The Bog

The Bog is where thoughts, opinions, discussion pieces, and action converge. Influential thinkers from the water community are invited to share their insights on current or controversial water topics. Please note that the views expressed herein are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Alberta WaterPortal.

By Rain Saulnier of WaterSMART Solutions

Hydrogen is generating considerable attention as a potential key energy source and part of the transition to a low carbon economy. Hydrogen is the most abundant element on earth; however, it rarely exists on its own. Water resources are an essential consideration for a hydrogen economy because hydrogen is a component of water and is also a key part of many of the processes required to split hydrogen off of the other elements it is bonded with. 

How much water is required to produce hydrogen? How much water and hydrogen would be required to replace 20% of the natural gas produced in Alberta? What is the cost of producing hydrogen? A report was recently published by WaterSMART Solutions Ltd. that responds to these questions. The report highlights the importance of water in the development of the hydrogen economy, and particularly begins to consider the tradeoffs that will likely be required with existing water consuming sectors in the province. The report reviews the water demands for three of the most likely methods for producing hydrogen on a large scale, and explores the case study of future hydrogen production in Alberta. A link to the report is at the bottom of this article.  

By Alixx Hettinga, Communications Coordinator for the WaterPortal Society

The Alberta WaterPortal Society is releasing fun, new, online materials to make learning about water an adventure you can have from home.New Nexus Visual

These new resources include interactive games and short animations that make learning fun for everyone. They explore how human actions impact the Nexus between communities, agriculture, and energy, and the resource that ties them all together: water. As the population in Alberta increases, users must contemplate how to balance the demand for water for food, energy, people and the environment. 

Every July, Friends of Fish Creek hosts its annual Creekfest event, an entertaining and interactive learning experience that is both family friendly and free of charge. This year, COVID-19 has unfortunately restricted our ability to meet in person, but that will not impede the continuance of this amazing educational opportunity. To keep its yearly public outreach going strong, Friends of Fish Creek is putting on Creekfest - Reimagined!, a collection of integrated virtual offerings from multiple organizations over the course of July 18-24, 2020. 

 

By Kathryn Wagner of Inside Education and Brie Nelson of the Alberta WaterPortal Society

The Alberta WaterPortal Society and Inside Education have a shared goal of helping Alberta teachers and students understand the interconnectedness of our water, food and energy systems: The nexus! Connections arise because these systems are reliant not only on each other, but also on the same limited resources. Our systems of producing energy require water; water pumping and treatment requires energy; agricultural production and the whole supply chain requires both water and energy; and our human communities need all of these systems, and the ecosystems that support them, in order to thrive. Recognizing the interconnections of these systems leads to opportunities and innovative problem-solving! (learn more here). 

Partnership image2

This spring, the Alberta WaterPortal Society partnered with Canadian non-profit, Waterlution to support the development and facilitation of the Water Innovation Lab (WIL) happening in Alberta this fall (October 5-11). 

The WaterPortal is very excited about becoming Waterlution’s strategic partner on this project because WIL is an incredible program that puts the Portal’s mission, of improved water management through increased education and awareness, into action. WIL advances this goal by bringing together the brightest and most passionate water leaders to create innovative ideas and projects that address regional water challenges.

Kim Sturgess, founder and Executive Director of the WaterPortal, said of the partnership “WIL provides the perfect framework for knowledge incubation, transfer, and innovation. The WaterPortal will ensure that ground-breaking ideas and projects generated at WIL will have home post-WIL, so that they translate into long-term, meaningful change in Alberta’s waterscape”. 

Karen Kun, president and co-founder of Waterlution, echoed these sentiments saying that “the Alberta WaterPortal Society is an incredible tool to seamlessly continue and advance the work done at WIL”.