling for clean drinking water for all Indigenous communities throughout the country. Click here to continue reading

A Utah town is running dry. Its solution stoked an age-old water war

PUBLISHED: 07 April 2022

The Guardian

The ground in Cedar Valley is sinking and splintering. Fissures that snake through the region are a visible sign of Utah’s water woes, and the result of years spent overdrawing from an underground aquifer that supplies the area. And yet Cedar City continues to grow. Visitors flock to nearby national parks such as Zion and Bryce Canyon, adding to the flow of new residents expected to move here in the coming years. Cedar City is already the most populous in Utah’s Iron county, and finding more water has become an existential quest. Click here to continue reading

Thieving sea lions break into salmon farm and gorge on feast of fish

PUBLISHED: 07 April 2022

The Guardian

Dozens of thieving sea lions in western Canada have spent the last few weeks gorging on fish after brazenly slipping into an industrial salmon farm – and ignoring all attempts to make them move on. Cermaq, the aquaculture giant with operations in Norway, Chile and Canada, says the wily predators were able to evade netting and electric fences in late March as part of a “breach event” at the Rant Point farm near Tofino in British Columbia. Click here to continue reading

UCalgary and USask experts to collaborate on international project to transform water predictions

PUBLISHED: 07 April 2022

Water Canada

A team of hydrologists from the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and University of Calgary (UCalgary) comprises the Canadian contingent in an unprecedented international collaboration that aims to revolutionize flood predictions across North America. Unprecedented flooding over the past decade that has devastated hundreds of millions of people across the globe and caused billion of dollars in damage—including last year’s massive floods in British Columbia and the 2013 flood that hit Calgary—underlines the pressing need for this research. Click here to continue reading

Red Deerians urged to look-out for invasive goldfish and other species

PUBLISHED: 06 April 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Released pet goldfish have been known to lurk in the city’s stormwater ponds and rapidly reproduce – 882 of them were removed from Anders Pond at a cost of $250,000 in 2019-20. While City of Red Deer workers will still do visual inspections of stormwater ponds for invasive species and maintenance issues this spring and summer, the municipality has no more large-scale fish removal plans, due to budget constraints. Click here to continue reading

Freshwater mussels can inhibit bacterial diseases

PUBLISHED: 05 April 2022

Science Daily

Researchers have found brown trout better survived a Flavobacterium disease outbreak if the fish had larvae of freshwater pearl mussel in their gills. In another study, duck mussels were observed to filter and remove Flavobacterium from the water. Flavobacteria are a severe problem for fish farming and cause substantial economic losses. The “warm water disease” caused by Flavobacterium columnare is especially problematic since a functional vaccine against the bacterium is not available. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Hundreds of thousands of fish dead after NSW floods

PUBLISHED: 05 April 2022

The Guardian

Hundreds of thousands of fish have died after recent flooding in northern New South Wales caused “severe deoxygenation” of rivers, with researchers alarmed at discovering carcasses of species that traditionally tolerate lower oxygen levels. Scientists are still researching the full of extent of the destruction to marine life along the Richmond River, where multiple fish kill events occurred following flooding in late February and early March. Click here to continue reading

Hums, growls and farts. Fish sound the alert

PUBLISHED: 05 April 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Fish have plenty to say and we need to make more of an effort to listen to them and understand what they’re talking about, researchers say. The hums, grunts, squeals and even farts made by soniferous, or noise-making, fish are a noteworthy part of the ocean soundscape, said marine ecologist Kieran Cox. The former University of Victoria researcher was part of an international team that combed through more than 800 studies to catalogue vocal species and created a publicly accessible global library called FishSounds. Click here to continue reading

After 14 years, boil water advisory lifted for most in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory

PUBLISHED: 05 April 2022

CBC News

For the past 14 years, Andrew Brant and many others on Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory have had to haul all their water to their homes one jug at a time. His arms, and those of most fellow residents, will get a well-deserved break as the southeastern Ontario First Nation west of Kingston lifted five long-term water advisories on March 28 as they expanded connections to a new water treatment plant. The advisories had been in place since 2008. Click here to continue reading

Ducks Unlimited Canada and Weyerhaeuser Partner to Protect Canadian Wetlands

PUBLISHED: 04 April 2022

Water Canada

Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) and Weyerhaeuser Company (NYSE: WY) announced the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU), spanning five years and including $250,000 in new funding commitments. The new MOU will provide the framework for both organizations to work together to demonstrate a long-term commitment to support wetland and waterfowl stewardship throughout Weyerhaeuser’s Canadian operating areas located in the temperate and boreal forest regions of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Saskatchewan. Click here to continue reading

New Iqaluit water reservoir in the works as feds announce $214M in funding

PUBLISHED: 04 April 2022

CBC News

A new water reservoir system for Iqaluit and upgrades to the city’s water distribution system will be built over the coming years, thanks to roughly $214 million in federal funding. The money comes after Iqalummiut spent nearly two months last year unable to drink from the city’s water supply due to fuel contamination. They also spent over a week under a boil water advisory in January after the city received an influx of complaints about a fuel smell in the water. Click here to continue reading

Irrigation advocates hopeful about Alta. project

PUBLISHED: 01 April 2022

The Western Producer

Nearly $1 billion in investment for irrigation expansion across southern Alberta will be the largest in more than 100 years in the province, according to a relatively new consortium of the province’s irrigation districts. Richard Phillips, Irrigating Alberta chair, outlined the size and scope of the program that will see the more than 1.75 million acres currently under a pivot potentially grow by 200,000 acres. Click here to continue reading

Fighting invasive mussels comes with giant price tag

PUBLISHED: 01 April 2022

The Western Producer

Borders might affect how people conduct business in different regions but for invasive species, there are no boundaries in where, when or how they choose to disturb a natural eco-system. Top of the list in Montana is the devastating effect Quagga and Zebra mussels (collectively known as dreissenid mussels) could have for the agriculture industry if they establish themselves in waterways in the state, some of which flow into Alberta. Click here to continue reading

Early ice break on Red Deer River sparks concern, draws birds

PUBLISHED: 01 April 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Water began flowing on the Red Deer River on Sunday — one of the earliest ice-free dates in more than a century of record-keeping. Open channels of flowing water on the river were spotted on March 27 by analysts at a hydrometric station based in Red Deer. Alberta Environment and Parks stated that this station is operated by the Water Survey of Canada, which has data available from 1912 to 2020 (with three years missing). Click here to continue reading

Rebuilding key forage fish stocks for healthier East Coast fisheries

PUBLISHED: 01 April 2022

Water Canada

The long-term prosperity of Canada’s seafood sector depends on abundant fish stocks and healthy ecosystems. In Eastern Canada, pelagic forage fish, like herring and mackerel, play a vital role in the ecosystem and the fishing industry. Southern Gulf spring herring and Atlantic mackerel are two stocks that are in the critical zone. Urgent action must be taken in the short term to give these stocks a chance to recover and ensure the long-term sustainability and prosperity of East Coast fisheries. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Many of New Zealand’s glaciers could disappear in a decade, scientists warn

PUBLISHED: 31 March 2022

The Guardian

New Zealand’s glaciers are becoming “smaller and more skeletal” due to the effects of climate change and scientists predict many could disappear within a decade. An annual end-of-summer survey that records the snowline of more than 50 South Island glaciers has revealed continued loss of snow and ice. Click here to continue reading

Moisture ‘desperately’ needed across southern Alberta after dry winter

PUBLISHED: 31 March 2022

Global News

Farmers in southern Alberta are searching the sky for signs of rain following a dry winter and record-setting summer. “Hail was always my biggest worry, but this is the second year now I’m worried about moisture,” said farmer Leroy Newman. “It’s really scary how dry it is.” Newman is a fourth-generation farmer who has been working his family’s land near Blackie, Alta., for more than thirty years. Click here to continue reading

Transglobal expedition team spent fearful night on thin ice after losing Ford F-150

PUBLISHED: 31 March 2022

CBC News

The first time Torfi Johansson passed over ice northwest of Taloyoak, Nunavut, in a modified Ford F-150 truck — the ice had been 50 centimetres thick. So it came as a shock to him, and the rest of the Transglobal Car Expedition, when on the return journey from Resolute Bay to Cambridge Bay a few days later, the vehicle he was driving stopped in that area and began to sink. Click here to continue reading

B.C. landslide triggered 100-metre tall lake tsunami, study shows

PUBLISHED: 31 March 2022

CBC News

A massive landslide on B.C.’s remote central coast in 2020 triggered a lake tsunami over 100 metres tall, according to a new paper published by researchers from the University of Northern British Columbia. Described as a rare “hazard cascade,” the tsunami then sent a vast torrent of water or “outburst flood” into Elliot Creek, uprooting trees, soil, and rock as it surged down the valley. The slurry was, in turn, propelled into the Southgate River and then Bute Inlet, leaving a devastated landscape in its wake. Click here to continue reading

Albertan lands 350-pound sturgeon while kayak fishing in B.C.

PUBLISHED: 31 March 2022

CTV News

A Lethbridge man is celebrating the catch of a lifetime after he successfully hooked a 2.6 metre (8’6″) long sturgeon weighing an estimated 159 kilograms (350 lbs). Not only did Braeden Rouse hook the giant fish, he managed to pull it to shore. Rouse is a roofer currently working in B.C. in the Penticton area. Click here to continue reading

Police are investigating suspicious gasoline spill that could have polluted Vanier Woods pond

PUBLISHED: 30 March 2022

Red Deer Advocate

A suspected gasoline thief drilled into a vehicle’s gas tank, causing a spill that drained towards a Vanier Woods retention pond. The City of Red Deer was alerted at about 8 a.m. Tuesday by residents who reported the stench of gasoline in their East Vanier Woods neighbourhood. Half a dozen city of Red Deer environmental services workers spent the rest of the day placing booms on the stormwater system to try to prevent almost a barrel of gasoline from eventually ending up in the Red Deer River. Click here to continue reading

27th year of enhancing salmon habitats through Surrey’s SHaRP

PUBLISHED: 30 March 2022

Water Canada

Surrey’s Salmon Habitat Restoration Program (SHaRP) returns in 2022 for its 27th year, continuing to protect and enhance stream habitats as the City grows and develops. Surrey Council awarded four one-year contracts to Dillon Consulting Limited to continue to manage the program. Click here to continue reading

Water Security Agency supports growth through water management infrastructure in Saskatchewan

PUBLISHED: 30 March 2022

Water Canada

The Water Security Agency (WSA) announced $72M in planned investments to water infrastructure across Saskatchewan to help keep the province’s water supply safe and secure. With Budget 2022-23, WSA will ensure a safe and secure water supply for a growing population, increase the sustainability of Saskatchewan’s growing economy and build resiliency against extreme weather events. Click here to continue reading

Epcor water bills will go up starting Friday, city-wide lead water treatment begins late 2022

PUBLISHED: 29 March 2022

Edmonton Journal

Edmontonians’ water bills will start creeping up Friday, but rates would have been much higher without a one-time discount from Epcor. Monthly residential bills will increase about four per cent, and commercial about eight per cent, beginning April 1. A homeowner paying about $102 a month last year will be charged around $106 in 2022, and $113 by 2024, according to Epcor’s presentation. For commercial rates, a company charged an average of $560 in 2021 will pay about $603 this year and $670 by 2024. Click here to continue reading

Work at Grand Beach Provincial Park to improve water flow underway

PUBLISHED: 29 March 2022

Water Canada

The Manitoba government has started work to help improve water flow between the Grand Beach Lagoon and Lake Winnipeg, Climate, Environment and Parks Minister Jeff Wharton announced today. Historically, water has moved between the natural Grand Beach Lagoon and Lake Winnipeg, but levels have remained low for more than a decade. The reduced water flow has impacted recreational boating and angling in the lagoon, resulting in cottagers and park visitors having fewer opportunities to enjoy the waterway. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Ice shelf the size of New York City collapses in previously stable East Antarctica

PUBLISHED: 28 March 2022

CBC News

An ice shelf the size of New York City has collapsed in East Antarctica, an area long thought to be stable and not hit much by climate change, concerned scientists said Friday. The collapse, captured by satellite images, marked the first time in human history that the frigid region had an ice shelf collapse. It happened at the beginning of a freakish warm spell last week when temperatures soared more than 40 C warmer than normal in some spots of East Antarctica. Click here to continue reading

‘Extremely dry’: Farmers in southern Alberta gear up for drought conditions

PUBLISHED: 28 March 2022

CTV News

With the Lethbridge area not seeing much snow over the past few months, the dry conditions are already causing grief for some farmers.”We had some snowfall but most of that just blew away or blew around,” said James Johnson with Johnson Fresh Farms near Taber, Alta. “It’s still extremely dry.” Just weeks away from spring seeding, Johnson calls the dry conditions just another bump in the road. But there are more bumps on the road than usual this year. Click here to continue reading

Community collaboration studies microplastics in Okanagan Lake

PUBLISHED: 28 March 2022

Okanagan College

In what they hope will be a watershed moment for raising awareness of microplastics and their impact on both our local freshwater and downstream environments, several community partners and Okanagan College (OC) students have teamed up to determine if there are microplastics in Okanagan Lake and municipal wastewater. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Italians face fines for wasting water as supplies rationed amid drought

PUBLISHED: 28 March 2022

The Guardian

Italy has had one of its driest winters in the last 65 years, with rainfall 80% lower than the seasonal average. The situation has been more acute in northern regions, where some areas have been deprived of significant rainfall for three months or more. The Po, the country’s longest river, is at its lowest level recorded in winter since 1972. People living in some northern Italian towns face fines for wasting water as mayors ration supplies amid a severe drought. Click here to continue reading

Severity and sweep of Prairie droughts could spiral as climate changes

PUBLISHED: 28 March 2022

CBC News

Climate change will profoundly affect our water supply as summers grow hotter and winters shorter. While precipitation is predicted to increase overall, so will the duration and severity of droughts. The good news is that over the last century our ability to deal with drought conditions has improved. Crop types, tillage, even the timing of fertilizers can help plants get the moisture they need. Click here to continue reading

A culture of water stewardship bubbles up with Coors Seltzer’s help

PUBLISHED: 25 March 2022

Water Canada

A new partnership between New Acre Project, Coors Seltzer, and Change the Course is empowering farmers and ranchers in the North Saskatchewan River Watershed to create buffers on rivers, streams and wetlands. Through this collaboration, Coors Seltzer is successfully empowering local leadership to build resilience across the landscape. The effort is part of Coors Seltzer’s goal to fund restoration projects that restore more than six billion litres of water to the natural environment. Click here to continue reading

Researchers try packing down snow to preserve permafrost in N.W.T.

PUBLISHED: 24 March 2022

CBC News

Permafrost is defined as ground that is at or below zero degrees Celsius for more than two years, and it can consist of soil, rock, sand and ice. It underlies the majority of communities in the N.W.T., and the fact that it’s thawing threatens highways, churches, schools and other pieces of infrastructure. A report about climate change’s effect on N.W.T. infrastructure, says that communities in the Mackenzie Delta are “most vulnerable” to thawing permafrost because permafrost in the region is “warm” and contains a lot of ice. Click here to continue reading

Wolverine fish and blind eel among 212 new freshwater species

PUBLISHED: 24 March 2022

The Guardian

Scientists are celebrating 212 “new” freshwater fish species, including a blind eel found in the grounds of a school for blind children and a fish named Wolverine that is armed with a hidden weapons system. The New Species 2021 report, released by the conservation organization Shoal, shows just how diverse and remarkable the world’s often undervalued freshwater species are, and suggests there is plenty more life still to be discovered in the world’s lakes, rivers and wetlands. Click here to continue reading

First Nations supportive of salmon farming want federal licenses renewed

PUBLISHED: 24 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A coalition of First Nations is calling on the federal government to renew salmon farm licenses in B.C. this year, saying aquaculture is a vehicle for self-determination, economic development, and reconciliation. The politics of fish farming is heating up again as Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) prepares to review 79 salmon farm operating licenses slated to expire in June. Click here to continue reading

Stay off the ice: Return of warm weather has people gathering near Bow River

PUBLISHED: 24 March 2022

CTV News

Sections of ice along Calgary’s rivers remains in place, for now, but those who venture out atop the frozen water are potentially putting themselves, and others, at risk. CTV News spotted dozens of people walking on the ice or sitting on the edge of a cracked ice shelf on the Bow River between the Louise Bridge and Peace Bridge Wednesday evening, while Calgary Fire Department members were on scene for a dog rescue. Click here to continue reading

Why does Edmonton’s water smell a bit funky?

PUBLISHED: 23 March 2022

Global News

Have you noticed the tap water in Edmonton has smelled a little off lately? Worry not, it’s still safe to drink. The odor and slightly different taste to Edmonton’s water in recent days is a yearly occurrence, due to spring runoff. Every spring, as the snow melts and flows into the North Saskatchewan River, it brings with it large amounts of sediments, vegetation, and other organic material that is washed off the land. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Morrison’s green light for Queensland’s Hells Gates Dam threatens Great Barrier Reef, experts warn

PUBLISHED: 23 March 2022

The Guardian

The federal government’s announcement of $5.4bn to build the Hells Gates Dam in north Queensland commits money to a project with no final business case, no environmental approvals, and which experts say could further threaten the long-term health of the Great Barrier Reef. The prime minister announced Wednesday that his government would build the 2,100 gigalitre dam – about four times the size of Sydney Harbour – that could potentially support 60,000ha of new land for irrigated agriculture. Click here to continue reading

Town of Ponoka advises caution around Battle River due to ice, snow melt

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

Ponoka News

With the arrival of warmer temperatures, The Town of Ponoka is reminding residents to be cautious around the Battle River as the snow and ice are melting away. The town asks people to keep children and pets off of the river at all times, and keep dogs on a leash. The town advises the same is also true for the fishing pond at Lions Centennial Park, which is a storm water pond with water flowing through an inlet and outlet pipe throughout the year. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flood-affected Lismore residents with nowhere to go return to homes deemed uninhabitable

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

The Guardian

Residents in Lismore have been left with no choice but to move back into their houses that have been deemed uninhabitable, with some sleeping on swags in moldy rooms without electricity, as they are unable to find safe accommodation three weeks after floods devastated the town. The State Emergency Service had deemed more than 3,600 homes across the New South Wales northern rivers region as uninhabitable. Click here to continue reading

Surf town in Canada town bans plastic forks and knives

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The ban on plastic knives and forks at take-out establishments is Tofino’s latest stab at reducing waste after the district council passed a bylaw in 2020 banning single-use plastic bags, straws and polystyrene foam containers. Tofino council amended its bylaw last month to include a ban on single-use plastic cutlery and local businesses have until August to comply. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: NSW announces inquiry into flood crisis after criticism of state’s response

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

The Guardian

There has been widespread criticism of the handling of the crisis after people were left stranded on roofs in Lismore in the state’s northeast after it was inundated with a record 14.37-meter flood on 28 February. Many people had to be rescued by fellow residents on private watercraft, nine people died, thousands lost their homes and many were uninsured because of the high cost of premiums. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Conservationists call for ban on explosives to scare seals at salmon farm in federal waters off Tasmania

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

The Guardian

Environment groups have called on the federal government to rule out the use of explosives and guns loaded with “bean bag” rounds to scare seals at a proposed salmon farming trial in Commonwealth waters off the northwest coast of Tasmania. Under Tasmanian laws, the companies are allowed to use underwater explosives, known as “seal crackers”, to deter predators at farms in state waters. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Microplastics found deep underground in UK waters

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

The Guardian

Invisible microplastics have been found almost 400ft (120 metres) underground in UK water streams, according to the results of a citizen science project conducted by wild swimmers. More than 100 outdoor swimmers in the UK became “waterloggers”, collecting water samples from their favourite place for a dip using empty glass wine bottles. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Great Barrier Reef is not supposed to be white

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

One of the world’s leading coral scientists claims a sixth mass bleaching event is unfolding across the Great Barrier Reef, with official monitoring flights now underway all along the Queensland coastline. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) has confirmed monitoring flights are being conducted “along the length and breadth” of the 2,300-kilometre world heritage reef. Click here to continue reading

New report: Is the solution to water crises hiding right under our feet?

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

Water Canada

Groundwater accounts for 99% of all liquid freshwater on Earth. However, this natural resource is often poorly understood and consequently undervalued, mismanaged and even abused. According to the latest edition of the United Nations World Water Development Report published by UNESCO, the vast potential of groundwater, and the need to manage it sustainably, can no longer be overlooked. Click here to continue reading

15 P&C insurance companies join Ducks Unlimited Canada to mitigate flood risks in urban communities

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

Water Canada

As Canadian communities continue to grapple with extreme weather events, 15 leading insurance companies operating in the property and casualty (P&C) space have joined forces with Ducks Unlimited Canada, a leading environmental non-profit organization specializing in wetland conservation and using nature to defend against, well, nature. Click here to continue reading

 

Mamaweswen, The North Shore Tribal Council, and Water First announce new training internship for water treatment plant operators

PUBLISHED: 22 March 2022

Water Canada

This World Water Day, Mamaweswen, The North Shore Tribal Council (NSTC), with seven member First Nations in Northern Ontario, and Canadian charity Water First Education & Training Inc. announce their partnership to deliver the NSTC Water First Internship, a drinking water treatment and environmental water science training program for young Indigenous adults. Click here to continue reading

Verdict still out on this year’s snow

PUBLISHED: 18 March 2022

The Western Producer

Snow sitting on previously parched prairie soil may be just the thing to recharge moisture levels. But it depends. Melt conditions will determine how much moisture from that snow actually soaks in. As of early March, accumulated precipitation over the winter in Alberta and Saskatchewan varies but is in the normal to above the normal range. There are stubborn pockets of dry conditions plaguing areas in southeastern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan. Click here to continue reading

Bear Street redevelopment embraces stormwater solution

PUBLISHED: 18 March 2022

Water Canada

Prior to redevelopment, Bear Street had very little stormwater management and, in general, drained quite poorly. Much of the street drained untreated into the Town of Banff’s stormwater network and directly into the Bow River. For the Town of Banff, being situated within a National Park and UNESCO World Heritage site, it was imperative that stormwater be captured and effectively treated prior to release into the Bow River. Click here to continue reading

Wildlife corridor in Lake Ontario watershed now protected land, conservation group says

PUBLISHED: 18 March 2022

Global News

The Nature Conservancy of Canada says a stretch of a major wildlife corridor, part of which is shown in a handout photo, within the Lake Ontario watershed is now protected land. In a news release, the organization says 50 square kilometers will be protected and cared for in the Hastings Wildlife Junction in Ontario, located between Belleville and Bancroft, thanks to funding from the provincial and federal governments and private donations. Click here to continue reading

Emergency preparedness ministers say a national flood insurance program is needed

PUBLISHED: 18 March 2022

Sylvan Lake News

Federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for emergency preparedness are working to launch a new national flood insurance program to protect homeowners in high-risk flood zones. A task force made up of government leaders and representatives from the Insurance Bureau of Canada is expected to release a final report on the program later this spring after two years of work. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Microplastics from European rivers spreading to Arctic seas, research shows

PUBLISHED: 17 March 2022

The Guardian

Microplastics from European rivers are finding their way to Arctic seas, research suggests. These tiny plastic particles, which come from clothing fibres, car tyres, cosmetics and many more sources, have been found across the entire planet, from the summit of Mount Everest to the deepest oceans. Click here to continue reading

New $28 million plant will ensure better quality water is returned to Red Deer River

PUBLISHED: 17 March 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Cleaner, clearer water will flow back into the Red Deer River this spring from Red Deer’s water treatment plant, following the completion of a $28-million project. The city’s new residuals management plant, which was five years in the making, is almost ready for start-up. The goal is to have healthier aquatic life in the Red Deer River as fish will no longer be exposed to deposits of chemical-soaked sand. Click here to continue reading

Tire residue in rain runoff kills fish in urban streams

PUBLISHED: 17 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Residue from vehicle tires contains a chemical highly toxic to several important species of fish when it washes into streams, says new Canadian research. “It seems almost like the fish are suffocating from the inside,” said University of Saskatchewan toxicologist Markus Brinkmann. “It’s not the nicest thing to observe.” Brinkmann’s research has added to a growing body of research looking into the effect of tire residue when it enters the environment. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Great Barrier Reef hit by sixth mass bleaching event, leading coral scientist says

PUBLISHED: 17 March 2022

The Guardian

One of the world’s leading coral scientists claims a sixth mass bleaching event is unfolding across the Great Barrier Reef, with official monitoring flights now under way all along the Queensland coastline. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) has confirmed monitoring flights are being conducted “along the length and breadth” of the 2,300km world heritage reef. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Can oysters save New York City from the next big storm?

PUBLISHED: 17 March 2022

The Guardian

Dozens of restaurants in the city are donating its oyster shells to support restoration projects like Living Breakwaters, a $107m effort to shore up the disappearing coastline of New York City’s Staten Island. The project will consist of nearly a half-mile of partially submerged breakwaters, strategically covered in recycled oyster reefs. As those reefs grow, the project’s designers hope they will help control flooding and coastal erosion while providing new habitat for abundant aquatic life. Click here to continue reading

Dry conditions nothing new for most prairie producers

PUBLISHED: 17 March 2022

The Western Producer 

It’s been a stressful past year for ranchers across the Prairies faced with feed shortages caused by last summer’s drought and high feed prices. But it’s an environment producers need to get used to, according to a group of ranchers participating in a chat as part of the Beef and Forage Research Forum hosted by the Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association earlier this month. Click here to continue reading

Producers find benefits in electrolyzed water

PUBLISHED: 17 March 2022

The Western Producer

Western Canadian livestock producers and greenhouse operators are talking about the added benefits of using electrolyzed water. The resulting water solutions can be used as a disinfectant/oxidizer, and applied as fog, mist or spray. Anolyte is also added to drinking water and kills many viruses and bacteria. It is commonly used commercially for cleaning and preserving produce and disinfecting in health-care environments. Click here to continue reading

B.C. premier raises concerns with prime minister about jobs if fish farms close

PUBLISHED: 17 March 2022

CBC News

Any federal government plans to move away from open-net pen salmon farms in British Columbia should come with transition help for the industry and workers, says Premier John Horgan. A letter dated March 10 from Horgan to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said concern is widespread on Vancouver Island that the federal government is poised to make a decision that could threaten hundreds of jobs and the economies of coastal communities. Click here to continue reading

‘Lots of need’: Canadian charity bringing clean water to Ukraine

PUBLISHED: 16 March 2022

CTV News

A Canadian charity supplying clean drinking water to developing nations has turned its attention to the plight of refugees fleeing war in Ukraine. Lifewater Canada has partnered with a group in Poland that is trucking water and other necessities into Ukraine. Prior to the war in Ukraine, Lifewater concentrated its efforts in supplying clean, water to people in Haiti and in rural Africa — in Kenya, Liberia, and Nigeria. Click here to continue reading

Stemming the tide of invasive species

PUBLISHED: 16 March 2022

McGill University

Ballast water release from ocean vessels has introduced hundreds of invasive species to coastal ecosystems worldwide, causing major disruptions to fisheries and biodiversity. Attempts to control aquatic invasions have met with mixed success in general. However, a new study suggests that a bi-national regulation targeting ships entering the Great Lakes since the mid-2000s has been remarkably effective in reducing a large proportion of the invasive species in the world’s largest freshwater ecosystem. Click here to continue reading

Ottawa promises national insurance for homes in high-risk flood areas

PUBLISHED: 16 March 2022

The Globe and Mail 

Climate change is fuelling more extreme weather, creating greater and more expensive flood risks across the country. Ottawa has been in talks with the insurance industry about a national plan for overland flood coverage since the 2013 floods in Calgary and High River, Alta. Those discussions gained a new urgency after storms across southern B.C. in November caused what could end up being Canada’s costliest natural disaster to date. Click here to continue reading

We still have a chance to stop the Arctic summer sea ice from melting

PUBLISHED: 15 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A 2019 study found that if the Arctic Ocean is free of sea ice during the sunlit part of the year, it could generate the same heat as 25 years worth of human-caused carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at today’s level. Along with exacerbating global warming, losing Arctic summer sea ice will erode coastlines, devastate Arctic ecosystems, destroy the infrastructure and ways of life of northern communities and cause global sea-level rise unless something changes — and fast. Click here to continue reading

River Watch program launches as overland flooding remains a possible threat

PUBLISHED: 15 March 2022

CBC News 

As winter nears an end, the New Brunswick government is advising residents who live near flood-prone areas to have emergency preparations ready. The province advises anyone living near an area prone to flooding to have emergency preparations in place until the snow is completely gone and water levels return to normal. This can be viewed on River Watch, which is an online platform that shows readings of water levels in the St. John River and its tributaries. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘It makes sense to improve’: flood-hit mayors fear road rebuild won’t reduce risk

PUBLISHED: 14 March 2022

The Guardian

Leaders in northern New South Wales are concerned they will not be able to “build back better” with flood relief money and will instead be forced to rebuild the same flood-prone roads and bridges, leaving communities at risk. While Transport for NSW works to restore the most critical of the hundreds of roads that have been damaged or swept away in the disaster, councils are also turning their thoughts to the future. Click here to continue reading

Multi-Phase Fraser River Erosion Protection Project Completed

PUBLISHED: 14 March 2022

City of Chilliwack 

Approximately 210 metres of rock armouring (riprap) has recently been installed along the Fraser River just downstream from the Camp Hope Intake, completing a multi-year, multi-phase Fraser River erosion protection project. As part of Chilliwack’s Flood Response Plan, this rock armouring stabilizes the river bank, to protect it from heavy river flows. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Thousands more to live on flood plain on Sydney’s fringes if developments allowed to proceed

PUBLISHED: 11 March 2022

The Guardian

Thousands more people could soon be living on an extensive flood plain on the fringes of Sydney if land already approved for development were to proceed, according to planning officials, councillors and the New South Wales government’s own data. Blacktown city council alone has more than 10,000 homes already planned, with that region’s population expected to swell by half to more than 600,000 over the next two decades. Click here to continue reading

What one N.W.T. town can teach us about dealing with future floods

PUBLISHED: 11 March 2022

CBC News

After going through a devastating flood in May 2021, the people of Fort Simpson, N.W.T., not only had to hunker down for a massive cleanup but also reckon with the fact that climate change was making the threat of flooding ever-present. Fort Simpson is home to about 1,200 people, about two-thirds of whom live on an island accessed by a short causeway that connects to the rest of the community, which is located on a hilly boreal forest landscape. Click here to continue reading

Can we keep our freshwater fresh?

PUBLISHED: 11 March 2022

Water Canada

One of the most serious threats to our freshwater is contamination from salts (also known as freshwater salinization). Recent studies suggest that salts can interact with soils and infrastructure to mobilize multiple contaminants such as metals to create chemical cocktails in ground and surface waters. Click here to continue reading

West Coast celebrates herring spawn spectacle

PUBLISHED: 10 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A natural wonder that peaks in March, the herring spawn is a herald of spring, eagerly anticipated and celebrated by humans and wildlife alike. The din echoing off the waters of Hornby and Denman islands, the epicenter of the return, is particularly loud as raucous gulls, seabirds and sea lions cry and bark while feasting on the last abundant herring return along the B.C. coast. Click here to continue reading

UN ocean treaty is ‘once in a lifetime’ chance to protect the high seas

PUBLISHED: 10 March 2022

The Guardian

The world has a “once in a lifetime” chance to protect the high seas from exploitation, warned scientists and environmentalists, as negotiators meet at the UN headquarters in New York this week to hammer out a new treaty on the oceans. One scientist described the treaty, which will set out a legal framework to protect biodiversity and govern the high seas, as the most significant ocean protection agreement for four decades. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sydney Harbour turns brown as authorities warn against swimming after floods

PUBLISHED: 10 March 2022

The Guardian

Pollution washed into Sydney’s beaches and waterways could linger for days, with state authorities urging swimmers to exercise caution after the flood disaster. Sydney Harbour turned brown as a result of storm water carrying soil and debris, and algal blooms have appeared on the usually pristine sands of Hyams beach in the Jervis Bay region. Click here to continue reading

Below normal runoff expected for southern Sask.

PUBLISHED: 10 March 2022

The Western Producer

Despite significant amounts of snow this winter, much of Saskatchewan is still expecting below to well below normal snowmelt runoff in the south. An area east of Moose Jaw should see normal conditions, but the southwest remains at risk for water supply issues and possible water quality concerns later. In central regions, runoff is expected to be above to well above normal. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sydney records wettest start to a year ever as BoM warns of more flooding to come

PUBLISHED: 09 March 2022

The Guardian

A trickle in Sydney’s rain gauge on Wednesday meant the city is yet to get a dry day in the past 16, extending the record wet start to any year for the Harbour City. The 0.2mm reading so far on Wednesday – the smallest measure the Bureau of Meteorology counts as rain – nudged the rainfall total at Sydney’s Observatory Hill to 872.6mm. Click here to continue reading

Pacific Salmon Treaty fails to conserve B.C. fish, say advocates

PUBLISHED: 09 March 2022

Sylvan Lake News

The Pacific Salmon Treaty (PST) is under fire following a report suggesting that Alaskan fisheries are impacting struggling salmon populations by intercepting a significant number of B.C.-bound fish. In recent years, B.C. salmon numbers have hit record lows. Only two wild chinook salmon returned to the upper Kennedy watershed in 2021, meaning the population has seen a 98 per cent decrease, according to the Central Westcoast Forest Society. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sydney floods captured on social media as roads turn into rivers and cars become boats

PUBLISHED: 08 March 2022

The Guardian

Sydney residents have pulled out their phones and posted videos on social media as cars floated down flooded streets, bridges were inundated, homes soaked and Manly Dam spilled – threatening hundreds of homes – while torrential rain continued to fall on Australia’s biggest city claiming two lives. Click here to continue reading

Canada and Prince Edward Island invest in new water infrastructure for Charlottetown

PUBLISHED: 08 March 2022

Government of Canada

Funding will support a study of the existing undersized stormwater system in Charlottetown in order to replace it to help meet the increasing needs and development of the community. Funding will also support the construction of a new 800 metre stormwater system that will help the City collect and manage storm flows during peak rainfall events, eliminating the possibility of future flash flood events. Once complete this project will help protect homes and businesses, creating a more resilient and safer community. Click here to continue reading

Bottles, cans, batteries: octopuses found using litter on seabed

PUBLISHED: 08 March 2022

The Guardian

Whether it’s mimicking venomous creatures, or shooting jets of water at aquarium light switches to turn them off, octopuses are nothing if not resourceful. Now, an analysis of underwater images suggests octopuses are increasingly using discarded bottles, cans, and other human rubbish as shelter or as a sanctuary for their eggs. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sydney residents evacuated from homes overnight as heavy rain brings fresh flood risks

PUBLISHED: 08 March 2022

The Guardian

Thousands of residents in Sydney’s south-west were ordered to evacuate overnight as heavy rain swelled rivers, with fresh flood risks for places as far apart as the Illawarra and Kempsey in northern New South Wales. All up, the NSW State Emergency Service has issued a total of 54 evacuation orders across the state and has 16 warnings out for possible evacuation. The evacuation orders to leave cover an estimated 37,530 people. Click here to continue reading

Severe weather warning extended to cover much of eastern NSW, with heavy rain and flash flooding forecast

PUBLISHED: 07 March 2022

The Guardian

A massive stretch of the New South Wales coast is forecast to be hit by dangerous weather with a second east coast low set to deliver heavy rains and strong winds. The Bureau of Meteorology has expanded its warning zone for towns and communities stretching almost 1,000km from Coffs Harbour south towards the Victorian border. Click here to continue reading

Ottawa leaving West Coast fishing sector to flounder after salmon closures, harvesters say

PUBLISHED: 07 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

The West Coast fishing sector is being hung out to dry and deserves a just transition like other climate-affected industries after the federal government put in widespread closures to the salmon fishery last year, the fish harvesters union says. Nearly 60 per cent of B.C.’s commercial salmon fisheries were shuttered last year by the federal government in a radical bid to save salmon stocks, many on the brink of extinction. Click here to continue reading

Southern Alberta snowfall ‘good news’ for farmers amid dry winter

PUBLISHED: 04 March 2022

Global News

Following a dry and hot 2021, the agriculture industry in southern Alberta is hoping for more moisture ahead of growing season. Thursday’s snowfall is something grain producer John McKee said is “very good news.” “When Mother Nature is cooperating it just makes our lives so much easier,” he said. “It removes the stress.” Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Before and after aerial pictures show how floods swept through Queensland and NSW towns

PUBLISHED: 04 March 2022

The Guardian

Across south-east Queensland, at least 33 areas were inundated by more than 1m of rainfall between 23 and 28 February. In Brisbane 792.8mm fell over the six days to 9am on 28 February, flooding an estimated 15,000 homes across the city. Thousands were told to evacuate as flood waters then surged in the northern rivers district of NSW, laying waste to towns and washing away cattle. The low-lying city of Lismore experienced its worst flooding since modern records began. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Heartbreaking’: Australia’s east coast reels from worst floods in living memory

PUBLISHED: 04 March 2022

The Guardian

The east coast of Australia has been battered by more than a week of torrential rain, as communities begin to survey the wreckage of fatal flash flooding that has left townships looking like war zones. South-east Queensland and the north coast of New South Wales have borne the brunt of the “one in-1,000 year” catastrophic weather conditions, which have claimed at least 17 lives. Click here to continue reading

Cutting-edge lab on remote B.C. island teasing out mysteries of ocean acidification

PUBLISHED: 04 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Ocean acidification and hypoxia (OAH) have been identified by the province as one of the top climate risks for the B.C. coast. The province and the Hakai Institute are collaborating with scientists, communities, First Nations and various industries to draft an OAH action plan, due this spring, to try to mitigate and adapt to ocean changes triggered by the climate crisis. Click here to continue reading

Nanaimo begins major water supply upgrade

PUBLISHED: 04 March 2022

City of Nanaimo

The project provides service to central and north Nanaimo, including Nanaimo Regional General Hospital (NRGH). A broken water main on Bowen Road in April 2020 interrupted water supply to the hospital and could have caused significant damage to local businesses and residents. City Council re-organized the water-funded capital plan to undertake this project which will bolster resilience, support growth throughout Nanaimo and ensure NRGH has a dedicated potable water and fire protection feed. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Wild fish stocks squandered to feed farmed salmon, study finds

PUBLISHED: 03 March 2022

The Guardian

Shoppers’ appetite for salmon is causing millions of tonnes of nutritious mackerel, sardines and anchovies to be wasted as fish feed, according to new research. Its authors say farming salmon is an inefficient way to produce nutritious seafood, calculating that half to 99% of minerals, vitamins and fatty acids in the wild-caught fish are not retained when fed to farmed Atlantic salmon. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: NSW floods: Sydney and Illawarra dodge east coast low after 500,000 people faced evacuation across state

PUBLISHED: 03 March 2022

The Guardian

Sydney and the Illawarra region of New South Wales have avoided the worst effects of the devastating east coast low that instead eased and shifted west over Newcastle and the Hunter region. Newcastle remains under a severe weather warning with falls of 60 to 100mm possible over six hours and the associated risk of flash flooding. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Tasmania records driest summer in 40 years as La Niña ‘swings the wind around’

PUBLISHED: 03 March 2022

The Guardian

While Queensland and New South Wales have been hit with historic rainfall and floods, Tasmania has endured its driest summer in 40 years. The island state’s west and south-west – both sparsely populated and typically wet – recorded their lowest levels of rainfall on record, the Bureau of Meteorology said. Click here to continue reading

Federal delay of wastewater rules allows ships to continue polluting ocean

PUBLISHED: 03 March 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Federal delays are allowing billions of litres of wastewater to be dumped in Canadian waters including marine protected areas, an environmental group says. In a report released this week, the World Wildlife Fund said the federal government has yet to follow through on a three-year-old commitment to bring in new regulations on what waste ships can release into the oceans. It says that lack of progress is allowing ships to keep releasing bilgewater, sewage, grey water and other wastewater. Click here to continue reading

Flood mapping study to help community become flood-resilient

PUBLISHED: 02 March 2022

City of Vernon

A new flood mapping study has been completed to help Vernon become a flood resilient community. Residents are now invited to tour a new online interactive “Flood Story” to learn about the study and what it means for Vernon’s future. The Detailed Flood Mapping, Risk Analysis and Mitigation Study focused on the risks and potential impacts to the Vernon community if significant flooding were to occur on Vernon Creek or BX Creek. Click here to continue reading

Iqaluit says boil water advisory likely to last several days

PUBLISHED: 02 March 2022

CBC News

Iqaluit is under a city-wide boil water advisory again, and will likely remain so for several days, according to the municipal government. The advisory stems from repairs city workers were doing Tuesday to a water valve, which led to a water line losing pressure. Though precautionary, this is the latest in a series of water issues in the Nunavut capital over the past six months. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Floods and livestock losses leave NSW and Queensland farmers reeling from third disaster in three years

PUBLISHED: 02 March 2022

The Guardian

Farmers have been left reeling by “devastating” losses of livestock and machinery amid severe flooding in southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales, with concern some may not be able to recover from the latest disaster. There had been “enormous” infrastructure losses including tractors, sheds, fencing, generators, and irrigation equipment, as well as feed. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Ballina flood: thousands of homes impacted with ‘peak to continue for a number of hours’

PUBLISHED: 02 March 2022

The Guardian

Six thousand homes in the Ballina area may have been impacted by flood waters, the State Emergency Service says, as prolonged power and phone outages hamper communications. Flood waters surged in the northern New South Wales coastal town on Tuesday morning, with water bubbling out of the gutters as the 1.8 metre king tide met the swollen Richmond River. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Sydney, Australia, braces for flash floods with torrential rain in forecast

PUBLISHED: 02 March 2022

CBC News

Sydney was preparing on Wednesday for dangerous flash flooding as population centres farther north began a massive cleanup operation after record floods that have claimed at least 14 lives along Australia’s east coast in recent days. The torrential rain — as much as 20 centimetres — is forecast for Australia’s largest city and surrounding areas late Wednesday and early Thursday. Click here to continue reading

Proactive detection of water leaks saves City half a million dollars last year

PUBLISHED: 01 March 2022

City of Hamilton

In early 2021, after a two-year-long pilot project, the City of Hamilton launched a program to proactively detect water leaks in underground pipes. In 2021, the program helped to locate a total of 109 leaky underground pipes, saving the City an estimated $537,068. In 2021, the City treated and distributed 74,946,877 cubic metres of safe, fresh drinking water to homes across Hamilton. Click here to continue reading

Support for Marine Research in Cape Breton

PUBLISHED: 01 March 2022

Government of Nova Scotia 

Invest Nova Scotia is providing $327,000 over two years to create an innovation hub for local industries in the marine and aquaculture sector. The hub will provide a space for the sector to solve business challenges, explore applied research ideas and collaborate with industry experts. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: At least 8 killed as major floods swamp Australia

PUBLISHED: 01 March 2022

CBC News

Parts of Australia’s third-most populous city Brisbane were underwater Monday after heavy rain brought record flooding to some East Coast areas and killed eight people. The flooding in Brisbane and its surroundings is the worst since 2011 when the city of 2.6 million people was inundated by what was described as a once-in-a-century event. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Brisbane flood: residents assess damage to homes as clean-up efforts begin

PUBLISHED: 01 March 2022

The Guardian

Queensland authorities estimate 15,000 properties sustained damage in the flooding, caused by a “rain bomb” weather system that dumped more than 1 metre of water on most of the city. The volume was roughly equal to 80% of Brisbane’s annual average rainfall. Data from the Bureau of Meteorology revealed a string of broken records from the flooding rain in Queensland. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Eastern Australian states hit by major flooding after ‘rain bomb’ weather event

PUBLISHED: 28 February 2022

The Guardian

The flood broke through the levee before daybreak. By the time many residents of Lismore in northern New South Wales woke up on Monday, the water had begun to lap at their doorsteps. Those unable to flee climbed on to upper levels of their homes, then out onto their rooftops. Hundreds were rescued by boats and kayaks and jetskis; many others are still unaccounted for. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Climate scientists warn global heating means Australia facing more catastrophic storms and floods

PUBLISHED: 28 February 2022

The Guardian

Catastrophic flooding on the scale of the disaster hitting Queensland and New South Wales is becoming more likely as the planet heats due to greenhouse gas emissions, climate scientists have warned. The latest major assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) found global warming caused by humans was causing dangerous and widespread disruption, with many effects expected to be more severe than predicted. Click here to continue reading

A significant climate danger is lurking in B.C.’s ocean

PUBLISHED: 28 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Lurking in B.C.’s ocean is a lesser-known climate risk experts say has the potential to cause significant harm to the marine ecosystem and the economies of coastal communities. Now scientists and stakeholders are developing an action plan to deal with the dual dangers of ocean acidification and hypoxia — or dangerously low oxygen levels — in the marine environment. Click here to continue reading

Enviros call on Canada to strengthen our rules after genetically modified aquarium fish escapes into the Brazilian wild

PUBLISHED: 28 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

For the first time, the escape and reproduction of a genetically engineered (GM) aquarium fish has been documented by scientists. The GM zebrafish — which is injected with genes from jellyfish to make them fluorescent — escaped in Brazil, but some say the event has heavy implications for Canada. Click here to continue reading

Flooded communities’ real estate prices can take a significant hit

PUBLISHED: 25 February 2022

Calgary Herald

Communities in Canada experiencing catastrophic flooding can expect to see negative impacts on home resales and pricing, a new study shows. The report from the University of Waterloo released this month examined major floods in five Canadian cities between 2009 and 2020 and found an average reduction in home sale prices of 8.2 percent. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: UN weighs global plastic treaty to combat pollution in oceans, waterways

PUBLISHED: 25 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Delegates from United Nations member countries are considering proposals for a binding global treaty to curb plastic pollution. The U.N. Environment Assembly, meeting Feb. 28 to March 2 in Kenya’s capital Nairobi, is expected to propose an international framework to address the growing problem of plastic waste in the world’s oceans, rivers, and landscape. Click here to continue reading

PFAS pollution led to contamination of US drinking water wells, study finds

PUBLISHED: 25 February 2022

The Guardian

Pollution by toxic PFAS “forever chemicals” in America’s aquifer system has led to widespread contamination of private and public drinking water wells, data from a new study by the US Geological Survey finds. The study, published in Environmental Science and Technology, detected PFAS chemicals in 20% of private wells and 60% of public wells sampled in 16 eastern states. Click here to continue reading

Alberta farmers face decisions unless moisture arrives

PUBLISHED: 25 February 2022

The Western Producer

Precipitation totals that have declined to 25- to 50-year lows in parts of southern Alberta are causing some farmers to consider their options should dry conditions persist into the spring. About half of southern Alberta south of the Trans-Canada Highway is experiencing 25-year lows in accumulated precipitation from Feb. 16, 2021, to Feb. 15, 2022. Click here to continue reading

Recent drought teaches farmers lessons in how to adapt

PUBLISHED: 25 February 2022

The Western Producer

Farmers and their organizations have had to adapt to the shocks of drought and the pandemic. Many younger farmers have never experienced drought, so they’ve had that chance now to learn how to manage through excessive dryness. That’s a marked contrast to the prevailing situation in the 2000s, when soybean acreage was soaring and soils were often saturated. Click here to continue reading

Wetter times may loom on the prairie horizon

PUBLISHED: 25 February 2022

The Western Producer

There may be a glimmer of hope this spring for prairie producers who need a break from bone-dry fields and drought-plagued pastures. Factors are lining up to bring relief to drought-stricken areas this year, although patience will be required. The depth of Western Canada’s soil moisture deficit is still severe in many areas, particularly central and southwestern Saskatchewan and southern Alberta. Click here to continue reading

Ontario Supports Clean, Renewable and Affordable Energy

PUBLISHED: 25 February 2022

Government of Ontario

As part of ongoing efforts to modernize the province’s 50-year-old environmental assessment program to better serve the needs of Ontarians now and into the future, the Ontario government announced changes to build low-risk waterpower projects faster, such as expansions or changes to an existing facility. Click here to continue reading

The Big Water Deadline that Thousands Will Miss

PUBLISHED: 25 February 2022

The Tyee

In just days from now, March 1 to be exact, the B.C. government is going to find itself in difficult straits. That’s the day that all businesses in the province who rely on well water or groundwater to run their operations must, by law, have applied for a license to continue to use that water. The trouble is, it looks likely that three-quarters of all such businesses, nearly 15,000 in total, will not have applied for those licenses, and therefore will be using water illegally at the end of this month. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Tesla faces day of reckoning on water supply for planned German plant

PUBLISHED: 24 February 2022

Reuters

Tesla may lose the water supply contract for its long-delayed German plant if environmental groups win a court case challenging a license granted to its water supplier at a hearing next week. The Frankfurt Oder administrative court will hear on March 4 a complaint filed by local groups claiming the Brandenburg environmental ministry carried out insufficient checks before granting the license to the Wasserverband Strausberg-Erkner (WSE) utility. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘We can’t make it rain’: California farmers left out to dry as US government allots no water

PUBLISHED: 24 February 2022

The Guardian

Officials are preparing for yet another critical water year in California as the state remains mired in drought. The federal government said Wednesday that it won’t deliver water to farmers in California’s agricultural belt, which produces roughly a quarter of the nation’s food, due to the extreme water shortages that are expected to deepen if the direly dry conditions continue through March. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Dolphins hit by Deepwater Horizon spill at risk from new drilling and river plan

PUBLISHED: 24 February 2022

The Guardian

Nearly 80% of dolphins exposed to oil in the Deepwater Horizon disaster remain badly affected nearly 12 years later, according to new research, even as the Biden administration continues to approve leases for oil and gas drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. Scientists looked at the long-term impact of the oil spill on bottlenose dolphins living in Barataria Bay, near New Orleans. Click here to continue reading

Feds float $11.8 million for Indigenous commercial fishing ventures on West Coast

PUBLISHED: 24 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Ottawa is committing close to $12 million to boost sustainable Indigenous fishing enterprises on the West Coast. The funds will support new businesses, training opportunities and increased access to fisheries for 31 Indigenous commercial fishing companies involving 117 First Nations across B.C. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Antarctic sea ice falls to lowest level since measurements began in 1979

PUBLISHED: 24 February 2022

The Guardian

Sea ice around Antarctica has dropped to its lowest level in more than 40 years, according to preliminary data from satellites. Climate scientists say the record drop can’t yet be linked to global heating but urgent research is needed to work out why the region’s sea ice had broken a record last set only five years ago. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Black carbon pollution from tourism and research increasing Antarctic snowmelt, study says

PUBLISHED: 24 February 2022

The Guardian

Black carbon pollution from tourism and research activities in Antarctica is likely increasing snowmelt on the continent by an estimated 83 tonnes for each visitor, according to new research. Scientists have estimated that the black carbon produced by vessels, planes, and diesel generators results in 23mm of additional snowmelt each summer in the most frequently visited areas of the ice-covered landmass. Click here to continue reading

Manitoba invests in water quality testing projects in Northern Communities

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2022

Government of Manitoba

The Manitoba government is partnering with three northern Indigenous communities to improve access to timely testing of water quality samples by establishing a pilot bacteriological water testing site in Thompson Indigenous, Reconciliation and Northern Relations Minister Alan Lagimodiere and Environment, Climate and Parks Minister Jeff Wharton announced. The province has invested $30,000 in supplying a TECTA machine to the Thompson testing facility. The self-contained unit is used to analyze water samples for bacteria. Click here to continue reading

Government of Canada supports expedition undertaking first of its kind pan-Pacific salmon survey

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2022

Government of Canada

In recent years, climate change, habitat loss and fishing pressures have negatively affected Pacific salmon at every stage of their lifecycle. In an effort to fill gaps in our understanding of salmon distribution, productivity, and survival in coastal and high seas environments – under changing global climate conditions – the research ship CCGS Sir John Franklin is setting off on a five-week expedition in the North Pacific Ocean to undertake the first ever pan-Pacific survey of five species of pacific salmon. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Climate change is intensifying Earth’s water cycle at twice the predicted rate, research shows

PUBLISHED: 23 February 2022

The Guardian

Rising global temperatures have shifted at least twice the amount of freshwater from warm regions towards the Earth’s poles than previously thought as the water cycle intensifies, according to new analysis. Climate change has intensified the global water cycle by up to 7.4% – compared to previous modeling estimates of 2% to 4%, research published in the journal Nature suggests. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: In Riverina rice fields, farmers and scientists join forces to save a mysterious waterbird

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2022

The Guardian

With fewer than 2,000 Australasian bitterns left in the wild, the endangered bird relies on the wet rice fields to fledge their young. Rice farmers and ecologists in southwest New South Wales are weaving new partnerships between agriculture and wildlife conservation in efforts to rescue a little-known waterbird with a mysterious story. But pressure from the water market, crop competition, and, ironically, increasing water efficiency, could pose a threat to their efforts. Click here to continue reading

Province says recovery may take longer for some B.C. farms as flood support funds start being issued

PUBLISHED: 22 February 2022

CTV News

The province says cheques have already been handed out to some agricultural operations in B.C. that were devastated by last fall’s floods, as part of a $228-million recovery program. The agriculture minister said not all farms will likely be able to get producing again this year. It’s been almost two weeks since a new federal and provincial funding program was announced, aimed at supporting farmers as they rebuild from the floodwaters that surged during November storms, turning fields in Abbotsford’s Sumas Prairie into lakes. Click here to continue reading

Agbusinesses join forces to tackle water management

PUBLISHED: 18 February 2022

The Western Producer

Four large agricultural companies are joining forces on a water management project in Manitoba. Nutrien, General Mills, Simplot, and BASF are part of a pilot project, announced in early February. The idea is to improve water quality and quantity on the eastern Prairies by altering land, water, and nutrient management on Manitoba farms. The initiative, called the Lake Winnipeg Water Stewardship Project, will be tested with producers who farm in two different watersheds. Click here to continue reading

Warming oceans are threatening the Inuit way of life

PUBLISHED: 18 February 2022

CBC News

In January, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released their annual report on the state of the world’s climate. While 2021 didn’t top the list of the planet’s hottest years on record (it was the fourth-hottest), it was in fact the warmest year for our oceans. As with most aspects of climate change, the people who are seeing that warming the most are in the Arctic. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Biden pledges $1B to speed clean up of toxins in Great Lakes

PUBLISHED: 17 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Long-delayed cleanup of Great Lakes harbors and tributary rivers fouled with industrial toxins will accelerate dramatically with a $1 billion boost from President Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan, senior administration officials say. The infusion from the bipartisan measure enacted in November, combined with annual funding through an ongoing recovery program, will enable agencies by 2030 to finish work on 22 sites designated a quarter-century ago as among the region’s most degraded, officials said Thursday. Click here to continue reading

Fish love songs and fighting talk: underwater sound library to reveal language of the deep

PUBLISHED: 17 February 2022

The Guardian

From the “boing” of a minke whale to the “drum” of a red piranha, scientists are documenting more sounds in our world’s oceans, rivers and lakes every year. Now, a team of experts wants to go a step further and create a reference library of aquatic noise to monitor the health of marine ecosystems. Of the roughly 250,000 known marine species, scientists think all 126 mammals emit noise. Click here to continue reading

Advocates say Canada can’t save struggling B.C. salmons stocks without Alaska’s help

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2022

Ponoka News

Significant numbers of salmon returning to spawn in British Columbia are being caught in southeast Alaskan fisheries, hindering Canada’s efforts to preserve and rebuild stocks that are declining to historic lows, B.C. salmon advocates say. Canada and the United States ratified the Pacific Salmon Treaty in 1985 to manage cross-border harvesting, but it wasn’t designed to deal with climate change and stocks that are in crisis. Click here to continue reading

‘We are in very bad shape’: Dry winter in southern Alberta has farmers worried

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2022

CTV News

Harold Hawkwood was doing chores when he found 60-centimetre deep cracks in the soil on his ranch northeast of Cochrane, Alta. — and he’s never seen anything like it. Hawkwood has run Ironwood Ranches since 1980. “Actually we are in very bad shape,” he said. “A lot of the dugouts are dry, the big sloughs have gone down and the water table has actually gone down.” Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: US sea level to rise as much in next 30 years as in past century – study

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2022

The Guardian

America’s vast coastline is being assailed by rapidly encroaching oceans, with up to 1ft of sea-level rise expected in the next 30 years – an increase that equals the total rise seen over the past century, a major US federal government report has found. The seas are rising significantly faster around the US than the global average, a situation that will cause a “dramatic increase” in the number of Americans, already numbering tens of millions, vulnerable to disastrous flooding, the analysis warns. Click here to continue reading

Environment Canada scientists link B.C. floods to human-caused climate change

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Human-induced climate change “contributed substantially” to the atmospheric river and ensuing floods that devastated B.C. last year, a new study by Environment Canada scientists confirms, warning Canadians to brace for more of the same. The two-day atmospheric river that swept across southern B.C. in mid-November led to the deaths of at least five people, caused multiple evacuations, and is the costliest natural disaster in B.C.’s history, with a hefty price tag of $7.5 billion for infrastructure damage alone. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The ‘solar canals’ making smart use of India’s space

PUBLISHED: 16 February 2022

BBC Future

India has relied traditionally on coal-fired power plants, which generated 72% of the country’s electricity in 2018-19. India’s combination of abundant sunshine – about 300 sunny days in a year – and a large energy-hungry population makes it an ideal location for solar. The country’s solar capacity reached 36.6GW at the end of the first quarter of 2020, with the aim of growing to 100GW by 2022. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The West’s megadrought is worst in 1,200 years. Los Angeles is taking wastewater recycling to the extreme

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2022

CNN

The West is in its worst drought in centuries, scientists reported Monday. A study published in Nature Climate Change found the period from 2000 to 2021 was the driest in 1,200 years. Last year’s drought severity was “exceptional,” researchers said, and all indications are the extreme conditions will continue through 2022. The human-caused climate crisis has made the megadrought 72% worse, the study noted. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Flint water crisis trial will test contractors’ liability

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Jury selection starts Tuesday in a trial to determine if engineering contractors bear responsibility for lead-contaminated water in Flint. Attorneys for four Flint children claim Veolia and LAN were negligent in not doing more to get the city to properly treat water that was being pulled from the Flint River in 2014-15. Corrosive water caused lead to leach from service lines serving homes, a disastrous result in the majority Black community. Click here to continue reading

Study recommends six steps to improve our water quality

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2022

University of Waterloo

Nitrogen fertilizers are critical for growing crops to feed the world, yet when applied in excess can pollute our water for decades. A new study provides six steps to address nitrogen pollution and improve water quality. The study from the University of Waterloo appearing in Nature Geoscience provides a roadmap for scientists, policymakers, and the public to overcome the challenges associated with this legacy nitrogen for faster improvements to our water quality. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Drugs have dangerously polluted the world’s rivers, scientists warn

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2022

The Guardian

Humanity’s drugs have polluted rivers across the entire world and pose “a global threat to environmental and human health”, according to the most comprehensive study to date. Pharmaceuticals and other biologically active compounds used by humans are known to harm wildlife and antibiotics in the environment drive up the risk of resistance to the drugs, one of the greatest threats to humanity. Click here to continue reading

Dryland fish farming aims at a hungry market

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2022

The Western Producer

Companies find that raising aquatic livestock far from natural water bodies makes business and environmental sense. As the world population grows in number and affluence, the demand for high-quality protein is putting unsustainable pressure on wild fish stocks but also creating opportunities for aquaculture alongside dryland farming. Fish farming checks a lot of boxes, both from a practical and marketing standpoint. It has the potential to reduce pressure on overfished wild stocks. Click here to continue reading

Farmers brace for more drought conditions as unusually warm weather continues

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2022

Global News

While Calgarians revel in the warm, dry weather we’re seeing this February, it’s a different story for farmers and producers outside the city. Last year, 2021, was Calgary’s fourth driest year on record, and so far 2022 hasn’t brought much relief. Warmer weather is causing soil moisture to evaporate, which Alberta Agriculture’s Ralph Wright predicts could create another drought for the growing season. Click here to continue reading

Upgrades to North Shuswap community’s water system complete

PUBLISHED: 15 February 2022

Salmon Arm Observer

The Columbia Shuswap Regional District announced the completion of a $1.4 million upgrade to the Saratoga water system in Scotch Creek. The regional district added upgrades to the water system including a larger reservoir at a higher elevation to increase water pressure; a dedicated supply line to the reservoir and a larger treated water main from the reservoir; a pressure reducing station; a new chlorination system with a second UV disinfection reactor; larger-capacity pumps; three-phase power to the treatment plant; and the installment of fencing. Click here to continue reading

Town of Stettler will see major water main replacement this summer

PUBLISHED: 10 February 2022

East Central Alberta Review

The Town of Stettler will include major water main replacement along with a large runway paving project at the municipal airport, plus many other items included in the 2022 capital budget which was unanimously approved by council at their Feb. 1 regular meeting. The capital budget, which includes the town’s expenditures for construction and infrastructure projects, was introduced by both Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) Greg Switenky and Assistant CAO Steven Gerlitz. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Hidden depths: why do we know so little about what happens to a lake in winter?

PUBLISHED: 10 February 2022

The Guardian

Less is known about what happens during winter in freshwater ecosystems, which are fragile and contain many imperilled species, and how they are being affected by the climate crisis. That is something that the UKCEH researchers want to rectify. Water samples will be sent off to test the acidity, concentrations of oxygen and nutrients, and the volume of phytoplankton and zooplankton. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Great Barrier Reef: cooler weather reduces threat of mass bleaching outbreak this summer

PUBLISHED: 10 February 2022

The Guardian

The risk of widespread coral bleaching across the Great Barrier Reef has subsided after cloud and rain over the past 10 days caused “substantial cooling” of heat-stressed corals, according to the government’s reef management authority. Scientists and conservationists have feared it could suffer its sixth major mass bleaching outbreak this summer with record high temperatures over the reef in December. Click here to continue reading

Town of Stettler will see major water main replacement this summer

PUBLISHED: 10 February 2022

East Central Alberta Review

The Town of Stettler will include major water main replacement along with a large runway paving project at the municipal airport, plus many other items included in the 2022 capital budget which was unanimously approved by council at their Feb. 1 regular meeting. The capital budget, which includes the town’s expenditures for construction and infrastructure projects, was introduced by both Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) Greg Switenky and Assistant CAO Steven Gerlitz. Click here to continue reading

$228M flood recovery program helping B.C. farms return to production

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2022

Government of British Columbia 

B.C. farmers who suffered extraordinary damages during November’s devastating floods will have access to up to $228 million in federal-provincial government support to help their farms return to production and support British Columbia’s food security and agricultural communities in the years ahead. Marie-Claude Bibeau, federal Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, and Lana Popham, B.C.’s Minister of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries, have announced the Canada-BC Flood Recovery for Food Security Program. Click here to continue reading

Ontario Takes Further Action to Protect the Great Lakes

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2022

Government of Ontario

The Ontario government is supporting projects that help communities protect and improve the health of the Great Lakes by investing an additional $1.9 million in the Great Lakes Local Action Fund. This new investment will help support innovative projects led by community-based organizations, small businesses, municipalities, conservation authorities, and Indigenous communities that focus on protecting and restoring coastal, shoreline, and nearshore areas of the Great Lakes and its connecting rivers and streams. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia facing devastating drought conditions: UN

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2022

CBC News

The UN World Food Programme said on Tuesday that 13 million people across the Horn of Africa face severe hunger and called for immediate assistance to avoid a repeat of a famine a decade ago that killed hundreds of thousands of people. Three sub-par rainy seasons have created the driest conditions since the 1980s, with forecasts of below-average rainfall set to increase suffering in the coming months. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: High levels of toxic chemicals found in Cambridgeshire water supply

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2022

The Guardian

Water from a supply containing high levels of toxic chemicals has been pumped into the homes of more than 1,000 people, the Guardian can reveal. Cambridge Water has admitted it removed a supply containing four times the regulatory limit of perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS), which was being blended with other supplies to provide water to the homes of customers in south Cambridgeshire, in June last year. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Illegal strawberry farms threaten future of Spanish wetlands

PUBLISHED: 09 February 2022

The Guardian

Water supplies to Doñana, whose marshes, forests and dunes extend across almost 130,000 hectares in the provinces of Huelva, Seville, and Cádiz, have declined drastically over the past 30 years because of climate change, farming, mining pollution, and marsh drainage. A fresh crisis now looms as regional authorities consider granting an amnesty to the farmers illegally tapping its aquifer to feed the booming strawberry sector. Click here to continue reading

Below normal runoff predicted for southern Sask.

PUBLISHED: 08 February 2022

The Western Producer 

A preliminary spring runoff report issued by Water Security Agency today shows spring runoff potential is below normal in most of southern Saskatchewan. Central areas have above-normal snowpack and should expect above normal snowmelt. The far north should see near-normal conditions. The WSA said there is an area east of Moose Jaw through Weyburn, Indian Head, and Regina, where wetter conditions last fall and near-normal snowfall project near-normal snowmelt. Click here to continue reading

B.C. shellfish growers will sink or swim with new marine debris rules

PUBLISHED: 08 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

West Coast growers have endured a tough couple of years as the COVID-19 pandemic dried up demand from restaurants and international markets, and extreme temperatures in June cooked countless beach-grown oysters and clams alive in their shells. And now growers have another sink or swim dilemma — the need to change farming practices and tackle marine debris created by the shellfish sector. Click here to continue reading

New approach to water management in Manitoba

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2022

Global News

There are many ways climate change will manifest itself in Canada: wildfires, extreme heat, hail and wind storms, permafrost loss. But the most frequent and costly natural disaster in Canada is flooding. A warming and increasingly volatile climate is causing a rise in sea levels and more intense rainfall. Combine that with decades of paving over wetlands and forests — nature’s sponges — and you have all the ingredients for catastrophic flooding. Click here to continue reading

Governments to announce recovery plan for B.C. agriculture industry after floods

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2022

Red Deer Advocate

A recovery package is expected to be announced today for British Columbia’s agriculture industry after devastating floods last November. The B.C. and federal agriculture ministers were scheduled to make an announcement, billing it as the largest recovery program for the sector in the province’s history. Record rains combined with overflowing rivers in mid-November swamped farmland in several areas of southern B.C. and Vancouver Island. In the Sumas Prairie, water flooded barns, fields, and homes. Click here to continue reading

Province’s new interactive flood-predicting map ‘basic’ but valuable, says advocate

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2022

CBC News

New Brunswickers can now zoom in to a visual image of their homes, neighbourhoods and communities to see how likely it is that climate change will create a risk of flooding over the next several decades. The provincial government has released a new interactive provincial flood map showing different river and coastal flooding scenarios for today and for 2100. The zoomable maps allow users to apply several scenarios. They can see what a one-in-20-year and a one-in-100-year flood would look like today. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: ‘Giant obstacle course’: call to reroute major shipping lanes to protect blue whales

PUBLISHED: 07 February 2022

The Guardian

Scientists and conservation groups are calling for one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes to be rerouted in an effort to protect the world’s largest animal. Since 2008, researchers have been painstakingly piecing together clues about a little-known, endangered population of blue whales that live off the southern tip of Sri Lanka. What they have discovered so far hints at one group of cetaceans or even a sub-species. Click here to continue reading

Canada and New Brunswick invest in water supply infrastructure to help remove and prevent boil water advisories in rural communities

PUBLISHED: 04 February 2022

Newswire

Investments in safer and more efficient water services helps keep our communities healthy, green and sustainable. That is why the Government of Canada is investing over $2.2 million to upgrade the water supply infrastructure in two rural New Brunswick communities through the Green Infrastructure Stream (GIS). These projects will help communities remain great places to live and ensure long-term infrastructure performance. Click here to continue reading

New smart meters in Sudbury will help track water consumption

PUBLISHED: 04 February 2022

CBC News

The new smart water meter system being installed in homes across Greater Sudbury will help customers track water consumption, in real-time. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the city embarked on a $17 million project to switch old water meters to smart technology. After several delays, the work continues with more than 80 percent of customers still to change over. Click here to continue reading

B.C.’s shellfish sector has a plastics problem

PUBLISHED: 03 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Coastal communities are tired of paying to clean up plastic and debris from the B.C. shellfish industry to protect the marine environment, stewardship groups say. Plastic shellfish trays, buoys, shoreline predator prevention netting, rope, and Styrofoam used for float platforms that disintegrate into tiny irretrievable pieces are some of the greatest problems. The trash harms salmon habitat in estuaries and poses entanglement risks to birds or other marine mammals, such as seals, sea lions, and whales. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Ocean eddies could explain Antarctic sea-ice paradox

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2022

Science Daily

Despite global warming and the sea-ice loss in the Arctic, the Antarctic sea-ice extent has remained largely unchanged since 1979. However, existing climate model-based simulations indicate significant sea-ice loss, contrary to actual observations. Given that many models are not capable of accurately reflecting this factor and the role of ocean eddies, the study, which was just published in the journal Nature Communications, provides the basis for improved simulations and forecasts of the future development of the Antarctic. Click here to continue reading

A controversial salmon farm expansion has been approved in Nova Scotia

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A controversial salmon farm expansion has been approved in Nova Scotia retroactively after years of operating with a larger salmon and cage count than its lease allowed. Kelly Cove Salmon Ltd. has been running over capacity for the past 18 years with the province’s knowledge. The company sought to legitimize its operations through the Nova Scotia Aquaculture Review Board (NSARB) with a boundary amendment, which was granted Jan. 28. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Good and bad news when it comes to porpoises and tidal power

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

Tidal power is billed as a green, renewable energy source that avoids burning fossil fuels and releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. But new research is raising a red flag about this promising power source. An experiment conducted at a tidal power site in northern Scotland has shown that tidal turbines generate enough noise to displace harbour porpoises, a legally protected species. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Scotland hopes to save wild salmon by planting millions of trees next to rivers

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2022

The Guardian

Millions of trees are being planted beside Scotland’s remotest rivers and streams to protect wild salmon from the worst effects of climate heating. Fisheries scientists have found rivers and burns in the Highlands and uplands are already too warm in summer for wild Atlantic salmon as they head upstream to spawn, increasing the threat to the species’ survival. Fisheries on the River Dee in Aberdeenshire, one of the country’s most famous salmon fishing rivers, have planted 250,000 saplings along key tributaries. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: All coral will suffer severe bleaching when global heating hits 1.5C, study finds

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2022

The Guardian

Almost no corals on the planet will escape severe bleaching once global heating reaches 1.5C, according to a new study of the world’s reefs. Reefs in areas currently regarded as cooler refuges will be overwhelmed at 1.5C of heating, and just 0.2% of reefs will escape at least one bleaching outbreak every decade, according to the research. The team of scientists from the University of Leeds, Texas Tech University and James Cook University used the latest climate model projections to confirm that 1.5C of global heating “will be catastrophic for coral reefs”. Click here to continue reading

Extreme heat in oceans ‘passed point of no return’ in 2014

PUBLISHED: 02 February 2022

The Guardian

Extreme heat in the world’s oceans passed the “point of no return” in 2014 and has become the new normal, according to research. Scientists analysed sea surface temperatures over the last 150 years, which have risen because of global heating. They found that extreme temperatures occurring just 2% of the time a century ago have occurred at least 50% of the time across the global ocean since 2014. Click here to continue reading

uOttawa Study Shows Widespread Retreat and Loss of Marine-Terminating Glaciers in the Northern Hemisphere

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2022

University of Ottawa

Two researchers from the University of Ottawa are the first to map out all the glaciers that end in the ocean in the Northern Hemisphere and provide a measure of their rate of change over the last 20 years. Their findings will help better understand – and perhaps predict – the impact of climate change north of the equator. They analyzed all 1704 glaciers that touched the ocean in the year 2000 and documented their frontal position in 2000, 2010, and 2020. Click here to continue reading

One sea to many oceans: First of its kind study on oxygen flow and its role in sustaining life globally

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2022

Science Daily 

The Labrador Sea between Canada and Greenland is often referred to as a ‘lung of the deep ocean’ because it is one of only a handful of locations worldwide where oxygen from the atmosphere can enter the deepest layers of the ocean. The ability to sustain animal life in the deep ocean depends directly on this localized ‘deep breathing’. This process is driven by wintertime cooling at the sea surface, which makes oxygen-rich, near-surface waters denser and heavy enough to sink to depths of around 2 km in winter. Click here to continue reading

When measuring climate change, don’t forget about the humidity

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2022

Canada’s National Observer

When it comes to measuring global warming, humidity, not just heat, matters in generating dangerous climate extremes, a new study finds. Researchers say temperature by itself isn’t the best way to measure climate change’s weird weather and downplays impacts in the tropics. But factoring in air moisture along with heat shows that climate change since 1980 is near twice as bad as previously calculated, according to their study in Monday’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Click here to continue reading

Bio-engineering video now available to watch online

PUBLISHED: 01 February 2022

Ghost Watershed Alliance Society

Over the last couple of months, GWAS has been working on a video on bio-engineering. The video entitled, “Working Together to Restore our Watersheds,” is now complete. Following the very well-attended online screening premiere on January 25, the video is now available for viewing on the GWAS YouTube channel. Thanks to the generous funding from the City of Calgary, GWAS was able to document this important restoration work. Click here to continue reading

International high seas expedition out to learn Pacific salmon secrets

PUBLISHED: 31 January 2022

Canada’s National Observer

A multinational scientific expedition is set to launch to solve the mystery of what happens when salmon head into the Pacific Ocean and how climate change is impacting both the iconic fish and their marine environment. The goal is to explore the marine ecology looking for what salmon eat or what eats them — including plankton or large predators such as salmon sharks — while tracking the main objective, various salmon stocks both abundant or threatened. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: The US is losing some of its biggest freshwater reserves

PUBLISHED: 31 January 2022

Popular Science 

Less than 3 percent of Earth is covered in freshwater. And while that percentage has remained pretty constant, population growth has not. Only 1 percent of freshwater is accessible to the 7.7 billion people and counting. As concerns over water scarcity grow, research published in Nature recently documents how freshwater availability has changed over the years, helping water specialists and managers pinpoint how this essential resource’s flows have been changing. Click here to continue reading

Ontario Helping Municipalities Build Storm and Wastewater Infrastructure

PUBLISHED: 28 January 2022

Government of Ontario

The Ontario government is investing $25 million to build, upgrade and rehabilitate storm and wastewater infrastructure. This investment includes dedicating $15 million to improve the aging and outdated storm and wastewater infrastructure in 18 municipalities. This will help modernize water management in these areas to make them more efficient and reliable, to ensure Ontarians can continue to access safe and clean water today and for generations to come. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Aid agencies scale up Storm Ana response amid floods and rising death toll

PUBLISHED: 27 January 2022

The Guardian

Humanitarian agencies have mounted an emergency response across southern Africa this week as the death toll from tropical Storm Ana reached 70. Officials reported that at least 41 people had been killed in Madagascar, 18 in Mozambique and 11 in Malawi. The EU’s aid agency Echo said on Thursday that at least 350,000 people have been affected across the three countries, including more than 80,000 displaced from their homes. Flooding has cut off roads and damaged power and water supplies. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Coral crusaders: Costa Rica’s young divers learn to protect their seas

PUBLISHED: 27 January 2022

The Guardian

Adir Garrido, Maitén Moore, Anumí Sassaroli, Esteban Gallo and Salim, as well as almost two dozen local divers, are part of the Ambassadors of the Sea Community Diving Centre, a non-profit organisation created in 2014 to provide opportunities for young people to do conservation work, such as seabed cleaning, reef monitoring, water pollution analysis, and underwater archaeology. Click here to continue reading

Interior Fraser steelhead face extinction, warn B.C. fishing, conservation groups

PUBLISHED: 27 January 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Fishery and conservation groups in British Columbia warn a unique species of ocean-going trout faces a “severe conservation crisis” and must be added to Canada’s Species at Risk Act. Fifteen groups, including the BC Wildlife Federation and the Steelhead Society of BC, have written to the federal environment and fisheries ministers urging immediate action on behalf of dwindling stocks of Interior Fraser steelhead, a variety of rainbow trout. Click here to continue reading

Compare and Contrast: Ski resorts aim for more efficient snowmaking amid drought

PUBLISHED: 27 January 2022

Red Deer Advocate

Snowpack in the U.S. West has decreased by about 20% in the last century, making man-made snow more vital each year to opening ski resorts and fueling ski town economies as they head into an uncertain future. As the effects of drought and climate change increasingly hit home, the ski industry has invested millions of dollars in more efficient snowmaking systems amid questions about whether the practice is a wise use of energy and wa