The Guardian

 A plan to extract millions of litres of water out of a Unesco world heritage site, send it by pipe to the coast and ship it to foreign markets for bottling has ignited a campaign over water resources in New Zealand. Click here to continue reading

The Globe and Mail

Christy Clark continues to move ahead with this $9-billion project despite mounting evidence against it, as well as opposition from such diverse groups as First Nations, farmers, Amnesty International, academic scientists and now even the Association of Major Power Customers of B.C. Click here to continue reading

Nanton News

The Town of Nanton is pleased to announce that the construction for the new waste water treatment plant is almost complete. To mark this occasion, an official ribbon cutting ceremony will take place in Nanton on Tuesday, March 28 at 2 p.m. Click here to continue reading

Statistics Canada

Human Activity and the Environment 2016: Freshwater in Canada provides up-to-date statistics on freshwater supply and demand and includes maps, charts and tables for each of Canada’s 25 drainage regions. Click here to continue reading

The Globe and Mail

Most Canadians have access to free-flowing tap water that’s clean, fresh and safe. So why, wonders Corey Mintz, does the bottled water industry make $2.5-billion in annual sales? Click here to continue reading

CBC News

An investigation into a major oil spill in Saskatchewan last year has been handed over to Crown prosecutors. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

In Beijing’s Tongzhou Number Six school, around 100 impeccably-behaved middle school students are being lectured about water. The visiting teacher tells them that, among other things, they should take shorter showers, buy less clothes, eat less meat and drink tea rather than coffee, to help alleviate China’s water scarcity problems. Click here to continue reading

infrastructurene.ws

Backed by the Global Water Leader Group and the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Water, New Models for Water Access outlines how the problems of bad water and sanitation can be solved at a lower overall cost than our current inadequate arrangements. Click here to continue reading

Calgary Herald

Spokesman Mel Duvall said in an email to The Canadian Press that cleanup at the site at Cox Hill Creek west of Bragg Creek is progressing well. But he added the terrain where the leak happened is “very rocky and difficult.” Click here to continue reading

Global News

Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology CEO Shauna Curry joins Global Calgary with details on why Calgary landmarks were lit blue on Wednesday. Click here to watch the video

Calgary Herald

While the June 2013 floods may be a distant memory for many, the disaster is still fresh in the minds of residents living near Calgary’s rivers who worry about a repeat, as the city works through a list of 27 flood mitigation recommendations. Click here to continue reading

CBC News

Over the next three years, 11 watershed councils will share $3.2 million, while the Alberta Water Council will get $750,000 per year over three years for its work preserving water resources, the province said in a release. Click here to continue reading

Calgary Herald

The community association has long been adamant they’re not opposed to development, but want a quality development on the green space. The group has also expressed significant concerns about water drainage issues on the site. Click here to continue reading

Drayton Valley Western Review

A slideshow presentation indicated that existing water rates are not sufficient to recover funds needed to meet utility requirements. Should the town continue with the current rates, a deficit of $10.30 million would result. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

“We focus on their susceptibility to disease but if we don’t also address the broad environmental risks we are going to fall short. Climate change is often felt through a change in the water – whether it’s a flood, rising sea levels or something else – and the effect of a changing climate is often felt by children through water first.” Click here to continue reading

National Observer

Three Yukon First Nations and two conservation groups are taking the Yukon government to the Supreme Court of Canada on Wednesday. This is the final chapter in a legal case that has stretched over three years and another step on the decades-long road to protect an unspoiled northern watershed from industrial development. Click here to continue reading

Global News

The City of Lethbridge is still urging residents to limit their water usage as much as possible to avoid having to issue a boil water advisory. But with the spring-like temperatures over the weekend, many people took the opportunity to wash their vehicles. As a result, many people also took to social media to voice their concerns. Click here to continue reading

The Guardian

Indian court cites the Whanganui in New Zealand as example for according status to two rivers considered sacred. Click here to continue reading

CBC News

An abandoned chairlift marks what once was a developed ski run that is now a destination for scientists who hope this site will lead to better forecasting of floods, drought and other weather patterns. Click here to continue reading

CBC News

Bruce Mcleod was born and raised in Highland Park. He said he's not entirely against development, but the plan needs to respect the wetland that underlies the area. "It's taking what little green space is in this area and completely devastating it," he said. Click here to continue reading

CBC News

AER spokeswoman Monica Hermary says Husky Energy of Calgary reported the spill at Cox Hill Creek on Thursday around 3 p.m. Click here to continue reading

Reuters

French waste and water group Suez has boosted its industrial water treatment business with the 3.2 billion euros ($3.4 billion) acquisition of GE Water from General Electric (GE.N). Click here to continue reading

Global News

The City of Lethbridge is still urging residents to conserve water due to conditions on the Oldman River. The city’s website states that a quick melt and ice jams are causing high turbidity in the river, making the water difficut to treat. Click here to continue reading

Metro Edmonton

Almost everyone on Frog Lake First Nation buys water — drinking from the tap is a no-go. “I believe the tap water is tied to sickness in some of our members,” said Greg Desjarlais, a councillor at Frog Lake First Nation, a community east of Edmonton. Click here to continue reading

The Globe and Mail

Canadians see fresh water as the country’s most important resource, but worry the country faces a growing risk to the quality and adequate supply of clean water, a new poll from the Royal Bank of Canada says. Click here to continue reading